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Huntington Beach Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
The City Council, on a 7-0 vote, formally adopted the city's proposed two-year budget. The budget projected for next year totals more than $240 million, a boost of $7 million over this year. Despite plans to spend more money on city services through 2001, city staff estimates that residents will not be forced to pay more taxes or fees. But the budget does not take into account the anticipated $600-million shortfall for $1.2 billion in infrastructure needs over the next 20 years.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001
The Huntington Beach City Council has allocated about $4 million in state funds for a project to improve storm water systems that clean urban runoff before it reaches the coast. The funds, available through Proposition 13, will be used to develop a citywide water quality management plan to better track the levels and contents of storm water discharges and identify problem areas, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
The need for hiring additional city staff was a question most City Council members asked as the council wrapped up its final workshop on a proposed two-year budget. City Councilman Tom Harman wondered why the police department requested four more parking control officers. Police Chief Ron Lowenberg said they are needed to enforce parking restrictions for twice-a-month street sweeping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2000 | Kenneth Ma, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
On Tuesday, the City Council will hold a public hearing for its proposed fiscal 2001 budget. The $270-million budget plan provides funds for police, fire, recreation and city administrative services, and includes city employees' salaries. Also included in next year's budget are funds for nine new library positions, which include two full-time librarians to help patrons with questions regarding the Internet. The proposed budget is $20 million more than the 2000 budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001
The Huntington Beach City Council has allocated about $4 million in state funds for a project to improve storm water systems that clean urban runoff before it reaches the coast. The funds, available through Proposition 13, will be used to develop a citywide water quality management plan to better track the levels and contents of storm water discharges and identify problem areas, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
After sailing through a public hearing with just one call for better medians on Beach Boulevard, the City Council is set to adopt a $109-million operating budget next week. The budget--$213 million when capital funds such as water and sewer operations are added--is 1% higher than last year's and includes no new fees or taxes. At previous hearings on the city's spending, some residents urged the council to step up improvements to the water and sewer systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
A preliminary city budget for next year shows a deficit of $460,000, but officials say a proposed sewer fee could make up the shortfall and pay to repair broken and decaying waste-water lines. During a workshop Monday, City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga told the City Council he requested status-quo budgets from all city departments for 1997-98. But budget requests totaled about $101.6 million, up $4.5 million from this year's budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Using examples ranging from nuclear weapons to car oil changes, city leaders will try to sell the public on a multimillion-dollar repair plan for sidewalks, sewers and city buildings. Crumbling 80-year-old pipes under Main Street and inadequate storm drains are among the city's most serious infrastructure problems, Public Works Director Les Jones told the City Council this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
After a four-hour debate this week on how to deal with a $4-million operating budget deficit, the City Council declared that three programs will not be affected: drug education in schools, senior outreach services and Neighborhood Watch. "It's a strong message to the public that the council has taken a stand," Mayor Dave Sullivan said Tuesday. In recent weeks, the council has been deluged with pleas from supporters of the three programs not to eliminate them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
A new citywide sewer maintenance sewer fee and a hike in the business license fee will be the subject of a public hearing in September. City Council members set the hearing this week as they sought ways to raise money to offset a $4-million budget shortfall. But the levies might not have the support of the council itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
The need for hiring additional city staff was a question most City Council members asked as the council wrapped up its final workshop on a proposed two-year budget. City Councilman Tom Harman wondered why the police department requested four more parking control officers. Police Chief Ron Lowenberg said they are needed to enforce parking restrictions for twice-a-month street sweeping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
After sailing through a public hearing with just one call for better medians on Beach Boulevard, the City Council is set to adopt a $109-million operating budget next week. The budget--$213 million when capital funds such as water and sewer operations are added--is 1% higher than last year's and includes no new fees or taxes. At previous hearings on the city's spending, some residents urged the council to step up improvements to the water and sewer systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
City Administrator Ray Silver is proposing a $109-million operating budget for the 1998-99 fiscal year that is 1% larger than last year's and includes no new taxes or fees. Some residents made an emotional plea to the City Council on Monday to resurface potholed streets and repair downtown's aging sewer system. "It's time for a move back to the basics to take care of our streets, to take care of our sewers," said resident Sally Satterfield.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
A preliminary city budget for next year shows a deficit of $460,000, but officials say a proposed sewer fee could make up the shortfall and pay to repair broken and decaying waste-water lines. During a workshop Monday, City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga told the City Council he requested status-quo budgets from all city departments for 1997-98. But budget requests totaled about $101.6 million, up $4.5 million from this year's budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
Using examples ranging from nuclear weapons to car oil changes, city leaders will try to sell the public on a multimillion-dollar repair plan for sidewalks, sewers and city buildings. Crumbling 80-year-old pipes under Main Street and inadequate storm drains are among the city's most serious infrastructure problems, Public Works Director Les Jones told the City Council this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
The city faces the prospect of cutbacks in jobs, programs and services to offset a projected $3.7-million shortfall for the 1996-97 operating budget, department heads told the City Council this week. At a four-hour session Monday, 11 managers outlined service reductions that would be required if the city is to achieve cost reductions of $3 million to $5 million. City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga said one of the reasons that the city's general fund is short is that $6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
To deal with a projected general fund shortfall, City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga tonight will recommend spending reductions to the City Council and advise that the city should not fill vacant staff positions. The budget shortfall, estimated at $1.6 million, includes a potential $500,000 loss in interest earnings as a result of the Orange County bankruptcy. The council meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers, 2000 Main St.
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