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NEWS
December 9, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The Eastern European response Thursday to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's plan for troop reductions in Warsaw Pact nations ranged from a cautious expression of "understanding" in Czechoslovakia to enthusiasm in Hungary. Gorbachev announced Wednesday that, as part of an overall Soviet armed forces reduction of 500,000 troops in the next two years, 50,000 troops and 5,000 tanks will be withdrawn from Eastern Europe.
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NEWS
June 9, 1990 | From Reuters
This nation wants to leave the Warsaw Pact by late 1991 and will not take part in its military exercises this year, Defense Minister Lajos Fur said Friday. He said Soviet Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov seemed to accept the Hungarian position but that the idea seemed "quite repulsive" to the supreme military leaders of the Warsaw Pact. Hungary tried to leave the Warsaw Pact at the height of the 1956 uprising against Soviet domination, but was thwarted by an invasion of Soviet tanks.
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NEWS
July 18, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's success at the recent Communist Party conference, particularly the proposed presidential system that would place him at the head of a powerful government as well as the Communist Party, strengthens his pursuit of a key goal: dispelling the West's perception that the Soviet Union poses a military threat. Although Gorbachev convened the conference to deal with domestic affairs, U.S.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Reuters
The Soviet Union reached agreement with Hungary on Friday to withdraw all its troops from Hungary by the middle of 1991, after having them there "temporarily" since the end of World War II, the Hungarian MTI news agency said. In a report from Moscow, it said withdrawal of the 50,000 troops will begin next Monday and be finished by June 30, 1991.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the Warsaw Pact ended a meeting here Saturday with no new proposals for reducing conventional arms in Europe and, according a Foreign Ministry official, without discussing withdrawal of Soviet forces from Hungary. A U.S. State Department briefing last week suggested that the Kremlin was considering the withdrawal of some or all of its 65,000 troops stationed in Hungary. The Warsaw Pact meeting concluded a six-day visit to Poland by Soviet leader Mikhail S.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's proposal for accelerated superpower troop cuts in Central Europe is "a step in the right direction" and the Soviet Union is ready to talk more about it, Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov said Thursday. However, he added, "it is not a good sign" that the Bush Administration appears to have ruled out for now even deeper manpower cuts on the Continent.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | Reuters
The Soviet Union reached agreement with Hungary on Friday to withdraw all its troops from Hungary by the middle of 1991, after having them there "temporarily" since the end of World War II, the Hungarian MTI news agency said. In a report from Moscow, it said withdrawal of the 50,000 troops will begin next Monday and be finished by June 30, 1991.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | From Reuters
This nation wants to leave the Warsaw Pact by late 1991 and will not take part in its military exercises this year, Defense Minister Lajos Fur said Friday. He said Soviet Defense Minister Dmitri T. Yazov seemed to accept the Hungarian position but that the idea seemed "quite repulsive" to the supreme military leaders of the Warsaw Pact. Hungary tried to leave the Warsaw Pact at the height of the 1956 uprising against Soviet domination, but was thwarted by an invasion of Soviet tanks.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's proposal for accelerated superpower troop cuts in Central Europe is "a step in the right direction" and the Soviet Union is ready to talk more about it, Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov said Thursday. However, he added, "it is not a good sign" that the Bush Administration appears to have ruled out for now even deeper manpower cuts on the Continent.
NEWS
December 9, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The Eastern European response Thursday to Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's plan for troop reductions in Warsaw Pact nations ranged from a cautious expression of "understanding" in Czechoslovakia to enthusiasm in Hungary. Gorbachev announced Wednesday that, as part of an overall Soviet armed forces reduction of 500,000 troops in the next two years, 50,000 troops and 5,000 tanks will be withdrawn from Eastern Europe.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev's success at the recent Communist Party conference, particularly the proposed presidential system that would place him at the head of a powerful government as well as the Communist Party, strengthens his pursuit of a key goal: dispelling the West's perception that the Soviet Union poses a military threat. Although Gorbachev convened the conference to deal with domestic affairs, U.S.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of the Warsaw Pact ended a meeting here Saturday with no new proposals for reducing conventional arms in Europe and, according a Foreign Ministry official, without discussing withdrawal of Soviet forces from Hungary. A U.S. State Department briefing last week suggested that the Kremlin was considering the withdrawal of some or all of its 65,000 troops stationed in Hungary. The Warsaw Pact meeting concluded a six-day visit to Poland by Soviet leader Mikhail S.
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