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BUSINESS
September 26, 1989 | STUART AUERBACH, Washington Post
That bastion of capitalism, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, will sponsor a course in free enterprise at Karl Marx University in Budapest next year, chamber officials announced. "It can only make you raise your eyebrows--the Chamber of Commerce and Karl Marx University," commented Rozanne L. Ridgway, former assistant secretary of state for European affairs and president of the Atlantic Council.
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NEWS
June 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the minister of education announced last fall that the teaching of Russian was no longer compulsory in Hungarian schools, students celebrated by shredding their Russian textbooks. "Russian was forced on us," student Krisztina Karoly, 20, told a reporter recently. "It will always be considered the language of oppression." She said that English is "suddenly very fashionable, but there is a big shortage of teachers."
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NEWS
July 13, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
As President Bush extolled the virtues of capitalism Wednesday at Karl Marx University of Economics, some professors recalled the not-so-distant past, when the school offered a class in bourgeois economics--and "profits" was a term synonymous with worker exploitation. "At that time it was impossible to criticize the socialist planned economy," said Mihaly Simai, who began teaching at Karl Marx in 1953.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1989 | STUART AUERBACH, Washington Post
That bastion of capitalism, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, will sponsor a course in free enterprise at Karl Marx University in Budapest next year, chamber officials announced. "It can only make you raise your eyebrows--the Chamber of Commerce and Karl Marx University," commented Rozanne L. Ridgway, former assistant secretary of state for European affairs and president of the Atlantic Council.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the minister of education announced last fall that the teaching of Russian was no longer compulsory in Hungarian schools, students celebrated by shredding their Russian textbooks. "Russian was forced on us," student Krisztina Karoly, 20, told a reporter recently. "It will always be considered the language of oppression." She said that English is "suddenly very fashionable, but there is a big shortage of teachers."
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
As President Bush extolled the virtues of capitalism Wednesday at Karl Marx University of Economics, some professors recalled the not-so-distant past, when the school offered a class in bourgeois economics--and "profits" was a term synonymous with worker exploitation. "At that time it was impossible to criticize the socialist planned economy," said Mihaly Simai, who began teaching at Karl Marx in 1953.
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