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Hunger Strikes Los Angeles

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just wait until beleaguered Los Angeles gardeners get wind of Gody Sanchez's solution to the leaf blower controversy. It's a pollution-free, whisper-quiet leaf blower built from common car parts that may have enough power up its nozzle to sweep the blower ban debate right out of City Hall. Sanchez, a Van Nuys auto mechanic, surprised gardeners in the fifth day of a hunger strike outside the mayor's office when he showed up late Wednesday and strapped on his homemade leaf blower.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1998 | MATEA GOLD and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A group of gardeners on a hunger strike to protest Los Angeles' ban on gasoline-powered leaf blowers ended their seven-day fast on the City Hall lawn Friday after extracting written promises that city officials would help them find legal substitutes for the machines. The strike ended late in the afternoon after three City Council members visited the protesters in the makeshift tent city and delivered written pledges to hold hearings on finding alternatives to the gas-powered blowers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came to Los Angeles from small villages and large towns in Mexico to find one simple thing: work. But here, these immigrants have been drawn into a complex debate over how to strike a balance between one group's pursuit of economic opportunity and another's desire to protect what its members call their quality of life. It is a debate that has transformed gardeners into unlikely activists on the front lines of civic politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven hunger-striking gardeners continued their fast outside City Hall on Thursday after Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan signed the city's ban on gasoline-powered leaf blowers. In a late afternoon meeting with Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski, Councilman Mike Hernandez and members of the gardeners' group protesting the ban, the mayor said he would not veto the ordinance because if he did, an earlier, more stringent version of the law that includes jail time for violators would go into effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven hunger-striking gardeners continued their fast outside City Hall on Thursday after Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan signed the city's ban on gasoline-powered leaf blowers. In a late afternoon meeting with Councilwoman Cindy Miscikowski, Councilman Mike Hernandez and members of the gardeners' group protesting the ban, the mayor said he would not veto the ordinance because if he did, an earlier, more stringent version of the law that includes jail time for violators would go into effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1998 | MATEA GOLD and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A group of gardeners on a hunger strike to protest Los Angeles' ban on gasoline-powered leaf blowers ended their seven-day fast on the City Hall lawn Friday after extracting written promises that city officials would help them find legal substitutes for the machines. The strike ended late in the afternoon after three City Council members visited the protesters in the makeshift tent city and delivered written pledges to hold hearings on finding alternatives to the gas-powered blowers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tourists gawked, schoolchildren listened attentively and passersby continued about their business Friday as Cecilia Rodriguez made a fervent plea to boost public awareness of a bitter conflict that seemed far away from Olvera Street and the skyscrapers of Downtown Los Angeles. "We have to change people's consciousness," Rodriguez said in her soft voice, seated in front of an image of the ski-masked Mexican rebel leader known as Subcommander Marcos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came to Los Angeles from small villages and large towns in Mexico to find one simple thing: work. But here, these immigrants have been drawn into a complex debate over how to strike a balance between one group's pursuit of economic opportunity and another's desire to protect what its members call their quality of life. It is a debate that has transformed gardeners into unlikely activists on the front lines of civic politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just wait until beleaguered Los Angeles gardeners get wind of Gody Sanchez's solution to the leaf blower controversy. It's a pollution-free, whisper-quiet leaf blower built from common car parts that may have enough power up its nozzle to sweep the blower ban debate right out of City Hall. Sanchez, a Van Nuys auto mechanic, surprised gardeners in the fifth day of a hunger strike outside the mayor's office when he showed up late Wednesday and strapped on his homemade leaf blower.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tourists gawked, schoolchildren listened attentively and passersby continued about their business Friday as Cecilia Rodriguez made a fervent plea to boost public awareness of a bitter conflict that seemed far away from Olvera Street and the skyscrapers of Downtown Los Angeles. "We have to change people's consciousness," Rodriguez said in her soft voice, seated in front of an image of the ski-masked Mexican rebel leader known as Subcommander Marcos.
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