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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1994 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Surf City Lifeguards Employee Assn., an organization representing about 80 seasonal lifeguards, will be recognized by the city, officials announced Friday. "In my opinion they meet all the guidelines to allow us to recognize them," William H. Osness, city personnel director, said. Richard J. Silber, a Huntington Beach attorney representing the part-time, seasonal lifeguards, called the city's recognition a landmark decision.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
The city is offering a group of its employees greater retirement benefits, and some worry that taxpayers may have to pick up the tab. About 600 city personnel are "very close" to concluding a labor agreement that would allow them to retire at 55 and still earn the same percentage of income they now have to wait until they're 60 to receive, said Bill Osness, the city's personnel director.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | MIMI KO
Tryouts will be held Sunday for those interested in becoming a city lifeguard. Tryouts will include a 1,000-yard and a 500-yard ocean swim and a 1,000-yard combination of running in the sand and swimming. About 100 applicants are expected for the events, which begin at 8 a.m. at the pier. The top 24 candidates passing the swimming and running tests will advance into the cadet training program, which will be conducted April 3 to 11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
City officials have yet to decide whether a park employee arrested last month for allegedly operating a drug lab out of his Lake Forest home should be fired, or even disciplined. Police raided the apartment of Brian Civitano, 37, on Aug. 12 and found evidence that he manufactured methamphetamine, authorities said. Officials arrested Civitano while confiscating chemical ingredients, equipment and a few grams of methamphetamine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former Huntington Beach police officer who was fired after department officials learned that he had hired prostitutes for sex sued Tuesday in an attempt to get his job back. Former officer Gary Gosper is suing the city, the department and the chief of police and asking the court to order the defendants to honor an arbitrator's Feb. 7 recommendation that he be rehired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
The city will spend an additional $500,000 to pay for retirement benefits after an unusual number of employees left their jobs last year. The City Council last week unanimously approved the expenditure. However, Councilman David Sullivan called the benefit costs an "outrage on the citizens of this community." During 1994, 67 employees retired, which is at least double the average number, Deputy City Administrator Robert Franz said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
City Atty. Gail Hutton may have gotten more than she bargained for when she asked the City Council to promote members of her staff. Hutton asked that two deputy attorneys be given supervisory positions. The council agreed but also approved an audit of her office. "If, indeed, the organization [of her office] is correct, an audit will confirm that," said Councilman Ralph H. Bauer, who suggested the audit, noting that the promotions may be masking managerial problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN and DEBRA CANO
The city is continuing to study how to cover a special retirement benefit for employees. All city retirees receive the benefit as part of their negotiated contracts, Deputy City Administrator Bob Franz said. The city pays a supplemental amount during the life of the retiree so that a spouse or other beneficiary can receive a portion of the retiree's pension after the worker's death. For the current fiscal year, the city will spend about $600,000 to pay for the benefit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
The City Council is expected to take action Tuesday involving city employees who plan to "spike" their retirement pensions by adding such benefits as unused vacation days and car allowances. The council's regular meeting will move from its usual Monday slot because of the Fourth of July holiday and be held Tuesday starting at 6:30 p.m. in the council chambers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
A committee of the Orange County Grand Jury has finished an investigation in the practice of city employees inflating retirement pensions and will complete its report in two weeks, officials said. "We have done our investigation and we're preparing our response, and at this point, we have no intention of any further investigation," said Seth Oberg, chairman of the grand jury's Administrative Agencies Committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1998 | JULIO V. CANO
The Police Department has announced a statewide recruitment effort as it tries to fill 15 vacancies left from retirements and departures in the past year. Most vacancies were caused by officers leaving for better-paying jobs, according to police union officials. Police officers have been working without a pay increase for five years; contract negotiations are at an impasse. The City Council recently called the situation a "crisis" and said a contract agreement is its priority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
The city has filed a lawsuit against the state agency that administers public employee retirement benefits, saying a mistake by the agency has left the city liable for $8 million in pensions. The suit, filed this week against the Public Employees Retirement System, asks that PERS, and not the city, be on the hook for the potential extra benefits to 104 city workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY
A retirement perk that city workers have enjoyed for a decade took an $800,000 bite from the budget this year, and Councilman Dave Sullivan said the workers should give it up for the good of the city. "With this million or so going out the door every year, it really makes it difficult," Sullivan said this week. But an official for one union said city workers gave up a pay raise when the perks started, and they won't give up benefits without something in exchange.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1995 | MIMI KO CRUZ
The part-time Police Department clerk position that has been the subject of debate over what types of employee benefits should be offered soon will become a full-time job. On a 4-3 vote, the City Council last week made the position full time, offering a $28,000 salary package including health insurance and retirement benefits. Carol Phelps has been doing the job as a temporary part-timer, without any benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1995 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN and DEBRA CANO
The city is continuing to study how to cover a special retirement benefit for employees. All city retirees receive the benefit as part of their negotiated contracts, Deputy City Administrator Bob Franz said. The city pays a supplemental amount during the life of the retiree so that a spouse or other beneficiary can receive a portion of the retiree's pension after the worker's death. For the current fiscal year, the city will spend about $600,000 to pay for the benefit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1994
The city's seasonal lifeguards, appropriately hooking into the Labor Day weekend theme, voted unanimously Saturday for union representation in their dealings with Huntington Beach. On one of the year's busiest beach weekends, 71 of the city's 103 summer lifeguards turned out at the Huntington Beach lifeguard headquarters to sign up with the newly formed Surf City Lifeguards Employee Assn.
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