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Huntington Beach Surfing Walk Of Fame

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Surfing used to be illegal in Surf City. "Back in 1956, they didn't want surfing in this town. Man, that was a bad element," said Gordie Duane, who got the first citation for surfing then. But the passage of 40 years has turned Duane from criminal to local hero, and on Friday, he was one of six surfing pioneers inducted into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. "They call it local hero. I think it's more like local rebel," Duane, 67, said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1997 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Surfing used to be illegal in Surf City. "Back in 1956, they didn't want surfing in this town. Man, that was a bad element," said Gordie Duane, who got the first citation for surfing then. But the passage of 40 years has turned Duane from criminal to local hero, and on Friday, he was one of six surfing pioneers inducted into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. "They call it local hero. I think it's more like local rebel," Duane, 67, said.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 1994 | Greg Johnson / Times staff writer
Surfing Walk of Fame: On Aug. 4, as part of the U.S. Open of Surfing, the International Surfing Museum will induct its first members into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. The 10 a.m. ceremony will include five inductees, including the posthumous induction of surfing great Duke Kahanamoku. Honorees will have their namesinscribed in granite stones that are being placed in the sidewalk at Pacific Coast Highway and Main Street in downtown Huntington Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2000 | Kenneth Ma, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
Nine new members have been inducted to the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame. A crowd of 150 gathered at Pacific Coast Highway and Main Street last week for a ceremony honoring people who have made significant achievements in the surfing community. This year's inductees are Mark Occhilupo, Bud Llamas, Greg MacGillivray, the late Jim Freeman, the late Nancy Katin, Gerry Lopez, Eddie Aikau, Mike Abdelmuti and George Farquhar.
SPORTS
July 5, 1998
Kelly Flathers won the women's open division of the Huntington Beach Parade 5K race for the second consecutive year Saturday. Flathers of Huntington Beach, won in 17 minutes 8 seconds. Flathers, 27, won last year in 17:21. Trini Robles, 35, of Placentia was second in 17:34 and Erin Remy, 32, of Fullerton was third in 18:13. Remy ran cross-country and track at Orange Coast and Cal State Fullerton. Oliver Wild of Irvine won the men's open 5K in 15:13.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | DAVID REYES
The 1995 U.S. Open of Surfing, Aug. 1-6, caps a two-week surfing festival at the Huntington Beach Pier, which transforms into Surf Central beginning Monday, when the 14th annual Op Pro Surfing Championship starts. Last year, more than 300,000 people visited the festival, which besides the world's top surfers includes a beach expo that takes up three acres and features surfboard shapers, music, free T-shirts and dozens of booths hawking the latest in beach fashion trends.
SPORTS
July 28, 2003 | John Weyler
Y -- the inventor of the boogie board, formerly known as Tom Morey -- will be inducted into the Huntington Beach Surfing Walk of Fame on Thursday. The boogie board is among the world's most popular wave-riding vehicles, but Y isn't a millionaire and doesn't want to be. He left his job as a consultant at Wham-O Corp. -- which owns the Morey name -- and works out of his garage in Capistrano Beach, inventing surfboard shapes and composites and even wave machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1998 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jack O'Neill began riding the waves about 50 years ago, surfers would cover themselves in petroleum jelly and tape wool sweaters to their bodies to try to stay warm. But thanks to O'Neill's workshop experiments, which resulted in the first functional surfing wetsuit in 1952, the sport became accessible year-round and surfers could abandon their soggy sweaters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2004 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Before Jan and Dean sang about going to Surf City, wave riders such as Jack Haley, L.J. Richards and Linda Benson came to Huntington Beach every summer to compete. Forty-five years later, the surf contest next to the city's pier has become a major event on the professional surfing tour, complete with corporate sponsors, scores of vendors, television coverage and an elaborate beachfront concert stage. More than 300,000 people are expected to attend the Honda U.S.
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