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Hungary Revolts

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NEWS
September 26, 1989
Hungary, which recently revised its official interpretation of the 1956 uprising crushed by Soviet troops, will offer compensation to those sentenced to prison terms as a result of activities during the revolt, the official news agency MTI said. The government decision will affect about 22,000 people, it said. Those sentenced to less than one year will receive a monthly supplement of $8.30 to their retirement pension. Those who served longer terms will get another $4.
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NEWS
January 7, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of Eastern Europe is keeping a wary eye on events in Russia, the greatest danger to this nation's security emanates from what used to be its own territory. In the current atmosphere of rabid nationalism and Western tolerance of forced border changes in the Balkans, suspicions have soared in the countries surrounding Hungary that it may seek the kind of ethnic reunion being brutally accomplished by the Serbs.
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NEWS
February 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Communist Party chief Karoly Grosz said Saturday that the party's leadership has endorsed a multi-party system but will continue to reassess a key chapter in Hungary's history--the 1956 anti-Soviet revolt. The Central Committee, split between hard-liners and reformers, ended a special two-day session aimed primarily at assessing the emotionally and politically significant revolt.
NEWS
September 26, 1989
Hungary, which recently revised its official interpretation of the 1956 uprising crushed by Soviet troops, will offer compensation to those sentenced to prison terms as a result of activities during the revolt, the official news agency MTI said. The government decision will affect about 22,000 people, it said. Those sentenced to less than one year will receive a monthly supplement of $8.30 to their retirement pension. Those who served longer terms will get another $4.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
In a startling contradiction of the official view of history, a member of the ruling Communist Party Politburo said on Saturday that the 1956 Hungarian Revolution was a popular uprising, not a counterrevolution. Imre Pozsgay became the first Hungarian leader to publicly contradict the official view that the revolution, which was suppressed by Soviet tanks and troops, was a foreign-instigated counterrevolution designed to subvert the Communist system.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of Eastern Europe is keeping a wary eye on events in Russia, the greatest danger to this nation's security emanates from what used to be its own territory. In the current atmosphere of rabid nationalism and Western tolerance of forced border changes in the Balkans, suspicions have soared in the countries surrounding Hungary that it may seek the kind of ethnic reunion being brutally accomplished by the Serbs.
OPINION
June 11, 1989 | Endre Marton, Endre Marton covered the 1956 revolution as an Associated Press correspondent, after 18 months in prison on a conviction for treason and espionage. He is the author of "The Forbidden Sky" (Little, Brown)
In many ways, Hungary's future may well be set by what happens next Friday, the 30th anniversary of the Soviet execution of Premier Imre Nagy and three of his collaborators. On that day, June 16, their remains will be exhumed from unmarked graves and solemnly eulogized on Heroes' Square. It will be Hungary's strongest reminder of how a taste of freedom was snuffed out three decades ago. Emotions will be palpable, and perhaps uncontainable. "We don't want another national tragedy"--meaning a new revolt--one of the regime's staunchest opponents told me. Though the ceremony itself is planned to be solemn, there will be all the ingredients of unrest.
OPINION
June 11, 1989 | Endre Marton, Endre Marton covered the 1956 revolution as an Associated Press correspondent, after 18 months in prison on a conviction for treason and espionage. He is the author of "The Forbidden Sky" (Little, Brown)
In many ways, Hungary's future may well be set by what happens next Friday, the 30th anniversary of the Soviet execution of Premier Imre Nagy and three of his collaborators. On that day, June 16, their remains will be exhumed from unmarked graves and solemnly eulogized on Heroes' Square. It will be Hungary's strongest reminder of how a taste of freedom was snuffed out three decades ago. Emotions will be palpable, and perhaps uncontainable. "We don't want another national tragedy"--meaning a new revolt--one of the regime's staunchest opponents told me. Though the ceremony itself is planned to be solemn, there will be all the ingredients of unrest.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
Communist Party chief Karoly Grosz said Saturday that the party's leadership has endorsed a multi-party system but will continue to reassess a key chapter in Hungary's history--the 1956 anti-Soviet revolt. The Central Committee, split between hard-liners and reformers, ended a special two-day session aimed primarily at assessing the emotionally and politically significant revolt.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
In a startling contradiction of the official view of history, a member of the ruling Communist Party Politburo said on Saturday that the 1956 Hungarian Revolution was a popular uprising, not a counterrevolution. Imre Pozsgay became the first Hungarian leader to publicly contradict the official view that the revolution, which was suppressed by Soviet tanks and troops, was a foreign-instigated counterrevolution designed to subvert the Communist system.
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