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February 2, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
South Korea and Hungary established full diplomatic relations Wednesday, marking a diplomatic milestone in the Seoul government's courtship of rival North Korea's socialist allies. The Hungarian minister of state for foreign affairs, Gyula Horn, said he hopes that the move, which had been widely anticipated since Hungary became the first Communist state to set up a trade office here last year, will not change his country's relations with North Korea.
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February 2, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
South Korea and Hungary established full diplomatic relations Wednesday, marking a diplomatic milestone in the Seoul government's courtship of rival North Korea's socialist allies. The Hungarian minister of state for foreign affairs, Gyula Horn, said he hopes that the move, which had been widely anticipated since Hungary became the first Communist state to set up a trade office here last year, will not change his country's relations with North Korea.
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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SAM JAMESON and KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writers
In the first sign that South Korea's contacts with Communist nations may expand dramatically after the Seoul Olympics, Hungary and South Korea announced Tuesday that they will establish diplomatic relations within two months. At the same time in Tokyo, Japan moved to calm fears about terrorism at the Summer Games, which open Saturday, by announcing that it will lift sanctions imposed on North Korea after its agents were blamed in the bombing of a South Korean airliner last November.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Until recently, South Korea did not exist as far as the Communist world was concerned. As the Communists saw it, there was only one Korea, and that was North Korea. They supported it militarily, economically and diplomatically. But much has changed over the past six months. Three Communist countries--including the Soviet Union, which announced the action Saturday--have set up trade offices in Seoul and allowed South Korea to do the same in their capitals.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Until recently, South Korea did not exist as far as the Communist world was concerned. As the Communists saw it, there was only one Korea, and that was North Korea. They supported it militarily, economically and diplomatically. But much has changed over the past six months. Three Communist countries--including the Soviet Union, which announced the action Saturday--have set up trade offices in Seoul and allowed South Korea to do the same in their capitals.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SAM JAMESON and KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writers
In the first sign that South Korea's contacts with Communist nations may expand dramatically after the Seoul Olympics, Hungary and South Korea announced Tuesday that they will establish diplomatic relations within two months. At the same time in Tokyo, Japan moved to calm fears about terrorism at the Summer Games, which open Saturday, by announcing that it will lift sanctions imposed on North Korea after its agents were blamed in the bombing of a South Korean airliner last November.
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