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October 27, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States has granted Hungary most-favored-nation trading status on a permanent basis. At a Rose Garden ceremony, President Bush said that Hungary has honored its pledge of economic and political reforms. He then signed documents that make Hungarian products available in the United States without major restrictions. Hungary already had the status on a conditional basis.
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NEWS
December 29, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new age in East European economics dawns Tuesday, when the nations of the Soviet trading club pack away the mirrors they have used to balance their checkbooks for four decades. It will be every new democracy for itself in 1991, when the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, or Comecon, starts keeping its books in real money, instead of the synthetic "transferable ruble" that has been its common, unconvertible currency for internal wheeling and dealing.
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NEWS
December 29, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new age in East European economics dawns Tuesday, when the nations of the Soviet trading club pack away the mirrors they have used to balance their checkbooks for four decades. It will be every new democracy for itself in 1991, when the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, or Comecon, starts keeping its books in real money, instead of the synthetic "transferable ruble" that has been its common, unconvertible currency for internal wheeling and dealing.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States has granted Hungary most-favored-nation trading status on a permanent basis. At a Rose Garden ceremony, President Bush said that Hungary has honored its pledge of economic and political reforms. He then signed documents that make Hungarian products available in the United States without major restrictions. Hungary already had the status on a conditional basis.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
The world's richest nations Tuesday appeared ready to commit themselves to at least an additional $650 million in emergency aid to ease economic turmoil in Poland and Hungary. While the figure represents a major increase in assistance so far pledged by mainly Western democracies to help the two beleaguered East Bloc nations, it falls far short of the two countries' own request for aid.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | From Times wire services
President Bush today granted a one-year extension of trade benefits to China and Hungary, based on their performance on human rights. In a notice to Congress, Bush said he is keeping the two countries on the list of nations that enjoy the "most favored nation" trading status. The designation protects these nations from higher tariffs that the United States imposes on countries it deems to have poor records on human rights and emigration. The Soviet Union, for example, does not have preferred trade status, but Bush has offered to grant that designation if Moscow formalizes its relaxed emigration policy.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, in a measure intended to lend badly needed U.S. financial support, announced Monday that Hungary will be granted two major trade concessions as it undertakes extensive political and economic reforms.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1989 | From Times wire services
President Bush today extended most-favored-nation trade privileges to Hungary and made it the first country to be freed from a 1974 law denying U.S. trade credits to most Communist nations. Three days after Hungary declared itself a democracy, the President signed a series of proclamations in a Rose Garden ceremony exempting Hungary from the so-called Jackson-Vanik amendment. The action gives Hungary full access to U.S.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1991 | From Associated Press
Members of the Soviet-led trading bloc Comecon needed only 15 minutes Friday to terminate an organization that regulated trade among the former communist countries for 42 years. The signing of a document formalizing the end of the organization "reflects the historical changes under way in the region," said Bela Kadar, Hungary's foreign trade minister. He earlier welcomed representatives to what he termed "a short, but historically significant event."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2007 | From Times staff and wire reports
Philip M. Kaiser, a former ambassador to Austria, Hungary and Senegal who during the Cuban missile crisis acted to deny the Soviet Union landing rights at airports where Russian planes might refuel, died Thursday of aspiration pneumonia at Sibley Hospital in Washington, D.C., his family said. He was 93. A former assistant secretary of Labor during the Truman administration, Kaiser served as the U.S. ambassador to the West African countries of Senegal and Mauritania from 1961 to 1964.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1989 | From Times wire services
President Bush today extended most-favored-nation trade privileges to Hungary and made it the first country to be freed from a 1974 law denying U.S. trade credits to most Communist nations. Three days after Hungary declared itself a democracy, the President signed a series of proclamations in a Rose Garden ceremony exempting Hungary from the so-called Jackson-Vanik amendment. The action gives Hungary full access to U.S.
NEWS
September 27, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
The world's richest nations Tuesday appeared ready to commit themselves to at least an additional $650 million in emergency aid to ease economic turmoil in Poland and Hungary. While the figure represents a major increase in assistance so far pledged by mainly Western democracies to help the two beleaguered East Bloc nations, it falls far short of the two countries' own request for aid.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, in a measure intended to lend badly needed U.S. financial support, announced Monday that Hungary will be granted two major trade concessions as it undertakes extensive political and economic reforms.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | From Times wire services
President Bush today granted a one-year extension of trade benefits to China and Hungary, based on their performance on human rights. In a notice to Congress, Bush said he is keeping the two countries on the list of nations that enjoy the "most favored nation" trading status. The designation protects these nations from higher tariffs that the United States imposes on countries it deems to have poor records on human rights and emigration. The Soviet Union, for example, does not have preferred trade status, but Bush has offered to grant that designation if Moscow formalizes its relaxed emigration policy.
NEWS
March 26, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
This country, with the Soviet Bloc's freest economy and highest standard of living, opened a policy-making Communist Party congress Monday with pledges to continue the liberalizing reforms that have brought a blossoming of private enterprise. Party leader Janos Kadar acknowledged that Hungary has fallen short of the goal set at the last party congress in 1980 to maintain the country's standard of living in the face of a worldwide recession.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flower-festooned Maypoles have sprouted in the wake of Communist Party propaganda posters as East Europeans have traded in hollow testimonials to labor for traditional May Day celebrations of new life after the long, barren winter. It is a change heavy with symbolism for those recently rid of an ideology that never took root.
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