Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHungary Culture
IN THE NEWS

Hungary Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON
The kids were 16 and from the countryside. They came up shyly to Peter Muller after the concert, thrilled to meet the lead singer of Sziami in the flesh. Although they had been in grade school when Muller put together his first band, they knew his songs by heart now, turned on by older siblings and the word of mouth that kept alternative rock flourishing in Hungary before glasnost . "We're big fans of yours," the teen-agers told him solemnly backstage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the Baroque promenades, the Danube River vistas and the Old World charm that make this regal capital one of the top business and tourist destinations in Eastern Europe: Istvan Bosze and his friends would rather be at the mall. Not that Bosze knows a whole lot about shopping malls. He's only seen three, and the first of those just opened here last fall. But make no mistake about it. Malls are the coolest thing. Ever.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
With about 2,000 slightly sunburned vacationers from Budapest looking on, Janos Kobor, lead singer of Omega, pranced onto the stage through a cloud of artificial smoke that swirled and billowed in the red and purple lights. He snapped the microphone cord, shook his mane of blond hair and growled the signature lines from the latest Omega album. "The gates of darkness seldom open," he hissed, "on the dark side of the earth."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1997 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the Budapest Festival Orchestra opens its latest U.S. tour this week, it brings with it the support of its native city. The 14-year-old group, which plays tonight in Costa Mesa, hasn't always had the official approval or municipal financial backing it has enjoyed since 1992.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | BLAINE HARDEN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Sammy needs a haircut. The last time he needed a haircut--that was in January--he bit his hairdresser. Sammy has an appointment here at Kosmetika, a downtown salon where most clients do not even bark under the blow-dryer, let alone bite. Naturally, not everyone is looking forward to Sammy's arrival. Yet he is a longtime customer, and he does live with a Budapest actress. The schnauzer is due at 1 p.m.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a subject no one wants to speak about, not even doctors who have patients with the disease. But the sad truth is irrefutable: A startling number of people in this small Central European country are dying from cancer. Hungarian men top international charts for males and Hungarian women place third in their category in per-capita rankings of cancer mortality, according to statistics from the World Health Organization. Last year, more than 30,000 people in this country of 10.
NEWS
November 20, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young farmer's wife never thought about murdering her newborn baby, she told police. Rather, an unspoken, centuries-old code of conduct in Hungary may have condemned the infant to death. After putting down her toddler for a nap, the woman stumbled into the kitchen of her two-room farmhouse. Her bloated belly burned. She collapsed on a sofa. The baby came in minutes. "I had to tear the umbilical cord myself," the 25-year-old woman, identified under Hungarian law only as Mrs. K.L.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget the Baroque promenades, the Danube River vistas and the Old World charm that make this regal capital one of the top business and tourist destinations in Eastern Europe: Istvan Bosze and his friends would rather be at the mall. Not that Bosze knows a whole lot about shopping malls. He's only seen three, and the first of those just opened here last fall. But make no mistake about it. Malls are the coolest thing. Ever.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The face of Prime Minister Miklos Nemeth, as he stands before the lame-duck Hungarian National Assembly daring it to press a vote of no-confidence, is a study in gloom. He wins his argument and averts the vote, but weariness and the pessimism registered on his features remains. The taxi driver, his offers to change money at black-market rates declined, sinks back into sullen combat with the traffic, turning up the disco music on the radio one more notch. "What the hell," he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1993 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Southern California's small community of Hungarian-born Holocaust survivors, the little newspaper from Gardena triggers memories of another, faraway time, an age of intolerance when fascist thugs roamed the streets of Budapest. Uj Vilag (New World), a Hungarian-language weekly, harangues against Hungary's 80,000-strong Jewish population, blaming them for a host of ills in the Eastern European country.
NEWS
November 20, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young farmer's wife never thought about murdering her newborn baby, she told police. Rather, an unspoken, centuries-old code of conduct in Hungary may have condemned the infant to death. After putting down her toddler for a nap, the woman stumbled into the kitchen of her two-room farmhouse. Her bloated belly burned. She collapsed on a sofa. The baby came in minutes. "I had to tear the umbilical cord myself," the 25-year-old woman, identified under Hungarian law only as Mrs. K.L.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a subject no one wants to speak about, not even doctors who have patients with the disease. But the sad truth is irrefutable: A startling number of people in this small Central European country are dying from cancer. Hungarian men top international charts for males and Hungarian women place third in their category in per-capita rankings of cancer mortality, according to statistics from the World Health Organization. Last year, more than 30,000 people in this country of 10.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1993 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Southern California's small community of Hungarian-born Holocaust survivors, the little newspaper from Gardena triggers memories of another, faraway time, an age of intolerance when fascist thugs roamed the streets of Budapest. Uj Vilag (New World), a Hungarian-language weekly, harangues against Hungary's 80,000-strong Jewish population, blaming them for a host of ills in the Eastern European country.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON
The kids were 16 and from the countryside. They came up shyly to Peter Muller after the concert, thrilled to meet the lead singer of Sziami in the flesh. Although they had been in grade school when Muller put together his first band, they knew his songs by heart now, turned on by older siblings and the word of mouth that kept alternative rock flourishing in Hungary before glasnost . "We're big fans of yours," the teen-agers told him solemnly backstage.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | BLAINE HARDEN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Sammy needs a haircut. The last time he needed a haircut--that was in January--he bit his hairdresser. Sammy has an appointment here at Kosmetika, a downtown salon where most clients do not even bark under the blow-dryer, let alone bite. Naturally, not everyone is looking forward to Sammy's arrival. Yet he is a longtime customer, and he does live with a Budapest actress. The schnauzer is due at 1 p.m.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The face of Prime Minister Miklos Nemeth, as he stands before the lame-duck Hungarian National Assembly daring it to press a vote of no-confidence, is a study in gloom. He wins his argument and averts the vote, but weariness and the pessimism registered on his features remains. The taxi driver, his offers to change money at black-market rates declined, sinks back into sullen combat with the traffic, turning up the disco music on the radio one more notch. "What the hell," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1997 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the Budapest Festival Orchestra opens its latest U.S. tour this week, it brings with it the support of its native city. The 14-year-old group, which plays tonight in Costa Mesa, hasn't always had the official approval or municipal financial backing it has enjoyed since 1992.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
With about 2,000 slightly sunburned vacationers from Budapest looking on, Janos Kobor, lead singer of Omega, pranced onto the stage through a cloud of artificial smoke that swirled and billowed in the red and purple lights. He snapped the microphone cord, shook his mane of blond hair and growled the signature lines from the latest Omega album. "The gates of darkness seldom open," he hissed, "on the dark side of the earth."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|