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NEWS
April 11, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of national pride that carried Joszef Antall and his Hungarian Democratic Forum to victory reflect a conservative sweep across Eastern Europe as Moscow's former satellites realign themselves toward the West. But the center-right Forum's success in striking an anti-leftist chord in an electorate long suppressed by socialism may prove difficult to duplicate among the strong liberal and leftist opposition it will face in Parliament.
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NEWS
August 5, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ferenc Madl, a conservative law professor who once taught at UC Berkeley, was inaugurated as Hungary's second president since the fall of communism. Madl, elected by parliament in June, succeeded Arpad Goncz, who had served the maximum two terms in the largely ceremonial post. Madl was a power broker who helped develop the right-wing coalition that ousted a Socialist-led government in 1998. In his address, he said Hungary needed to take care of the poor and improve educational opportunity.
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NEWS
April 11, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Name-calling and professional back-stabbing surrounding the recall of Budapest's ambassador to Washington have transformed the normally lackluster Hungarian political scene into a veritable soap opera this week. Envoy Peter Zwack, who gave up his U.S. citizenship only seven months ago to accept the most prestigious foreign posting his native Hungary has to offer, has taken more than a few parting shots since being informed that his services are no longer desired.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | From Reuters
Parliament on Tuesday elected Peter Boross, a conservative with a reputation for toughness and efficiency, as Hungary's next prime minister. Boross, 65, succeeds the late Jozsef Antall. His endorsement by a vote of 201 to 152 with five abstentions marked a practically seamless transfer of power that political leaders said was designed to ensure continuity in Hungary's march toward free-market democracy.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | From the Washington Post
A senior Hungarian official said Monday it is time to begin "creating conditions" that could facilitate a historic shift of Hungary out of the Soviet-dominated Warsaw Pact alliance. Matyas Szuros, newly elected Speaker of the Hungarian Parliament, told Washington Post editors and reporters that he envisages such an eventual shift "within a climate of trust" between Hungary and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | Reuters
Parliament instructed Hungary's first post-Communist government Tuesday to negotiate the country's withdrawal from the Warsaw Pact. By a vote of 232 to 0, with four abstentions, Parliament endorsed moves initiated by the government taken earlier to leave the organization by late 1991.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The chief prosecutor's office in Budapest ordered an investigation of former Hungarian officials who may have supported the notorious "Carlos" in conducting terrorist acts in the 1970s and 1980s, the news agency MTI said.
NEWS
May 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joszef Antall, the man who will guide Hungary through the troubled waters of a new democracy, appeals to worried Hungarians with an aura of paternal authority and a commitment to restoring national pride. Like his countrymen, Antall was obliged to retreat after the failed 1956 effort to expel communism and forced to wait for the next chance, like a prisoner intent on escape.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the cavernous Interior Ministry building on Roosevelt Square, where the carpeted halls once teemed with furtive secret police and frenzied bureaucrats, a lone secretary waters drooping plants in echoing emptiness and waits to learn who will be her new boss. Across the square, at the Forum and Hyatt hotels, Western investors and Hungarian entrepreneurs crowd the lobbies and bars, nursing along completed business deals they hope won't fall through before an official is in place to approve them.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Janos Kadar's last stand was the spectacle of an old Communist holding out to the end. The aging Hungarian leader's hands fluttered through the mussed pages of his last speech, his place lost. He rambled on, falling back on murky parables and childhood memories of village sweet shops. The speech that was designed as a last defense turned out to be the final unraveling of his rule.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Up to 15,000 protesters called for Prime Minister Jozsef Antall's resignation, charging the government is led by former Communists who are unable to halt the nation's economic slide. Rising unemployment and double-digit inflation have fed anti-government sentiment, but the turnout in Budapest was far below the 100,000 predicted by organizers. "Antall must go!' the crowd chanted outside Parliament.
NEWS
April 11, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Name-calling and professional back-stabbing surrounding the recall of Budapest's ambassador to Washington have transformed the normally lackluster Hungarian political scene into a veritable soap opera this week. Envoy Peter Zwack, who gave up his U.S. citizenship only seven months ago to accept the most prestigious foreign posting his native Hungary has to offer, has taken more than a few parting shots since being informed that his services are no longer desired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tibor Toczauer stood in the warm morning sun at MacArthur Park on Saturday and reflected on the good luck he and his fellow Hungarian-Americans were about to experience. "Up until this last week, I couldn't believe we would be this fortunate," Toczauer said, referring to the impending arrival of Hungary's prime minister, Jozsef Antall.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Jozsef Antall doesn't believe in sugar-coating the truth when describing the woeful state of the nation he governs. In a three-hour interview Monday, Antall ticked off every depressing detail of the Hungarian economy and likened his leadership task to that of Moses. Inflation and unemployment are spiraling upward while 90% of industry is still owned by the state, he pointed out.
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the Hungarian people who boldly punched the first hole in the Iron Curtain a year ago, democracy has so far been something of a disappointment. Frustration with worsening living conditions and disillusionment with the new non-Communist leadership were visible Monday in unofficial results trickling in from local elections held a day earlier.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's Socialists lost their bid for a political comeback Sunday when voters killed a referendum on direct presidential elections by failing to go to the polls. Coming at the height of summer vacation season and on a brilliantly sunny day with temperatures in the 90s, the issue opposed by Hungary's main political parties had been considered to have little chance of passage. Less than 14% of the country's 7.
NEWS
August 23, 1989
Hungarian Communist Party General Secretary Karoly Grosz, a centrist who has lost ground recently to reformists, hinted he will step down. Grosz did not specifically say he would resign, but the official MTI news agency reported that he did not contradict a reporter for the party daily Nepszabadsag who asked why he intended to "leave the political scene." Grosz replied: "Many people want to believe that the main cause of the current problems is the power struggle within the party.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Reformers in Hungary's newly reorganized and renamed ruling party pushed through a leadership slate dominated by liberals Monday. But it took a serious threat to bolt the party--and the specter of a disastrous three-way party split--in order for the reformers to carry the day.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new democratic leaders of Hungary are hoping that apathy emerges as the winner in a referendum Sunday that will determine whether the president is elected by the people or appointed by Parliament. The referendum, called reluctantly by officials bored by the prospect of another election, asks voters to go to the polls for the fourth time in eight months to settle an issue that could be labeled the Socialists' last stand. Unless at least half of Hungary's 7.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The chief prosecutor's office in Budapest ordered an investigation of former Hungarian officials who may have supported the notorious "Carlos" in conducting terrorist acts in the 1970s and 1980s, the news agency MTI said.
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