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Huntington S Disease

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NEWS
March 24, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carrie Statkus, a 24-year-old Brea homemaker, worries about herself, but even more about the future of her 6-month-old daughter. It was shortly before her daughter's birth that Statkus learned that her own father's mood swings foreshadowed the onset of Huntington's disease. She also learned that her estranged paternal grandfather was in a nursing home dying of the same disease, which is passed from parent to child, attacks the brain and robs a person of muscle control and dignity.
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NEWS
February 17, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A study published Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine described a group of people in Ecuador, descended from Spanish Jews who fled the Inquisition and converted to Christianity, who lack genes that help process human growth hormone in the body. The mutation they share results in very short stature -- they grow to only about 3 or 4 feet tall -- and high infant mortality. But their bodies' inability to receive growth hormone also seems to protect this group from diabetes and cancer, the researchers reported -- adding that this suggested that for aging people with normal levels of hormonal activity, less and not more human growth hormone may be best.
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NEWS
March 24, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
After the longest and most frustrating search in the annals of molecular biology, an international team of researchers has located the defective gene that causes Huntington's disease, a crippling disorder that afflicts about 30,000 Americans. The discovery will immediately make possible cheaper and more accurate tests to identify people who will develop Huntington's.
NATIONAL
August 24, 2002 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite community pleas for mercy, a Georgia grand jury handed up murder charges Friday against a woman who fatally shot two adult sons as they lay in a nursing home in advanced stages of Huntington's disease. Carol Carr, 63, faces the possibility of life in prison if she is convicted of the killings, which friends insist she carried out in a desperate bid to end her sons' suffering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marianne Whitmyer first noticed the changes in her fingers and her tongue. They looked the same but no longer worked the same, her fine motor control dissolving after two decades as a professional flutist. The problem, doctors discovered early last year, is that Whitmyer's brain is dying. Whitmyer, principal flute and soloist with the Irvine Symphony, suffers from Huntington's chorea, or Huntington's disease, a progressive hereditary illness that leads to death.
NEWS
February 17, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A study published Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine described a group of people in Ecuador, descended from Spanish Jews who fled the Inquisition and converted to Christianity, who lack genes that help process human growth hormone in the body. The mutation they share results in very short stature -- they grow to only about 3 or 4 feet tall -- and high infant mortality. But their bodies' inability to receive growth hormone also seems to protect this group from diabetes and cancer, the researchers reported -- adding that this suggested that for aging people with normal levels of hormonal activity, less and not more human growth hormone may be best.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | MALCOLM RITTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A surprising and provocative study of brain tissue from people with Huntington's disease offers clues on how a defective gene causes the disorder and how it might be treated. About 30,000 Americans have HD, which generally appears between ages 30 and 45. It slowly hampers a person's ability to walk, think, talk and reason. Eventually, an affected person becomes totally dependent on others, and death usually follows from complications of the condition.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Four years after the discovery of the defective gene that causes Huntington's disease, researchers have produced the first clues about how the gene causes the devastating disorder. That new insight, experts say, could quickly lead to the first successful treatments not only for Huntington's, but also for half a dozen other diseases that have an identical genetic defect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993
A UC Irvine biological chemistry professor is a member of an international research team that on Wednesday won the National Medical Research Award. Prof. John Wasmuth will share the prestigious award with six other scientists. The seven make up the Huntington's Disease Collaborative Research Group. The group was honored for discovering the gene responsible for Huntington's disease. The award was presented by the National Health Council.
NEWS
May 21, 1989 | LARRY THOMPSON, The Washington Post
Ever since it became clear that the United States would launch a massive project to identify every one of the estimated 100,000 genes in the human body, scientists from laboratories throughout the country and around the world have vied to get in on the ground floor. Even though a formal plan for the $3-billion project will not be assembled until later this summer, two recent meetings--one here at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and a conference in Washington--quickly demonstrated that scientists have already begun several key experiments.
OPINION
June 27, 2002
It seems hard to believe that a mother would kill two of her own children (" 'Motherly Love' Cited in Sons' Deaths," June 20). However, if you have gone through the terrible, agonizing years of Huntington's disease you would have an insight into what went on in Carol Carr's mind. My wife has the disease. She cannot speak, she drools, she falls--it goes on and on. Her problems started in the mid-1980s. It is usually a very slow process. My wife may live for another 10 years, and she is only going to deteriorate more.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | MALCOLM RITTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A surprising and provocative study of brain tissue from people with Huntington's disease offers clues on how a defective gene causes the disorder and how it might be treated. About 30,000 Americans have HD, which generally appears between ages 30 and 45. It slowly hampers a person's ability to walk, think, talk and reason. Eventually, an affected person becomes totally dependent on others, and death usually follows from complications of the condition.
NEWS
November 30, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
French researchers have successfully reversed the course of Huntington's disease in three of five patients by implanting fetal brain cells into their brains. Several research teams have previously attempted the feat, but the French results are the best to date, experts said. "This is a very promising preliminary result, even though it is a small number of patients," said Dr.
HEALTH
October 9, 2000 | ROBERT COOKE, NEWSDAY
In the long, difficult struggle to understand--and do something about--the brain ailment called Huntington's disease, scientists have decided the best approach may be to go fishing. The target is a strange jellyfish that has a natural ability to glow in the dark when pestered, showing its irritation in eerie green light. The glow, they hope, will lead toward a cure for Huntington's disease, a fatal brain disorder first noted among people living on the eastern tip of Long Island, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1999
Studies in mice may lead to a new treatment for Huntington's disease, Harvard researchers report in today's issue of the journal Nature. The disease is known to be caused by a defect in the gene that is the blueprint for a protein called huntingtin, but scientists are not sure how the defect produces the disease. Mice with the defective gene develop Huntington's symptoms. Dr. Robert M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1998 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marianne Whitmyer first noticed the changes in her fingers and her tongue. They looked the same but no longer worked the same, her fine motor control dissolving after two decades as a professional flutist. The problem, doctors discovered early last year, is that Whitmyer's brain is dying. Whitmyer, principal flute and soloist with the Irvine Symphony, suffers from Huntington's chorea, or Huntington's disease, a progressive hereditary illness that leads to death.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
The first test capable of predicting whether a person will develop an incurable disease in mid-life has been offered to children of Huntington's disease patients, providing a poignant look at the human consequences of the emerging technology of genetic screening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1988 | Compiled by staff and wire reports
The discovery of a new genetic marker "very closely linked" to Huntington's disease should improve the reliability of tests to predict the inherited, degenerative disorder, researchers said last week. Although the Huntington's gene, itself, has yet to be isolated, a study published in the British journal Nature reports the discovery of a marker that lies so close to the disease gene that the two are almost always inherited together. "It is very closely linked to the disease gene.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Four years after the discovery of the defective gene that causes Huntington's disease, researchers have produced the first clues about how the gene causes the devastating disorder. That new insight, experts say, could quickly lead to the first successful treatments not only for Huntington's, but also for half a dozen other diseases that have an identical genetic defect.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Following up on the discovery two years ago of the gene that causes Huntington's disease, researchers have identified a key protein involved in the progression of the disorder--a discovery that opens the possibility of the first effective treatment for the hitherto mystifying disease. Shortly after the Huntington's gene was identified, researchers found the protein it produces, an unusually large molecule they called huntingtin that was unlike any protein previously identified.
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