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Huntington Beach Ca Government Employees Contracts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | BILL BILLITER
By a 5-2 vote, the City Council on Monday night passed a $96-million budget for the new fiscal year beginning July 1, but city officials said the spending plan could change, depending on the Legislature's actions this summer. Even though the city painfully managed to cover its own revenue shortfall of $4.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
For the first time in five years, Huntington Beach police are working with a contract. The City Council on Monday agreed to give about 200 officers, dispatchers and jailers a 10% raise over three years, said Police Lt. John Arnold. Members of the police union will receive a 4% raise retroactive to April, 3% in January 2000 and another 3% in April 2000. The contract will expire in October 2000. Both parties accepted an agreement brokered by state mediators and the council, Mayor Shirley S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council Tuesday voted to continue allowing employees to "spike" their retirement pensions, which already may have cost the city $13 million, saying they are bound by employee contracts. If they halted the practice of spiking now, the City Council "would be in violation of collective bargaining laws," Councilman David Sullivan said. "You can't unilaterally violate those agreements." The vote affects 153 employees who gave city officials notice before Friday of their intention to retire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
Councilman David Sullivan has sought to explain his vote earlier this month to permit some city employees to inflate pensions because their union contracts allow the practice. "I received a lot of phone calls indicating that people misunderstood my vote," said Sullivan, who said he fiercely opposes the practice called "spiking."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY and DEBRA CANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Huntington Beach City Council appears headed for a legal clash with the state over a recent city decision to allow employees to continue artificially inflating their retirement benefits, a practice expected to ultimately cost taxpayers $13 million. The council voted Tuesday not to restrict "spiking" of final-year salaries, which boosts pensions, despite a new state law that makes most aspects of that tactic illegal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1991 | BILL BILLITER
Scores of Huntington Beach police officers attended Tuesday night's City Council meeting to show support for their union's effort to get a new contract and pay raise. Monty Mauney, president of the 222-member Huntington Beach Police Officers Assn., said the union is asking for a one-year contract and a 10% pay raise. Mayor Peter M. Green said the city is offering a three-year contract, with a 4% pay raise the first year, 8% the second and another 8% the third year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
For the first time in five years, Huntington Beach police are working with a contract. The City Council on Monday agreed to give about 200 officers, dispatchers and jailers a 10% raise over three years, said Police Lt. John Arnold. Members of the police union will receive a 4% raise retroactive to April, 3% in January 2000 and another 3% in April 2000. The contract will expire in October 2000. Both parties accepted an agreement brokered by state mediators and the council, Mayor Shirley S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1994 | DEBRA CANO
Councilman David Sullivan has sought to explain his vote earlier this month to permit some city employees to inflate pensions because their union contracts allow the practice. "I received a lot of phone calls indicating that people misunderstood my vote," said Sullivan, who said he fiercely opposes the practice called "spiking."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY and DEBRA CANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Huntington Beach City Council appears headed for a legal clash with the state over a recent city decision to allow employees to continue artificially inflating their retirement benefits, a practice expected to ultimately cost taxpayers $13 million. The council voted Tuesday not to restrict "spiking" of final-year salaries, which boosts pensions, despite a new state law that makes most aspects of that tactic illegal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The City Council Tuesday voted to continue allowing employees to "spike" their retirement pensions, which already may have cost the city $13 million, saying they are bound by employee contracts. If they halted the practice of spiking now, the City Council "would be in violation of collective bargaining laws," Councilman David Sullivan said. "You can't unilaterally violate those agreements." The vote affects 153 employees who gave city officials notice before Friday of their intention to retire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | BILL BILLITER
By a 5-2 vote, the City Council on Monday night passed a $96-million budget for the new fiscal year beginning July 1, but city officials said the spending plan could change, depending on the Legislature's actions this summer. Even though the city painfully managed to cover its own revenue shortfall of $4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1991 | BILL BILLITER
Scores of Huntington Beach police officers attended Tuesday night's City Council meeting to show support for their union's effort to get a new contract and pay raise. Monty Mauney, president of the 222-member Huntington Beach Police Officers Assn., said the union is asking for a one-year contract and a 10% pay raise. Mayor Peter M. Green said the city is offering a three-year contract, with a 4% pay raise the first year, 8% the second and another 8% the third year.
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