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NEWS
October 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization told three former Communist countries negotiating membership that they would have to bear most of the cost of joining. Alliance defense ministers met with their counterparts from Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary.
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NEWS
March 14, 1990
In response to "Housing Relief With the Two-Step," editorial, March 7: Fannie Mae's new two-step mortgage, ostensibly created to help first-time home buyers qualify for a loan, does virtually nothing to solve the high-price problems of our housing market. It also sets up for a real debacle seven years from now when the new interest rates are incorporated. I would suggest that the new loan might even exacerbate the high-price problem. The real problem is high prices, not ease of financing.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1995 | SAM LOEWENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Sam Loewenberg is a free-lance writer based in Budapest
Long the economic leader of the former Eastern Bloc, Hungary suddenly finds itself in the throes of a painful retrenchment while its government beats down suggestions that it is becoming the Mexico of Eastern Europe. Although Hungary has drawn nearly half the foreign investment in the region since 1989, huge foreign debts and a massive budget deficit forced the government on March 12 to announce an immediate 9% currency devaluation and deep cuts in social welfare benefits.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Hungarian government to be named this month should immediately slash food and rent subsidies and impose other harsh but effective measures if it wants to attract the foreign money needed to rescue the economy, an international panel advised Friday. In a report timed to coincide with Sunday's final election round that will determine the next government, Western and Hungarian economists have outlined what they see as the most urgent measures needed to speed the transition to capitalism.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Lending by the World Bank, the biggest source of aid to the Third World, has declined in the past 12 months for the first time since 1985, the bank reported Thursday. The decrease was partly because of a reduction in loans to China after tanks rolled into Tian An Men Square last year. Figures for the bank's year, which runs from July 1 to June 30, were made public by Moeen A. Qureshi, a Pakistani who is the bank's senior vice president for operations.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Parliament on Thursday voted to dissolve itself in March, thus paving the way for the first free elections in the country in more than four decades. In a roll call vote, 320 deputies voted to end Parliament's mandate on March 16. There were two abstentions and no votes against. The house also adopted the government's budget for 1990, which foresees strict austerity measures recommended by the International Monetary Fund.
NEWS
October 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization told three former Communist countries negotiating membership that they would have to bear most of the cost of joining. Alliance defense ministers met with their counterparts from Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1995 | SAM LOEWENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Sam Loewenberg is a free-lance writer based in Budapest
Long the economic leader of the former Eastern Bloc, Hungary suddenly finds itself in the throes of a painful retrenchment while its government beats down suggestions that it is becoming the Mexico of Eastern Europe. Although Hungary has drawn nearly half the foreign investment in the region since 1989, huge foreign debts and a massive budget deficit forced the government on March 12 to announce an immediate 9% currency devaluation and deep cuts in social welfare benefits.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Lending by the World Bank, the biggest source of aid to the Third World, has declined in the past 12 months for the first time since 1985, the bank reported Thursday. The decrease was partly because of a reduction in loans to China after tanks rolled into Tian An Men Square last year. Figures for the bank's year, which runs from July 1 to June 30, were made public by Moeen A. Qureshi, a Pakistani who is the bank's senior vice president for operations.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Hungarian government to be named this month should immediately slash food and rent subsidies and impose other harsh but effective measures if it wants to attract the foreign money needed to rescue the economy, an international panel advised Friday. In a report timed to coincide with Sunday's final election round that will determine the next government, Western and Hungarian economists have outlined what they see as the most urgent measures needed to speed the transition to capitalism.
NEWS
March 14, 1990
In response to "Housing Relief With the Two-Step," editorial, March 7: Fannie Mae's new two-step mortgage, ostensibly created to help first-time home buyers qualify for a loan, does virtually nothing to solve the high-price problems of our housing market. It also sets up for a real debacle seven years from now when the new interest rates are incorporated. I would suggest that the new loan might even exacerbate the high-price problem. The real problem is high prices, not ease of financing.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
Parliament on Thursday voted to dissolve itself in March, thus paving the way for the first free elections in the country in more than four decades. In a roll call vote, 320 deputies voted to end Parliament's mandate on March 16. There were two abstentions and no votes against. The house also adopted the government's budget for 1990, which foresees strict austerity measures recommended by the International Monetary Fund.
NEWS
December 31, 1995 | LARRY THORSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the vibrant center of Budapest, cafes are crowded with businessmen chattering into cellular phones during working breakfasts. Manhattan on the Danube. But, in a rustic tavern nearby, there's an exotic touch of Transylvania, with musicians trading mournful riffs over a bottle of Tokay wine. The old still mixes with the new as Hungary and its Central European neighbors strive for more identification with the West and struggle for free-market economies after decades under Moscow's hard thumb.
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