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Hunter S Thompson

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NEWS
December 9, 1996 | DAVID McCUMBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I have weird dreams," Hunter Stockton Thompson says. "I never expected to be looking over my life, page by page. It's like an animal eating its own intestines." It is 3:45 a.m. on a Tuesday morning, and he is perched like a barn owl on a high stool in his kitchen, eating not innards but a TV dinner, microwaved and then slathered with a hellbroth of mysterious mustards, chutneys and chili sauces. The plate suddenly glows with an unearthly light.
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SCIENCE
June 5, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
An ancient plant eating lizard that looked like an iguana but was closer in size to a German shepherd has been named after Jim Morrison, the late troubled and charismatic lead singer of the Doors. It is called  Barbaturex morissoni . The lizard's name was chosen by Jason Head, a paleontologist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a hard-core Doors fan since college. PHOTOS: 10 shocking facts about turtles "Morrison really liked lizards and snakes, and his lyrics and poetry used a lot of descriptions of ancient places," said Head.
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NEWS
October 19, 1995 | GREG TRINKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 25 years of self-imposed electoral exile, Hunter S. Thompson is again dropping matches into the petrol of Aspen politics. Fueled by twin November ballot proposals to upgrade the Aspen airport for larger aircraft--and by what he sees as the general degradation of his prized valley by "absentee landlord scum and greed-heads"--the father of gonzo journalism is back pillorying the Establishment.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Big and beefy with a scraggly beard, Shane Smith looks more like an aging roadie than a thrill-seeking foreign correspondent or a budding media mogul. But Smith is both those things. Vice Media Group, the company Smith co-founded and is chief executive of, has gone from a single magazine aimed at tattooed teeny-boppers to a media empire with more than 30 offices around the globe, a large digital presence, a record label, an advertising agency and a book publisher. The closely held Vice is projected to hit nearly $200 million in revenue this year and has a valuation approaching $1 billion, according to people close to the company.
NEWS
May 26, 2005 | From Associated Press
Plans for a public ceremony celebrating the life of Hunter S. Thompson have been canceled in favor of a private memorial service. The Aug. 20 ceremony, which will include the scattering of the author's ashes on his Aspen-area ranch, will coincide with the six-month anniversary of Thompson's death, said Doug Brinkley, one of the planners of the memorial.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times
Toward the end of "The Rum Diary," the film based on the Hunter S. Thompson novel, there's a scene that appears to come straight from the author's vintage work. Two journalists are sitting around a derelict San Juan, Puerto Rico, apartment, having just ingested an unknown hallucinogen. Nothing happens until one of them — a Thompson stand-in named Paul Kemp, played by Johnny Depp — sees the other's tongue start to grow out of his mouth like some tubular pink snake. Depp humps and haws, his mannerisms not unlike those he used when playing Thompson in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," a portrayal modeled closely on Thompson himself.
BOOKS
February 27, 2005 | Roberto Loiederman, Roberto Loiederman is co-author of "The Eagle Mutiny" and has written for The Times, the Baltimore Sun and other publications.
In the middle of Hunter S. Thompson's book "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," there's a scene that flashes back to San Francisco in the mid-1960s. After having gotten LSD from a street person, Thompson is in the men's room of a rock club trying to ingest the drug. The contents of the capsule spill onto the sleeve of his sweater, a long-haired musician walks in, sees what's going on and licks the drug off Thompson's sleeve.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Though "The Rum Diary" began as a semiautobiographical novel about a young journalist in Puerto Rico written by the pre-fame Hunter S. Thompson, in many ways the book also belongs very much to Johnny Depp. Depp came across the manuscript, begun in 1959 and not published until nearly 40 years later, while rummaging through Thompson's papers alongside the writer in the years before his death. And Depp now stars in and helped produce the film version of "The Rum Diary," opening Friday.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an apprentice reporter on the presidential trail in 1976, I remember reading about the previous campaign and the big dogs of political journalism. The book was Tim Crouse's "The Boys on the Bus." Toward the end, Crouse observed in passing that when reporters went home, their spouses would have to ask, "What was it really like?" This dangling question struck me as an awful thing to reveal about journalism, and it haunts me still. There was an exception back then, of course. Hunter S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2003 | Michael Simmons, Special to The Times
The great satirist Terry Southern once stated that the writer's duty is to astonish the reader. Hunter S. Thompson reliably fulfills this mandate with audacious and finely crafted storytelling, and one simply marvels in astonishment. Inhabiting a one-man's-land that blurs journalism and fiction and precludes nothing, Thompson creates no finer collections of written word. Such is his latest random memoir, "Kingdom of Fear."
HOME & GARDEN
September 8, 2012 | Chris Erskine
Sometimes what I think the Pulitzer committee is after, humor-wise, isn't just one epic exposé, as per last week's gem on rotten-tomato fights. It's a body of hard-hitting work. That's what leads me to this steamy parking garage in Burbank, looking for Deep Throat. My investigative partner is my buddy T-Bone (not his real name), who is also overdue for a Pulitzer, which is named - bet you didn't know this - for a St. Louis publisher responsible for some of the most exploitative journalism of all time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2011 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times
Toward the end of "The Rum Diary," the film based on the Hunter S. Thompson novel, there's a scene that appears to come straight from the author's vintage work. Two journalists are sitting around a derelict San Juan, Puerto Rico, apartment, having just ingested an unknown hallucinogen. Nothing happens until one of them — a Thompson stand-in named Paul Kemp, played by Johnny Depp — sees the other's tongue start to grow out of his mouth like some tubular pink snake. Depp humps and haws, his mannerisms not unlike those he used when playing Thompson in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," a portrayal modeled closely on Thompson himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Rum Diary," starring Johnny Depp as Paul Kemp, a thinly disguised young Hunter S. Thompson, chronicles the legendary journalist's booze-soaked months in 1960s' Puerto Rico in his pre-Gonzo days, when he was a writer still struggling to find his voice, worried that he might not actually have one. The voice issue is what troubles the film as well, but in more significant ways — Thompson found his, "Rum Diary" never does. That might have been a death sentence for the movie had not Depp been in such good form.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Though "The Rum Diary" began as a semiautobiographical novel about a young journalist in Puerto Rico written by the pre-fame Hunter S. Thompson, in many ways the book also belongs very much to Johnny Depp. Depp came across the manuscript, begun in 1959 and not published until nearly 40 years later, while rummaging through Thompson's papers alongside the writer in the years before his death. And Depp now stars in and helped produce the film version of "The Rum Diary," opening Friday.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2009 | Peter Y. Hong
Sometimes the truth hurts. Real estate salesman Jim Klinge doesn't care. Cruising through the sunny hills of Carlsbad in a massive silver Mercedes-Benz, he looks like any other pitchman of the California dream. But Klinge, 50, has become a notorious Internet chronicler of the real estate crash in north San Diego County, where he has lived and worked for decades. Rather than downplay the greed and excess that caused the region's travails, he revels in exposing them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2008 | Carolyn Kellogg, Kellogg is lead blogger for Jacket Copy, The Times' book blog.
How did Hunter S. Thompson capture the manic, drug-fueled energy of his reportorial pursuits? He was a mad genius, but he had help: He carried a tape recorder. Now, the recordings he made starting in California in 1965 and ending in Saigon in 1975 have been released for the first time in "The Gonzo Tapes: The Life and Work of Hunter S. Thompson," a five-CD set from Shout! Factory. Thompson's estate, including his son Juan and second wife, Anita, thought a CD release of the tapes would be a good idea after they cooperated for "Gonzo," the recent documentary film.
BOOKS
June 29, 1997 | PAUL KRASSNER, Paul Krassner is the publisher of the countercultural journal The Realist and the author of numerous books, including his latest collection of satiric sketches, "The Winner of the Slow Bicycle Race" now in paperback from Seven Stories Press. His album, "Brain Damage Control," will be released in July by Mercury Records
Imagine how Hunter Thompson might have covered the O.J. Simpson trial. Phil Bronstein, executive editor at the San Francisco Examiner, told me, "I thought Hunter would be the perfect person to write about the trial." They even met at a waterfront restaurant to discuss that possibility. "Hunter's face was all banged up," Bronstein recalled. "He claimed he had gone night-diving and scraped his face on a rock.
BOOKS
July 14, 1996 | John Balzar
"One of my clearest memories of the Nebraska primary is getting off the elevator on the wrong floor in the Omaha Hilton and hearing a sudden burst of song from a room down one of the hallways . . . 20 to 30 young voices in ragged harmony, kicking out the jams as they swung into the final hair-raising chorus. . . . I had heard it before, in other hallways of other hotels along the campaign trail--but never this late at night, and never at this level of howling intensity. . . . A very frightening song under any circumstances--but especially frightening if you happen to be a politician running for very high stakes and you know the people singing that song are not on your side.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Movie Critic
To make a documentary, you must be passionate about the subject. But too much admiration can lead to a film with more of a fan's view than is good for it. Such is the case with "Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson." Certainly there is a lot to admire about Thompson, a gifted writer who, along with Tom Wolfe and Gay Talese, is considered to be one of the founders of the style of writing called New Journalism, also known as creative non-fiction. And "Gonzo," directed by Alex Gibney, is filled to the top with admiring celebrities -- including Wolfe, singer Jimmy Buffett, and politicians such as former president Jimmy Carter and presidential candidate George McGovern -- offering encomiums to Thompson's talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2007 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
THIS is a sad book -- tragic, really. Here's an alternate subtitle: "How the Most Promising Writer of His Generation Blew His Gig." In giving us this "oral biography" of the late Hunter S. Thompson via recollections of friends and colleagues (the most thorough portrait of Thompson thus far, it is the sixth book about him and probably not the last), Rolling Stone founder Jann S.
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