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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Frank B. Gibney, a journalist, editor and businessman who played an influential role in post-World War II America as an interpreter of Japan and its culture, died April 9 of heart failure at his Santa Barbara home. He was 81. Gibney was a member of the Navy's elite corps of Japanese translators, interpreters and code breakers who were vital to efforts to end World War II.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1985 | TED VOLLMER and BARBARA ISENBERG, Times Staff Writers
In a blow to backers of an ambitious expansion of the Music Center, a private consultant has recommended a scaled-down version, saying that existing entertainment facilities elsewhere render two proposed theaters in the multifaceted plan "impossible to justify at this time." But well-known consultant Harrison Price said that the Music Center "clearly needs a new large performance hall if the programs of the existing resident companies are to continue to grow and thrive."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2002 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Vinnette Carroll, Broadway's first black woman director, died Tuesday in Lauderhill, Fla. Carroll, who brought African American-oriented musical theater to a wider public in the 1970s, had suffered a stroke last year and had symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, though the exact cause of death was not announced. She was 80.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean-Pierre Aumont, the suave, debonair actor whose seven-decade career on American and continental stage, screen and television ranged from "Lili" with Leslie Caron to Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" to the 1998 television miniseries "The Count of Monte Cristo," has died. He was 90. Aumont died Tuesday in his home in Saint-Tropez on the French Riviera.
NEWS
April 5, 1993 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eugenie Leontovich, stage and film actress, writer, director and acting teacher, has died in New York City at 93. Noted for her Broadway roles in "Grand Hotel" and "Anastasia," Miss Leontovich died Friday at a nursing home in Manhattan of cardiac arrest and pneumonia. Her best-known film role was probably that of the Maharani in "The Rains of Ranchipur" with Richard Burton and Lana Turner in 1955.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1985 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer and
The American Cinematheque and UCLA Film Archives' introductory week of "50 Years of Film From the Museum of Modern Art" tonight at 8 will present at the Doolittle (formerly Huntington Hartford) two of the 12 one-hour documentaries Joris Ivens made in China in 1972-73 as the Cultural Revolution was coming to its conclusion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
James Crosby, who parlayed a small paint company into the major gaming corporation that launched gambling in Atlantic City nearly eight years ago, has died at age 58. Crosby, board chairman of Resorts International, died Thursday at New York University Hospital in New York City after respiratory surgery. He had suffered from chronic emphysema for many years. On May 26, 1978, Resorts International opened the city's first gaming hall, at the time the only legal American casino outside Nevada.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
No one writes drawing room comedies anymore. They don't even build drawing rooms anymore. And they were hard to find even in 1958, when playwrights Cornelia Otis Skinner and Sam Taylor unveiled "The Pleasure of His Company," a work Noel Coward said he wished he had written himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1986 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
High costs may be forcing the Music Center's Center Theatre Group and Gordon Davidson, artistic director of the CTG's Mark Taper Forum, to withdraw from their participation in the booking and management of the James A. Doolittle Theatre (formerly the Huntington Hartford). Unconfirmed reports indicate that unless a new arrangement can be struck or new sources of revenue found, Davidson and the CTG may have to pull out of the Doolittle operation in Hollywood after less than a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2003 | Leslee Komaiko, Special to The Times
After the opening-night performance of Lily Tomlin's "The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe" at the Ahmanson Theatre May 21, about 300 anointed audience members -- mostly FOLs (friends of Lily), FOFOLs (friends of friends of Lily) and Center Theatre Group bigwigs -- strolled across the plaza to the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion for an after-party and Lily love fest in the dramatic second-floor Grand Hall.
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