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Hunger Pangs

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BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
McDonald's Corp. has mustered up healthful new food options, sparkling restaurant remodels and targeted marketing efforts. But satisfactory sales are still off the menu. The world's largest burger chain reported a 4% boost to $1.4 billion in second-quarter profit that missed Wall Street's forecasts. Same-store sales at U.S. restaurants open more than a year were down in June. Globally, McDonald's expects them to be flat in July. And at the rate it's going, the company's results for the rest of 2013 "are expected to remain challenged," Chief Executive Don Thompson said in a conference call with analysts Monday.
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BUSINESS
July 22, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
McDonald's Corp. has mustered up healthful new food options, sparkling restaurant remodels and targeted marketing efforts. But satisfactory sales are still off the menu. The world's largest burger chain reported a 4% boost to $1.4 billion in second-quarter profit that missed Wall Street's forecasts. Same-store sales at U.S. restaurants open more than a year were down in June. Globally, McDonald's expects them to be flat in July. And at the rate it's going, the company's results for the rest of 2013 "are expected to remain challenged," Chief Executive Don Thompson said in a conference call with analysts Monday.
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WORLD
August 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea is reportedly claiming that it has developed a new kind of noodle that makes people feel full longer than ordinary food. Choson Sinbo newspaper said that the noodle, made with a mixture of beans and corn, doesn't make people "feel a sense of hunger that generally comes soon after eating [ordinary] noodle." The Tokyo-based newspaper, considered a mouthpiece for the regime in Pyongyang, cited a North Korean research institute. It didn't elaborate on how the special noodle works or how long people who eat it can go without hunger pangs.
NEWS
October 4, 2010
Attention, dieters: You can cut all the calories you want to lose weight – but without enough sleep, you won’t be losing the right kind. According to a study published online Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine , cutting your time in bed from 8.5 hours to 5.5 hours causes you to lose proportionally less fat. Ten overweight dieters who cut their caloric intake by 10% lost a comparable amount of weight – about 3 kilograms, or 6.6 pounds – but the type of weight they lost was very different, depending on how long they slept.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2008 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
For those unfamiliar with the Pang brothers' audacious 1999 "Bangkok Dangerous," the new version starring Nicolas Cage will seem like any other fast-food bullet ballet. Viewers who recall that original burst of adrenaline, however, will be left with hunger pangs. The two movies share a title, directors, character names -- and little else. Even the city in this edition feels less like the seamy, gritty, you-are-there Bangkok of the first film than some scrubbed, polished, Vegas notion of the Thai capital.
NEWS
October 4, 2010
Attention, dieters: You can cut all the calories you want to lose weight – but without enough sleep, you won’t be losing the right kind. According to a study published online Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine , cutting your time in bed from 8.5 hours to 5.5 hours causes you to lose proportionally less fat. Ten overweight dieters who cut their caloric intake by 10% lost a comparable amount of weight – about 3 kilograms, or 6.6 pounds – but the type of weight they lost was very different, depending on how long they slept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995
The Times' March 6 article on Julie Pearl and the "nearly 20 years . . . raising five children" on a welfare check once again puts the entire blame on women. When are the men going to be held accountable, tracked down and either made to pay or go to jail? Pearl did not impregnate herself, nor did thousands of other women. The men are allowed to leave or hang around to split the welfare dole. It will take men to find men responsible, rather than conveniently blame each and every pregnancy on poor and/or illiterate women.
NEWS
August 29, 2007 | Michael Tisserand, Michael Tisserand is the author of "Sugarcane Academy: How a New Orleans Teacher and His Storm-Struck Students Created a School to Remember."
On the last day of "Dr. Seuss week" at our New Orleans arts camp, my 6-year-old son proudly brought me his new cardboard house. He'd built it from shoe boxes and paper-towel rolls, topping his red-and-white-striped roof with a fantastic stovepipe chimney. A few days later, I took another look at his creation and noticed something else: He'd also taken a blue marker and drawn a wave around the walls and then carefully curved the line over the door. "That's Katrina," he explained to me.
SPORTS
September 25, 1986 | CHRIS COBBS, Times Staff Writer
The Killer doesn't get the urge as often these days. The hunger pangs just aren't there. Gary (Killer) Kowalski knows he needs to eat six square meals a day to maintain his weight at 280 pounds. But it's tough to stay on the proper diet during the season. After all, a guy can't send out for pizza during practice. Kowalski, the Chargers' right offensive tackle, has a metabolism that tends to keep him on the skinny side.
OPINION
March 12, 2009 | Sonni Efron, Sonni Efron, a former reporter and editorial writer at The Times, is a contributing editor to Opinion.
The economic crisis has now spread from Wall Street to Main Street to the places where there are no streets. In slums and shacks around the world, hunger is gnawing again as job opportunities shrink but food prices do not. Global cereal prices are 71% higher than they were in 2005, according to the International Monetary Fund, but the wages of many workers are falling. This is a disaster for the bottom billion, the one out of six humans living on less than $2 a day.
OPINION
March 12, 2009 | Sonni Efron, Sonni Efron, a former reporter and editorial writer at The Times, is a contributing editor to Opinion.
The economic crisis has now spread from Wall Street to Main Street to the places where there are no streets. In slums and shacks around the world, hunger is gnawing again as job opportunities shrink but food prices do not. Global cereal prices are 71% higher than they were in 2005, according to the International Monetary Fund, but the wages of many workers are falling. This is a disaster for the bottom billion, the one out of six humans living on less than $2 a day.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2008 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
For those unfamiliar with the Pang brothers' audacious 1999 "Bangkok Dangerous," the new version starring Nicolas Cage will seem like any other fast-food bullet ballet. Viewers who recall that original burst of adrenaline, however, will be left with hunger pangs. The two movies share a title, directors, character names -- and little else. Even the city in this edition feels less like the seamy, gritty, you-are-there Bangkok of the first film than some scrubbed, polished, Vegas notion of the Thai capital.
WORLD
August 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea is reportedly claiming that it has developed a new kind of noodle that makes people feel full longer than ordinary food. Choson Sinbo newspaper said that the noodle, made with a mixture of beans and corn, doesn't make people "feel a sense of hunger that generally comes soon after eating [ordinary] noodle." The Tokyo-based newspaper, considered a mouthpiece for the regime in Pyongyang, cited a North Korean research institute. It didn't elaborate on how the special noodle works or how long people who eat it can go without hunger pangs.
NEWS
August 29, 2007 | Michael Tisserand, Michael Tisserand is the author of "Sugarcane Academy: How a New Orleans Teacher and His Storm-Struck Students Created a School to Remember."
On the last day of "Dr. Seuss week" at our New Orleans arts camp, my 6-year-old son proudly brought me his new cardboard house. He'd built it from shoe boxes and paper-towel rolls, topping his red-and-white-striped roof with a fantastic stovepipe chimney. A few days later, I took another look at his creation and noticed something else: He'd also taken a blue marker and drawn a wave around the walls and then carefully curved the line over the door. "That's Katrina," he explained to me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1999 | STEVE HARVEY
Bobby Freed, 13, and his family visited a popular cafe in Santa Barbara, where the maitre d' announced they would have to wait an hour for a table. Young Mr. Freed, a veteran of several excursions to Magic Mountain and Disneyland, complained, "Geez, I can see waiting an hour--if there was a ride after it." SUCH A DEAL: For Labor Day weekend shopping, Only in L.A. has hunted up some real bargains (see accompanying).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999 | STEVE HARVEY
LAPD detectives found a "very large" snake left inside a locked vehicle for three days without food or water, but authorities declined to prosecute the owner. The reason, according to the Thin Blue Line, a publication of the L.A. Police Protective League, was that "snakes can go several days without food." * LETTER IMPERFECT: Writers are constantly claiming they get no respect in Hollywood. And they won't be reassured by an ad that misspells what they do (see accompanying).
NEWS
August 27, 1991
The South African government faces a crisis this week over the deteriorating condition of three right-wing prison inmates who have been on a hunger strike for more than a month, demanding that they be released under the government's indemnity program for political prisoners. The three were due to stand trial in October for bombing a Pretoria taxi rank, injurying 13 blacks, and for planting a computer bomb that killed a Durban computer technician. All contend their crimes were political.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1999 | STEVE HARVEY
Bobby Freed, 13, and his family visited a popular cafe in Santa Barbara, where the maitre d' announced they would have to wait an hour for a table. Young Mr. Freed, a veteran of several excursions to Magic Mountain and Disneyland, complained, "Geez, I can see waiting an hour--if there was a ride after it." SUCH A DEAL: For Labor Day weekend shopping, Only in L.A. has hunted up some real bargains (see accompanying).
SPORTS
February 6, 1999 | TRIS WYKES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Its competitive appetite whetted by the approach of the playoffs, the Reseda High boys' soccer team dismantled host Monroe, 4-1, Friday in a battle for first place in the Valley Pac-8 Conference. The victory, highlighted by Oscar Sims' two goals, gave the Regents (18-3-2, 9-1-2 in conference play) a two-point lead on the Vikings (8-2-2, 8-2-2) with two games remaining. The teams played to a scoreless tie Jan. 13 at Reseda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995
The Times' March 6 article on Julie Pearl and the "nearly 20 years . . . raising five children" on a welfare check once again puts the entire blame on women. When are the men going to be held accountable, tracked down and either made to pay or go to jail? Pearl did not impregnate herself, nor did thousands of other women. The men are allowed to leave or hang around to split the welfare dole. It will take men to find men responsible, rather than conveniently blame each and every pregnancy on poor and/or illiterate women.
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