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Hungarian Democratic Forum

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NEWS
March 12, 1989
The Hungarian Democratic Forum, the country's largest independent political group, opened its founding congress with a call for new policies and opportunities. The two-day congress of 750 delegates, representing 13,000 members, will elect leaders and debate a draft charter declaring such aims as freeing Hungary of the remnants of Stalinist rule.
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NEWS
May 4, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly elected President Arpad Goncz on Thursday asked historian Joszef Antall to form Hungary's first government of the post-Communist era. "We are taking the first steps toward creation of a new nation, and Antall is perfectly able to do this," Goncz said in praise of the man who will be Hungary's next prime minister. The selection of Antall was a formality closing the inaugural session of Parliament, which has launched a new age of democracy for this East European nation of 10.5 million.
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NEWS
October 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The major opposition group nominated historian Lajos Fuer to run for president of Hungary in multi-party elections. The Hungarian Democratic Forum made the nomination at the end of a three-day congress in Budapest. The action followed a landmark session of Parliament, which adopted laws to open the way for the first multi-party elections in more than 40 years. The presidential election is to be held by the end of the year, but no date has been set.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Parliament of Hungary launched a new era of democracy Wednesday by electing as head of state a veteran of the 1956 Hungarian Uprising, now hailed as a noble fight for freedom. The choice of 68-year-old Arpad Goncz (pronounced AH-pahd Gernts) to be president was engineered by the two biggest parties in Parliament in an attempt to render unnecessary a direct presidential election loosely scheduled for late summer and to avoid another divisive fight for power.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A center-right reform party surged ahead of rival liberals Monday in the protracted counting of Hungary's first competitive vote since 1945, although both parties claimed to be headed for victory in their quests to lead the next government. Runoff elections are expected April 8 to determine the majority of seats in the 386-member Parliament, and the political horse-trading needed to build a coalition Cabinet could drag on for more than a month.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The leaders of Hungary's new democratic opposition sat happily in front of a sidewalk cafe on an elegant little square Wednesday evening--and struggled for a moment to catch their breath. "If we had tried to do this six months ago," said Tibor Vidos, a spokesman for the new alliance of non-Communist trade unions, "we'd all be in the jailhouse." Only nine months ago, Hungary's political opposition led the furtive, harried life of dissidents under communism.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The Communist Party of Hungary and leading opposition groups have reached agreement on a plan for the coming elections that is likely to ensure that the office of president will go to Imre Pozsgay, the Communists' leading reform politician. The plan was adopted in the final round-table meeting between the opposition groups and the Communist Party--officially the Socialist Workers Party--and calls for a presidential election Nov. 26, with parliamentary elections to follow within three months.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The right-of-center Hungarian Democratic Forum won unexpectedly strong endorsement in Sunday's election finale and claimed the role of pathfinder in Hungary's march toward democracy and capitalism. The party's clear victory over rival liberals from the Alliance of Free Democrats reflected a burgeoning wave of conservatism that is washing over Eastern Europe in the wake of socialism's retreat. With virtually all of the ballots counted early today, the Forum had 42.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly elected President Arpad Goncz on Thursday asked historian Joszef Antall to form Hungary's first government of the post-Communist era. "We are taking the first steps toward creation of a new nation, and Antall is perfectly able to do this," Goncz said in praise of the man who will be Hungary's next prime minister. The selection of Antall was a formality closing the inaugural session of Parliament, which has launched a new age of democracy for this East European nation of 10.5 million.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of national pride that carried Joszef Antall and his Hungarian Democratic Forum to victory reflect a conservative sweep across Eastern Europe as Moscow's former satellites realign themselves toward the West. But the center-right Forum's success in striking an anti-leftist chord in an electorate long suppressed by socialism may prove difficult to duplicate among the strong liberal and leftist opposition it will face in Parliament.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joszef Antall, the man who will guide Hungary through the troubled waters of a new democracy, appeals to worried Hungarians with an aura of paternal authority and a commitment to restoring national pride. Like his countrymen, Antall was obliged to retreat after the failed 1956 effort to expel communism and forced to wait for the next chance, like a prisoner intent on escape.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Hungary's newly elected Parliament convenes for the first time today, it will attempt to set the record straight on 40 years of thwarted history and point the nation on a course that heads directly West. By unanimous agreement among the six main parties represented in Parliament, its first action will be to rewrite history so that the failed 1956 Hungarian uprising against Soviet domination will henceforth be portrayed as a "war of independence."
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of national pride that carried Joszef Antall and his Hungarian Democratic Forum to victory reflect a conservative sweep across Eastern Europe as Moscow's former satellites realign themselves toward the West. But the center-right Forum's success in striking an anti-leftist chord in an electorate long suppressed by socialism may prove difficult to duplicate among the strong liberal and leftist opposition it will face in Parliament.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The right-of-center Hungarian Democratic Forum won unexpectedly strong endorsement in Sunday's election finale and claimed the role of pathfinder in Hungary's march toward democracy and capitalism. The party's clear victory over rival liberals from the Alliance of Free Democrats reflected a burgeoning wave of conservatism that is washing over Eastern Europe in the wake of socialism's retreat. With virtually all of the ballots counted early today, the Forum had 42.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Tolgyessy, the 32-year-old wizard of the Alliance of Free Democrats, called it "the most complicated election system in the world." This was almost the only assessment of the Hungarian parliamentary elections that stood unchallenged Monday. The two parties with the highest number of votes, Tolgyessy's liberal Free Democrats and the center-right Hungarian Democratic Forum, both claimed to have taken the commanding ground in position for a second round of runoff elections on April 8.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A center-right reform party surged ahead of rival liberals Monday in the protracted counting of Hungary's first competitive vote since 1945, although both parties claimed to be headed for victory in their quests to lead the next government. Runoff elections are expected April 8 to determine the majority of seats in the 386-member Parliament, and the political horse-trading needed to build a coalition Cabinet could drag on for more than a month.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joszef Antall, the man who will guide Hungary through the troubled waters of a new democracy, appeals to worried Hungarians with an aura of paternal authority and a commitment to restoring national pride. Like his countrymen, Antall was obliged to retreat after the failed 1956 effort to expel communism and forced to wait for the next chance, like a prisoner intent on escape.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Parliament of Hungary launched a new era of democracy Wednesday by electing as head of state a veteran of the 1956 Hungarian Uprising, now hailed as a noble fight for freedom. The choice of 68-year-old Arpad Goncz (pronounced AH-pahd Gernts) to be president was engineered by the two biggest parties in Parliament in an attempt to render unnecessary a direct presidential election loosely scheduled for late summer and to avoid another divisive fight for power.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The major opposition group nominated historian Lajos Fuer to run for president of Hungary in multi-party elections. The Hungarian Democratic Forum made the nomination at the end of a three-day congress in Budapest. The action followed a landmark session of Parliament, which adopted laws to open the way for the first multi-party elections in more than 40 years. The presidential election is to be held by the end of the year, but no date has been set.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The Communist Party of Hungary and leading opposition groups have reached agreement on a plan for the coming elections that is likely to ensure that the office of president will go to Imre Pozsgay, the Communists' leading reform politician. The plan was adopted in the final round-table meeting between the opposition groups and the Communist Party--officially the Socialist Workers Party--and calls for a presidential election Nov. 26, with parliamentary elections to follow within three months.
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