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Huntington Beach Ca Ordinances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1993 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So-called "graffiti art" has gotten the brushoff from the City Council, which heeded arguments from police who charge that the program led to an increase in illegal tagging. After a long and contentious meeting that didn't end until after midnight, the council voted 6-1 early Tuesday to end the city's controversial Sea Wall Art Program. That program, begun about a year and a half ago, allowed people to get free city permits to paint on seawalls near the beach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In response to several recent drownings of young children, Huntington Beach is weighing whether to become one of the first cities in the nation to require pool motion sensors that emit an alarm. Under a proposal being studied by the city, the alarms would be required on all new pools and whenever a property with an existing pool is sold. Most cities, including Huntington Beach, require fencing around new pools.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This city is facing something of a tree crisis. It started with a neighborhood dispute that turned up a little-known city law that says trees used as a hedge on the perimeters of a person's land must be no taller than six feet. That came as news to Councilman Don MacAllister, who, at Monday's City Council meeting, said he has "trees taller than that all around my property. If we enforced that ordinance strictly, we'd have to cut down trees all over the city."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers laboring 20 hours a day could get two mothballed AES generators running in time to meet the summer energy crunch, company officials testified Friday. There is only one problem: That violates Huntington Beach law, which restricts construction to 13 hours a day. If the law were followed, the extra energy wouldn't be available until autumn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1994 | BILL BILLITER
Have we got trouble? Right here in Ocean City? Well, it starts with "P," as in pool, but it doesn't rhyme with "T," as in trouble, city officials said. Pool and billiard halls are the subject of an ordinance that is scheduled to be introduced today, but City Administrator Michael T. Uberuaga said it's not that they're a problem. "We don't have any trouble," Uberuaga said. "It's just because the city needed a (legal) definition."
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major boost to critics who accuse Huntington Beach of overzealousness in cracking down on Fourth of July revelers, a judge has ruled that a city ordinance allowing police to arrest people for drinking alcohol on their front porches or lawns was unconstitutional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1992 | THUAN LE and IRIS YOKOI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The trouble began in the summer of 1986 on the sand at Newport Beach and Huntington Beach. First, nearly 160 people were arrested and several police officers were injured on July 4 in Newport in a rock- and bottle-throwing melee. The same thing happened at the end of August on Labor Day weekend in Huntington Beach, except people there also rushed a large lifeguard station and overturned and burned police cars. At least 40 people were injured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994
The city has passed an ordinance allowing tattoo businesses in certain commercial locations if they meet specific criteria. Michael Strange, senior planner, said that under the new ordinance, which will go into effect late next month, a tattoo business must meet three criteria: * Must not be within 200 feet of any lot zoned for residential use; * Must not be within 500 feet of any church or school and; * Must not be within 1,000 feet of any other adult business, such as a massage parlor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990 | BILL BILLITER
Drivers in this beach community soon will be without one excuse for overtime parking at a meter. A new city ordinance is scheduled for final passage tonight that would make it illegal to park in front of a broken parking meter. In the past, drivers could successfully appeal a parking ticket by notifying police that the meter was broken. Police, in turn, would notify the city's Community Services Department, which would investigate and verify that the meter was broken. Jim B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1991 | JOHN PENNER
The City Council this week stiffened regulations for street vendors, mainly targeting merchants in the Oak View neighborhood. The approved ordinance, the result of an accord between police officials and Oak View street vendors, limits merchants to selling between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. It also restricts vendors from parking their trucks, carts or wagons at one spot for more than 30 minutes at a time. After the 30 minutes are up, a vendor must move to a location at least 500 feet away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY
Huntington Beach officials took a stand Monday against a plan to double the size of a power plant in their community, fearing environmental concerns would be overlooked as the governor and Legislature rush to solve the state's energy crisis. Under a draft bill yet to be introduced in Sacramento, electric giant AES Corp. would be allowed to begin retrofitting two boilers before getting final approval from the California Energy Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2000 | Kenneth Ma, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
The City Council on Monday decided unanimously to table a final vote on an anti-nudity ordinance, citing a need to review information from a recent federal court ruling. In June, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of Alameda Books in its lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles. The court ruled that a city ordinance prohibiting adult book stores from having video viewing booths was unconstitutional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1999 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A portion of the shore at Huntington Beach will remain open to dogs for at least another year. That was the decision of the city's Community Services Commission on Wednesday after hearing testimony from people who opposed a plan to limit or deny dogs access to the popular pet spot. "We're delighted," said Martin Senak, president of the Preservation Society of Huntington Dog Beach, which helps maintain the city's dog-friendly stretch of sand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
In a move to curb the distribution of handbills that often end up as litter on driveways, parking lots and streets, the City Council has introduced an ordinance that would strictly regulate the practice. The ordinance, which the council will consider on Monday, would forbid anyone from placing a flyer or handbill on any vehicle.
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