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Huntington Beach Ca Government Officials Wages And Salaries

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NEWS
February 20, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill to stop the kind of public employee "pension-spiking" recently uncovered in Huntington Beach, Anaheim and six other Southern California cities easily passed its first committee Wednesday. The measure, sponsored by Assemblyman Dave Elder (D-San Pedro), would allow the state Public Employees' Retirement System (PERS) to recover excess retirement payments and impose a 25% penalty against a local official who improperly inflates his final year's salary for pension purposes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1994 | MARY LOU PICKEL
City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga will receive an 11% salary increase starting in February, the City Council decided Monday. The raise was approved by a 4-3 vote and will put Uberuaga's salary at $142,457. Councilman Ralph Bauer said Uberuaga has "done a fine job and I think he's saved us some money." But Councilman David Sullivan said he could not vote for the raise. "There are a lot of people who have done good jobs during this recession and they haven't gotten increases," he said.
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NEWS
January 8, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Using an Orange County case to underscore the point, state Controller Gray Davis said Tuesday that he wants to impose civil and criminal penalties against public officials who artificially inflate their salaries to receive large pensions.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill to stop the kind of public employee "pension-spiking" recently uncovered in Huntington Beach, Anaheim and six other Southern California cities easily passed its first committee Wednesday. The measure, sponsored by Assemblyman Dave Elder (D-San Pedro), would allow the state Public Employees' Retirement System (PERS) to recover excess retirement payments and impose a 25% penalty against a local official who improperly inflates his final year's salary for pension purposes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | BILL BILLITER
The City Council has tentatively agreed to give City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga an 8 1/2% pay raise plus a $10,000 bonus, Mayor Peter M. Green said Wednesday. The raise, not including the bonus, would bring Uberuaga's salary to about $128,000 a year. Green said the bonus was a contingency included in Uberuaga's contract when he was hired in February, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1994 | MARY LOU PICKEL
City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga will receive an 11% salary increase starting in February, the City Council decided Monday. The raise was approved by a 4-3 vote and will put Uberuaga's salary at $142,457. Councilman Ralph Bauer said Uberuaga has "done a fine job and I think he's saved us some money." But Councilman David Sullivan said he could not vote for the raise. "There are a lot of people who have done good jobs during this recession and they haven't gotten increases," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
City Councilman Earle Robitaille, in his first public meeting since state auditors accused him of improperly inflating his former salary to pad his pension payment, lashed out at critics. In a harshly worded attack, Robitaille, a former Huntington Beach police chief, called his critics "harebrained" and "witless" and repeated his contention of innocence. Meanwhile, Councilwoman Linda Moulton-Patterson on Tuesday asked City Administrator Michael T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
City Council members deadlocked this week on whether to cut their pay by 10% but decided to pick up the tab for their dinners before council meetings, something the city used to pay for. Both cost-cutting measures were hastily proposed by Councilman Don MacAllister near the end of Monday night's four-hour council meeting. MacAllister said he favored the ideas "to show our good faith" as the council works to make massive budget reductions during the months ahead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Reacting to state Controller Gray Davis' call to penalize public officials who artificially inflate their pay to get larger pensions, a citizens' group Wednesday called for an investigation of Davis' charges that retiring city employees had engaged in the practice here. At a news conference, Huntington Beach Tomorrow, which says it has 1,000 members, requested that the city undertake its own inquiry to curb the pension-inflating practice, which Davis has dubbed "salary spiking."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1991 | From Times Staff Writers
Three former Orange County city officials are among half a dozen such officials in the state who are drawing excessive pensions from the State Public Employees' Retirement System, according to an audit prepared by the state controller's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
City Councilman Earle Robitaille, in his first public meeting since state auditors accused him of improperly inflating his former salary to pad his pension payment, lashed out at critics. In a harshly worded attack, Robitaille, a former Huntington Beach police chief, called his critics "harebrained" and "witless" and repeated his contention of innocence. Meanwhile, Councilwoman Linda Moulton-Patterson on Tuesday asked City Administrator Michael T.
NEWS
January 11, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and JOHN PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State auditors on Friday released the names of 16 retired Huntington Beach officials--including Councilman Earle Robitaille--who the auditors say are collecting pensions based on artificially inflated salaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1992 | JOHN PENNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Reacting to state Controller Gray Davis' call to penalize public officials who artificially inflate their pay to get larger pensions, a citizens' group Wednesday called for an investigation of Davis' charges that retiring city employees had engaged in the practice here. At a news conference, Huntington Beach Tomorrow, which says it has 1,000 members, requested that the city undertake its own inquiry to curb the pension-inflating practice, which Davis has dubbed "salary spiking."
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Using an Orange County case to underscore the point, state Controller Gray Davis said Tuesday that he wants to impose civil and criminal penalties against public officials who artificially inflate their salaries to receive large pensions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
City Council members deadlocked this week on whether to cut their pay by 10% but decided to pick up the tab for their dinners before council meetings, something the city used to pay for. Both cost-cutting measures were hastily proposed by Councilman Don MacAllister near the end of Monday night's four-hour council meeting. MacAllister said he favored the ideas "to show our good faith" as the council works to make massive budget reductions during the months ahead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1991 | From Times Staff Writers
Three former Orange County city officials are among half a dozen such officials in the state who are drawing excessive pensions from the State Public Employees' Retirement System, according to an audit prepared by the state controller's office.
NEWS
January 11, 1992 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and JOHN PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State auditors on Friday released the names of 16 retired Huntington Beach officials--including Councilman Earle Robitaille--who the auditors say are collecting pensions based on artificially inflated salaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | BILL BILLITER
The City Council has tentatively agreed to give City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga an 8 1/2% pay raise plus a $10,000 bonus, Mayor Peter M. Green said Wednesday. The raise, not including the bonus, would bring Uberuaga's salary to about $128,000 a year. Green said the bonus was a contingency included in Uberuaga's contract when he was hired in February, 1990.
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