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NEWS
July 19, 2005 | Bill Becher
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service plans to expand hunting at two national wildlife refuges in California. Lands that were once used by a hunting club were added to Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge near Sacramento and would be open for public duck hunting from blinds. And hunting would be expanded to include half of the Sacramento River National Refuge; about 80% of the 10,326-acre unit would be open to fishing and wildlife viewing.
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SPORTS
September 8, 1990
Thanks so much for showing the picture of Gene Fuson of Hollywood with his huge shotgun and the tiny little bird he killed with it. It showed just what a wonderful "sport" dove hunting really is. LEILA McDERMOTT Granada Hills
BUSINESS
July 11, 2010 | By Scott Marshutz
The former hunting retreat that Southern California Edison's first president, John Barnes Miller, built around 1918 is for sale in unincorporated Claremont. Three miles up Webb Canyon Road, Trails End Ranch offers a rare glimpse of early California from its nearly 51 wilderness acres, which include live oak, scrub oak, redwood, olive, peach and pepper trees, to name a few. Although the single-level U-shaped, hacienda-style home was built before Los Angeles County started tracking building permits, a 1918 announcement by Southern California Edison said the company would construct a number of rustic redwood residences.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2003
NO animal should die for the sake of human pleasure, whether in the fur farm, in the slaughterhouse or on the hunting range ("Intelligent 'Hunting' Leaps Into the Fray," by Howard Rosenberg, June 16). Hunting is a purely cruel and pointless recreational activity that is morally reprehensible. There is nothing artistic or beautiful about the needless killing of animals. Anyone who appreciates the beauty of an animal must capture the beauty of the beast alone -- with a camera and not with a gun!
NATIONAL
August 28, 2010 | By Susan Cocking, Miami Herald
Roger McCulloch skipped a grizzly bear hunt in Alaska to drive 18 hours to Florida with one mission: shoot an alligator with bow and arrow. "I love gator hunting," said McCulloch, who owns an Ohio construction business. "It's just the rush of it. I've hunted everything — caribou, bear, elk. Gators are tough critters. " Special rules govern the bagging of gators. Hunters are not allowed to use guns. Instead, they may use a pole, spear, bow and arrow, or rod and reel to catch the animal, then use a bang stick — a pole with an explosive charge on the end — to dispatch it point-blank before bringing it into a boat.
SPORTS
August 17, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the year 2000, and things have settled down at the California Department of Fish. All hunting has been banned in the state since the old Department of Fish and Game lost its last case in court in the early 1990s. When Cleveland Amory became the new director, his first move was to strike half of the department's title. His second was to fire all the biologists who advocated killing any wildlife species--furry or feathered--as a management tool. There is no longer any game management.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
A quarter-million people poured into London on Sunday to protest a government they say threatens their rural way of life. From the grouse moors of Scotland and the green valleys of Wales and England, landowners and laborers, fox hunters and their opponents brought their diverse grievances to the capital in Britain's largest single demonstration since antinuclear marches in the early 1980s.
OPINION
December 15, 2001
Re "Loaded for Bear in the Southland Mountains," Dec. 10: I am appalled and saddened that big game hunting still exists in California, especially here in the Southland. California allows up to 1,500 bears to be killed annually, and hunters such as Bill La Haye kill innocent black bears simply for sport. How would La Haye and his comrades feel if they were hunted just for sport? I feel that the black bear and the rest of the forest's lovely creatures have a right to live in tranquillity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1988
Here it is, late spring in Orange County. Most wild animals, what are left of them, are raising newborn young. What does The Times commit in its Orange County Digest? An article with photo of our own urban mountain man with bow and bearskin. Though he professes to teach "respect for nature," he promotes in the same breath hunting with bow and arrow. Provides more of a challenge, he feels. Orange County's wildlife has been trampled by development, run over by traffic, shot year-round by poachers, young and old, and sometimes even legislated against.
OPINION
August 4, 2006
Re "Island Hunting Plan Misses Target," Aug. 3 The proposal by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-El Cajon) for a military hunting preserve is a selfish land grab for hunters like himself who want a pristine and publicly isolated area for their personal hunts. His use of the emotionally charged issue of disabled American veterans is nothing more than camouflage to attain that goal. If he is truly sincere about helping disabled vets who want to hunt, then he should propose setting aside some of the thousands of acres of federal forest that are for sale and create a refuge with the proper facilities that could accommodate disabled veterans' needs.
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