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Hunting Season

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OPINION
October 22, 2000 | Robert G. Beckel, Robert G. Beckel, a political analyst, served as campaign manager for Walter F. Mondale in 1984
The Al Gore who wowed 'em at the Los Angeles Democratic convention last summer came out of hibernation at Tuesday's third and final presidential debate. Why his campaign has allowed Al "The Bear" Gore to duck and cover the last month is perplexing. But what is done is done. The bear is back, seal up his den and let him roam free to hunt his agile but much weaker prey, George W. "The Rabbit" Bush. Few politicians can reinvent themselves, particularly in a presidential race.
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BUSINESS
November 15, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
While most of the country will head routinely to work Friday, workers at General Motors Co., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Group will get the day off. Why? It's the start of deer-hunting season, a peculiar benefits quirk stemming from collective bargaining, corporate needs and Midwestern outdoors culture. During contract negotiations in the late 1990s, the automakers agreed to make Veterans Day a paid day off - but with a catch. The United Auto Workers didn't necessarily want to celebrate Veterans Day. Rather, its members wanted a flexible day off in November about the time hunting season starts.
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NEWS
July 5, 2005 | Hugo Martin
Duck populations in California jumped nearly 50% from last year, but conservationists warn global warming could shrink marshes and reduce waterfowl numbers in years to come. The Department of Fish and Game estimates 615,200 ducks inhabit the state, up from 412,800 last year. Mallards jumped 21% to nearly 317,900. State biologist Dan Yparraguirre credits duck-hunting restrictions for the rebound.
WORLD
February 15, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
They came from opposite directions, two avid hunters tracking the same wild boar. Neither knew the other was there. So when one noticed a flash of movement in a nearby bush, he fired two quick rounds ? adding the other man's name to the grim roll of those killed in pursuit of a deadly pastime. As Italy weighs up the tons of birds, hares and other game bagged over its official five-month hunting season, the country is facing the uncomfortable fact that enthusiasts fatally shot an alarming number of humans as well, at the rate of about one a week.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | ROGER SIMON
The herd must be thinned. The weakest, the slowest, the dumbest must be weeded out. And that is why we hunt. Unfortunately, however, it is not the weakest, slowest, dumbest deer that are being weeded out. It appears that it is the weakest, slowest and dumbest hunters who are dropping like flies. On the opening day of deer-hunting season in Maryland, for instance, 12 hunters were injured, 10 from gunshot wounds and two from falling out of trees.
SPORTS
August 29, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS
Battle lines were drawn when pro-hunting state legislators staged a rally on the capitol steps at Sacramento last week. The shooting will start when the dove season opens in the state Saturday. The rally was held on the day the Fish and Game Commission approved the dove hunt in the face of hunting opposition. It is California's second most popular hunt, after deer. An estimated 161,000 participated last year.
SPORTS
December 3, 1992 | MAL FLORENCE
Dexter Manley, a former Washington Redskin defensive end, has advice for players rushing a quarterback: "Shut your mouth." Manley told Sport magazine that he once drew a bead on Philadelphia Eagle quarterback Ron Jaworski, but he alerted Jaworski by screaming. "Jaworski ducked and I flew over his back," Manley said. "You don't want to scare him away. It's like a hunter not wanting to scare his deer. "But on that particular play against Philly, I screamed. I was like, 'I got one!' But I missed.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | RON WORD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the cool of the morning, when Gordon Vines takes to the woods, he has more on his mind than the game he might bag or the splendors of nature he is about to enjoy. He can't help but think about Gregory Alan Wood and Don Hill--two hunters who themselves became the hunted, gunned down in public deer hunting areas more than a year ago by an unknown assailant for unknown reasons.
WORLD
February 15, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
They came from opposite directions, two avid hunters tracking the same wild boar. Neither knew the other was there. So when one noticed a flash of movement in a nearby bush, he fired two quick rounds ? adding the other man's name to the grim roll of those killed in pursuit of a deadly pastime. As Italy weighs up the tons of birds, hares and other game bagged over its official five-month hunting season, the country is facing the uncomfortable fact that enthusiasts fatally shot an alarming number of humans as well, at the rate of about one a week.
NEWS
March 7, 1988
A decision on whether to allow the first sport-hunting of mountain lions since 1972 has been postponed a month by the California Fish and Game Commission. After listening to testimony--most of it against the proposed hunting season--the commission voted to delay a decision until April 8.
NATIONAL
October 27, 2009 | Kim Murphy
Montana officials on Monday ended the first-ever general wolf hunt in the southern part of the state, just a day after it started, when the number of animals killed exceeded the season quota for the region. The Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks earlier had suspended a backcountry hunt in a remote area north of Yellowstone National Park after nine gray wolves were shot. That hunt raised controversy because four of the wolves belonged to Yellowstone's much-studied Cottonwood pack -- including the alpha male and female.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Wildlife officials will consider changes to the state's inaugural wolf hunt after nine of the predators were shot in three weeks along the border of Yellowstone National Park. More than 1,300 gray wolves were removed from the endangered species list in Idaho and Montana this spring after a costly federal restoration effort. Hunting has been promoted as a way to keep the population in check and reduce wolf attacks on livestock. Hunters in the two states have killed at least 48 wolves since Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008 | Brenda Rees
This weekend, that venerable oval icon of spring, the Easter egg, will be scattered on lawns, hidden in museums and traditionally decorated. Here's where to go for some egg-cellent fun: "We tell people to get here early because [hunts] sell out," says Descanso Gardens docent Janet Gutkind about the daylong egg expeditions on Saturday, which draw more than 1,000 children. "You can feel the electric thrill at the gate when we yell, 'Go!' " 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., 1418 Descanso Drive, La Canada.
WORLD
November 6, 2005 | Vanora McWalters, Special to The Times
On Saturday mornings in autumn, the English gentleman's pleasure has long been to put on a bright red coat and ride out across the countryside on horseback, with a pack of friends in identical clothes at his side and a pack of hounds baying cheerfully ahead, chasing a friendless fox. This weekend, thousands of men and women in red did it again, joining 200 hunts around the countryside to mark the first Saturday of a new season. But this time there was a difference.
NEWS
July 5, 2005 | Hugo Martin
Duck populations in California jumped nearly 50% from last year, but conservationists warn global warming could shrink marshes and reduce waterfowl numbers in years to come. The Department of Fish and Game estimates 615,200 ducks inhabit the state, up from 412,800 last year. Mallards jumped 21% to nearly 317,900. State biologist Dan Yparraguirre credits duck-hunting restrictions for the rebound.
NEWS
September 7, 2004 | Steve Chapple
IT IS 5:37 IN THE MORNING BESIDE the canal, dark but for slivers of light from a bulging pre-harvest moon high above the saline slick of the Salton Sea. Shooting begins in 10 minutes, not counting overanxious pop-offs. Honeybees from hives scattered across the farmland bump into the hunters. By 10 the Imperial Valley heat will be enervating, by 11 oppressive, and by noon an eviscerating 112 degrees. That's good, though, because doves fly farther south when it dips below 70.
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | Associated Press
Four hunters were killed and at least 20 injured in accidents as Italy's hunting season opened, authorities reported today. In several regions environmentalists and hunters got into shouting matches when members of the Green Party played horns, drums and other noisy instruments to chase game away before the hunters arrived.
NEWS
September 10, 1989
Regarding "The Party Pace Picks Up During September" (by Jeannine Stein, Aug. 31): The social season in Los Angeles starts the first Friday of October when the Autumn Cotillion is held. This event, started over 50 years, ago brings together the socially prominent folks of Los Angeles who wouldn't be seen in Michael's and haven't yet decided if the opera is here to stay. By the time Cotillion comes around families are back from vacation, dove hunting season is just over and deer hunting season hasn't begun so the gentlemen of the city find no excuse not to attend.
NEWS
October 7, 2003 | Julie Sheer, Times Staff Writer
Ah, autumn. Hikers are treated to cooler temperatures, clean air and the gentle rustling of brightly hued leaves. And sometimes the sharp sound of a gunshot. With hunting season upon us, is it also open season on hikers? In California, the odds are in your favor when it comes to hunter safety -- although other states can't boast the same.
BOOKS
March 31, 2002
-- Southern CaliforniaRating FICTION Last Week Weeks on List -- -- 1 ATONEMENT by Ian McEwan (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: $26) A 4 2 haunting novel of guilt and redemption that follows several lives through the chaos of England in World War II 2 2nd CHANCE by James Patterson (Little, Brown: $26.95) The 2 3 Women's Murder Club is back on the case, looking to stop a racist killer who doesn't like cops 3 THE SUMMONS by John Grisham (Doubleday: $27.95) A man 1 6 discovers $3 million in his dead father's house and hides it from his prodigal brother and a mysterious extortioner 4 THE CORRECTIONS by Jonathan Franzen (Farrar, Straus & 3 29 Giroux: $26)
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