Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHungary Defense
IN THE NEWS

Hungary Defense

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Miklos Nemeth said Friday that Hungary will slash its armed forces by up to 25% in the next two years, scrapping many offensive weapons and regrouping them away from its western frontier. He also announced a shake-up in the defense command, replacing the army chief of staff and dismissing three deputy ministers. The cuts in hardware and personnel are on top of a 9% reduction announced last January.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic set to join NATO next month, a celebratory mood in these countries is tempered by their determination that the alliance not weaken its ability to defend members as it takes on new missions. The three nations will join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on March 12 during a ceremony at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Mo.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parliament announced Wednesday that a 40-man Hungarian army medical team is being readied for service in the Persian Gulf, and a five-hour secret session on "matters of national defense" fueled speculation that Hungarian airspace or bases might be used in the event of an attack on Iraq.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hungary, attempting to meet its defense needs independently of Moscow for the first time in decades, wants to buy much of the arsenal of the former East Germany. Defense Ministry spokesman Gyoergy Keleti said the items his country wants include 360 T-72 tanks, 350 BPM infantry fighting vehicles, 50 million rounds of ammunition and 100,000 anti-tank guided missiles.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hungary, attempting to meet its defense needs independently of Moscow for the first time in decades, wants to buy much of the arsenal of the former East Germany. Defense Ministry spokesman Gyoergy Keleti said the items his country wants include 360 T-72 tanks, 350 BPM infantry fighting vehicles, 50 million rounds of ammunition and 100,000 anti-tank guided missiles.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of Hungary's drift from the Kremlin's orbit, the newly elected Parliament on Wednesday applauded an opposition proposal that Hungary withdraw from the Warsaw Pact and suspend all military exercises with the alliance until the break can be formally negotiated. In another development, Defense Minister Gyorgy Karpathy confirmed reports that Hungary has sold Soviet-built MIG jets to the United States but denied that the sales disclosed any Soviet military secrets.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gearing up to go out of business, the six Warsaw Pact nations Saturday signed an agreement on how to share a pared-down inventory of tanks and artillery, the last major obstacle to a European conventional arms treaty that will be signed in Paris later this month. The agreement fixes distribution of 20,000 tanks and an equal number of artillery pieces among the member nations. It was signed in a ceremony at a Hungarian government guest house.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic set to join NATO next month, a celebratory mood in these countries is tempered by their determination that the alliance not weaken its ability to defend members as it takes on new missions. The three nations will join the North Atlantic Treaty Organization on March 12 during a ceremony at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Mo.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moscow has tightened the taps on its much-touted "Friendship Pipeline," cutting oil deliveries to Eastern Europe and inflicting new strains on its troubled relations with erstwhile allies. The abrupt reductions depriving former Soviet satellites of as much as one-third of their regular fuel supplies have boosted both energy prices and anti-Soviet sentiment.
NEWS
December 15, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under a cold gray sky, U.S. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney stood shoulder to shoulder with his Czech counterpart here and watched as the grim and greatcoated soldiers of a former adversary goose-stepped past him. The ritual greeting by a friendly nation last week marked the start of the first visit ever by an American defense secretary to Prague and, with it, the end of an era in which Pentagon officials shunned Eastern European countries and demonized their militaries.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parliament announced Wednesday that a 40-man Hungarian army medical team is being readied for service in the Persian Gulf, and a five-hour secret session on "matters of national defense" fueled speculation that Hungarian airspace or bases might be used in the event of an attack on Iraq.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gearing up to go out of business, the six Warsaw Pact nations Saturday signed an agreement on how to share a pared-down inventory of tanks and artillery, the last major obstacle to a European conventional arms treaty that will be signed in Paris later this month. The agreement fixes distribution of 20,000 tanks and an equal number of artillery pieces among the member nations. It was signed in a ceremony at a Hungarian government guest house.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of Hungary's drift from the Kremlin's orbit, the newly elected Parliament on Wednesday applauded an opposition proposal that Hungary withdraw from the Warsaw Pact and suspend all military exercises with the alliance until the break can be formally negotiated. In another development, Defense Minister Gyorgy Karpathy confirmed reports that Hungary has sold Soviet-built MIG jets to the United States but denied that the sales disclosed any Soviet military secrets.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Miklos Nemeth said Friday that Hungary will slash its armed forces by up to 25% in the next two years, scrapping many offensive weapons and regrouping them away from its western frontier. He also announced a shake-up in the defense command, replacing the army chief of staff and dismissing three deputy ministers. The cuts in hardware and personnel are on top of a 9% reduction announced last January.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rogue business enterprise covertly sold to foreigners two high-tech items from the Soviet military arsenal, MIG-29 jet fighters and T-72 tanks, in "dirty and shameful" deals, according to the KGB, the state security agency. The latest chapter in arms sale scandals in the East Bloc was revealed in the agency's monthly publication, "KGB U.S.S.R."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|