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NEWS
March 25, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Marta Osztroluczki and the Independent Smallholders Party she hopes to represent in Parliament, the surest road to recovery from the ravages of socialism is to turn back the clock on more than 40 years. "Not much of the past 40 years is worth saving," insists Osztroluczki, a 26-year-old geography teacher, wife and mother of two from this northern farming town on the border with Czechoslovakia. "Everything we learned was designed to keep the Communist Party in power.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 32, Jindra Novak is too young to know the lot of private farmers like his grandparents, who husbanded a family spread in the fertile Elbe River valley until Communists seized it in 1948. But what he knows of the old life holds no romance. Then, farmers got up before the sun to milk the cows and feed the fowl. Nights were spent tending to travelers taken in to earn a few extra crowns toward a truck or a tractor. A day off was an unfathomable extravagance.
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NEWS
April 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Hungarian government to be named this month should immediately slash food and rent subsidies and impose other harsh but effective measures if it wants to attract the foreign money needed to rescue the economy, an international panel advised Friday. In a report timed to coincide with Sunday's final election round that will determine the next government, Western and Hungarian economists have outlined what they see as the most urgent measures needed to speed the transition to capitalism.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Hungarian government to be named this month should immediately slash food and rent subsidies and impose other harsh but effective measures if it wants to attract the foreign money needed to rescue the economy, an international panel advised Friday. In a report timed to coincide with Sunday's final election round that will determine the next government, Western and Hungarian economists have outlined what they see as the most urgent measures needed to speed the transition to capitalism.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
The world's richest nations Tuesday appeared ready to commit themselves to at least an additional $650 million in emergency aid to ease economic turmoil in Poland and Hungary. While the figure represents a major increase in assistance so far pledged by mainly Western democracies to help the two beleaguered East Bloc nations, it falls far short of the two countries' own request for aid.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 32, Jindra Novak is too young to know the lot of private farmers like his grandparents, who husbanded a family spread in the fertile Elbe River valley until Communists seized it in 1948. But what he knows of the old life holds no romance. Then, farmers got up before the sun to milk the cows and feed the fowl. Nights were spent tending to travelers taken in to earn a few extra crowns toward a truck or a tractor. A day off was an unfathomable extravagance.
NEWS
August 1, 2004 | Karl Peter Kirk, Associated Press Writer
"Cooperative" used to be a dirty word in this farming village just south of Budapest. Under communism, which ended in Hungary in 1990, farmers were forced to combine in state-run operations that provided them with little incentive to work efficiently or produce quality goods. But now with their nation a new member of the European Union, some Hungarian farmers are taking another look at pooling their resources as a way to compete with heavily subsidized competitors in Western Europe.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Marta Osztroluczki and the Independent Smallholders Party she hopes to represent in Parliament, the surest road to recovery from the ravages of socialism is to turn back the clock on more than 40 years. "Not much of the past 40 years is worth saving," insists Osztroluczki, a 26-year-old geography teacher, wife and mother of two from this northern farming town on the border with Czechoslovakia. "Everything we learned was designed to keep the Communist Party in power.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
The world's richest nations Tuesday appeared ready to commit themselves to at least an additional $650 million in emergency aid to ease economic turmoil in Poland and Hungary. While the figure represents a major increase in assistance so far pledged by mainly Western democracies to help the two beleaguered East Bloc nations, it falls far short of the two countries' own request for aid.
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