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BUSINESS
August 27, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Levis, the jeans that epitomized capitalistic decadence here in the 1960s, stand for socialist success in the late 1980s. Just a half hour's drive from the Yugoslavian border, about 200 Hungarian factory workers--most of them women--assemble, wash and iron 3,000 pairs of jeans each day as the rock beat of Madonna blasts over the radio in the plant. This is Levi Strauss Budapest Co., a $1-million business venture with Skala-Tex Clothing & Trade, Centrum Dept. Stores Co.
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NEWS
April 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Hungarian government to be named this month should immediately slash food and rent subsidies and impose other harsh but effective measures if it wants to attract the foreign money needed to rescue the economy, an international panel advised Friday. In a report timed to coincide with Sunday's final election round that will determine the next government, Western and Hungarian economists have outlined what they see as the most urgent measures needed to speed the transition to capitalism.
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NEWS
April 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Hungarian government to be named this month should immediately slash food and rent subsidies and impose other harsh but effective measures if it wants to attract the foreign money needed to rescue the economy, an international panel advised Friday. In a report timed to coincide with Sunday's final election round that will determine the next government, Western and Hungarian economists have outlined what they see as the most urgent measures needed to speed the transition to capitalism.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
In their ardor to court foreign investment, trade officials here tout their country's cheap labor and desire for Western-style management. U.S. firms certainly cannot complain about labor costs--many of their workers earn about $160 (10,000 forints) a month--plus they face none of the union headaches that plague firms at home. And Hungarian managers are enthusiastically embracing capitalist techniques. They are flocking to a Western business college that just opened in a Budapest suburb.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
In their ardor to court foreign investment, trade officials here tout their country's cheap labor and desire for Western-style management. U.S. firms certainly cannot complain about labor costs--many of their workers earn about $160 (10,000 forints) a month--plus they face none of the union headaches that plague firms at home. And Hungarian managers are enthusiastically embracing capitalist techniques. They are flocking to a Western business college that just opened in a Budapest suburb.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1992 | Cristina Lee, Times staff writer
Wine Opportunities: On the European front, the World Trade Center Assn. of Orange County is leading a team of experts from California's wine industry to study business opportunities for U.S. companies to invest in Hungary's wine industry.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This East European nation took a major step along the capitalist road Thursday with a splashy reopening of the Budapest Stock Exchange, where the "big board" can display only five listings and where Hungarian buyers, who have no checkbooks, pay with satchels full of cash. The rebirth of Western-style trading after a 42-year shutdown was highlighted by listing of the state-owned Ibusz travel network, the first major Hungarian enterprise to begin privatization with a public share issue.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
One cool spring day in 1980, Janos Vargha, a biologist-turned-journalist, visited a village on the Danube and was asked a question that would alter politics in Hungary forever. Vargha, 44, had been sent to report on pristine wetlands along the river's banks. But the townspeople had a more pressing topic on their minds. "What about the dam?" they asked Vargha, clustering around him anxiously. "What dam?" he responded. Vargha soon found out.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | DAVID GRITTEN
It looks for all the world like a large-scale Hollywood epic--the kind they just don't make any more. The scene is Casablanca, 1942, as evinced by the sun's glare and the palm trees lining a sandy desert clearing. On a stage which represents a club for GIs, actress Lynn Whitfield, playing the legendary black entertainer Josephine Baker, sings a moving song in French to an audience of wildly applauding American soldiers, 350 of them white and some 100 black.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ryszard Puchala is camping out in a mile-long line at the government-owned cement factory, waiting three days to buy raw materials for his construction business. It may not be worth the trouble. So sour is the economy of Poland's countryside that most of the local farmers cannot afford Puchala's services anyway. Times are tougher still at the other end of Eastern Europe, where Romania is trying desperately to inject Western investment into its foundering economy.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Levis, the jeans that epitomized capitalistic decadence here in the 1960s, stand for socialist success in the late 1980s. Just a half hour's drive from the Yugoslavian border, about 200 Hungarian factory workers--most of them women--assemble, wash and iron 3,000 pairs of jeans each day as the rock beat of Madonna blasts over the radio in the plant. This is Levi Strauss Budapest Co., a $1-million business venture with Skala-Tex Clothing & Trade, Centrum Dept. Stores Co.
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