Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHuntington Beach Playhouse
IN THE NEWS

Huntington Beach Playhouse

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven years in what was supposed to be a permanent home, the Huntington Beach Playhouse may be forced to move from the city's Central Library if a proposed rent increase of $100,000 a year is approved, theater officials said Tuesday. The City Council will ultimately decide on the rent increase--from $29,000 to $129,000--proposed by the library staff to offset city-ordered budget cuts. But one council member said the group will probably be unable to keep using the theater for the same rent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2001 | STANLEY ALLISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven years in what was supposed to be a permanent home, the Huntington Beach Playhouse may be forced to move from the city's Central Library if a proposed rent increase of $100,000 a year is approved, theater officials said Tuesday. The City Council will ultimately decide on the rent increase--from $29,000 to $129,000--proposed by the library staff to offset city-ordered budget cuts. But one council member said the group will probably be unable to keep using the theater for the same rent.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An aura of magic surrounds N. Richard Nash's 1954 comedy-drama "The Rainmaker." It has a kind of theatricality that--even with its sentimentality--used to be the bread and butter of Broadway. There's the oversized hero, the Rainmaker himself, that archetypal con man who has been popular for a century, from Dion Boucicault's "The Shaughraun" through George M. Cohan's Vagabond in "The Tavern," right up to "The Music Man." He is the lovable scamp who redeems himself in the end.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000 | Tariq Malik, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
The City Council delayed approving a new lease for the Huntington Beach Playhouse, a nonprofit theater group that operates out of the Central Library, until next month, citing a need for further study. During a Monday night meeting, playhouse officials urged council members to change the lease proposal and omit conditions that require a financial analysis of the group each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anthony Shaffer's "Sleuth," one of those sturdy murder mysteries to which community theaters often turn, starts off amiably enough. Andrew Wyke, pompous whodunit novelist, and Milo Tindle, the young guy who's been sleeping with Andrew's wife, meet to talk things over. It doesn't take long for Andrew to reveal a nasty streak. Seems his civilized veneer is just window-dressing--he's really out for revenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1995 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Huntington Beach Playhouse has long been known as strictly a community theater--maybe better than some, but still devoted to the common denominator when choosing its shows. That may be changing. Playhouse administrators say they will continue to appeal to patrons more accustomed to the mainstream than Mamet, but they also want to open up and take a few chances. They point to their new Black Box productions as a telling sign.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The 10th wedding-anniversary party of New York Deputy Mayor Charlie Brock and his wife, Myra, is a disaster. As the guests arrive at the Brocks' tasty Sneden's Landing home, there are no servants, Myra has vanished, and Charlie is upstairs, overdosed on Valium and with a bullet hole through his earlobe. Neil Simon sidestepped from sitcom to farce for this one, and in the right hands his "Rumors" can be very funny.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"On Golden Pond" can seem like a visit to the emotions boutique, where all the feelings are persuasively packaged and displayed. Look, there's sadness over there, right next to regret. Isn't that joy in the corner, just a few feet from love? However well-intentioned (and it is very well-intentioned), Ernest Thompson's sentimental play never has relied on understatement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The irrepressible teenage boys who inhabit Jim Jacobs' and Warren Casey's 1972 smash Broadway hit "Grease," which takes place in the 1950s, are mostly concerned with getting a car, a girl and a diploma, in that order. They are a fiction, no less stereotypical than the kids on "Happy Days." But that's part of the fun, particularly in the Huntington Beach Playhouse's sprightly revival. The play doesn't bother us with the honest truth, nor with much with a plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a trick to making any production of Meredith Willson's "The Music Man" work like gangbusters, and it's the one important detail that's overlooked in an otherwise top-notch staging at the Huntington Beach Playhouse. Willson's story (created with Franklin Lacey) is set in 1912. That was the approximate period of popular tales about "Get-Rich-Quick Wallingford," and "Peck's Bad Boy," both reluctant heroes whose misdeeds were monumental, but who were redeemed at the finish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2000 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The biggest thing in Lala Levy's life at the moment is getting invited by an available young man to "The Last Night of Ballyhoo." It isn't that easy. She's paranoid about having dropped out of college and about practically everything else in her life. And her control-freak mother, Boo Levy, doesn't make anything easier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People aren't born in Huntington Central Park, and they can't be buried there. But the 100-plus-acre eastern end of the park in Huntington Beach offers something to address nearly every human need that falls in between. There is a restaurant to please the palate and fill the stomach. A public library housing 300,000 volumes and subscriptions to 650 periodicals beckons the intellect, the imagination and even the spirit (three local churches rent meeting rooms for Sunday services).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Neil Simon's plays may look simple to pull off, but a lot of people are flimflammed by them. They require as much technical care and style as Sheridan, Wilde or Coward. The current revival of "Laughter on the 23rd Floor" at Huntington Beach Playhouse is a perfect example of how just a couple of missteps can throw Simon out of joint. "Laughter" fills in a gap in the playwright's autobiographical later works.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1999
Art * "Portfolios," paintings, photography, mixed media, sculpture and video installations by five emerging Southern California artists, including Nicole Cohen, Alvin Gregorio, Spanda Moradmand, Paco Shima and Mark Tsang, opens at the Saddleback College Art Gallery, 28000 Marguerite Parkway, Mission Viejo. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. today. Free. Through Oct. 14. (949) 582-4924.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The irrepressible teenage boys who inhabit Jim Jacobs' and Warren Casey's 1972 smash Broadway hit "Grease," which takes place in the 1950s, are mostly concerned with getting a car, a girl and a diploma, in that order. They are a fiction, no less stereotypical than the kids on "Happy Days." But that's part of the fun, particularly in the Huntington Beach Playhouse's sprightly revival. The play doesn't bother us with the honest truth, nor with much with a plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For many years following its hit bow on Broadway in 1941, Joseph Kesselring's "Arsenic and Old Lace" was a staple of summer stock community theaters. You don't see much of it lately, so for the most part, it is a delight to see it on the stage again at Huntington Beach Playhouse. The play is almost foolproof. The loony plot is simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Adler and Jerry Ross' 1955 "Damn Yankees" followed quickly on the heels of their first hit, "Pajama Game." The score isn't nearly as inventive, and the book by George Abbott and Douglas Wallop, though based on the Faust legend, seems rather ordinary today. Middle-aged Joe Boyd lives half the year for baseball. When the devil, in the person of Mr. Applegate, offers Joe diamond glory in return for his soul, Joe jumps at the chance. Bingo.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Judging by the number of upcoming productions of Michael Frayn's frantic farce "Noises Off," it is rapidly becoming a staple in theaters large and small. And no wonder. It's very funny. The play details the harrowing, and often hilarious, adventures of a third-rate British theater company touring in a farce-within-the-farce called "Nothing On," by the fictitious Robin Housemonger. Act I takes place on the set during the disastrous dress rehearsal before the tour begins.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1999 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An aura of magic surrounds N. Richard Nash's 1954 comedy-drama "The Rainmaker." It has a kind of theatricality that--even with its sentimentality--used to be the bread and butter of Broadway. There's the oversized hero, the Rainmaker himself, that archetypal con man who has been popular for a century, from Dion Boucicault's "The Shaughraun" through George M. Cohan's Vagabond in "The Tavern," right up to "The Music Man." He is the lovable scamp who redeems himself in the end.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|