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Hurley Steve

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NEWS
July 17, 2003 | Kevin Bronson, Times Staff Writer
Gigolo AUNTS guitarist Dave Gibbs' steely blues eyes glisten playfully when he is asked about his latest project. "It's a sea chantey," he says, pausing a beat for disbelief to kick in. "It's for the movie 'Peter Pan.' Yes, it's miles away from anything I thought I'd ever do, and I don't even know if it'll make the movie or get cut out. But it's a darn good pirate song. And I'd rather write music than wait tables."
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BUSINESS
April 28, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
YouTube founders Chad Hurley and Steve Chen have bought the popular social bookmarking service Delicious from Yahoo Inc. Yahoo, trying to mount a comeback under Chief Executive Carol Bartz, unloaded Delicious as part of its plan to shed underperforming business units. It did not disclose terms of the deal. Delicious will become part of a new venture that Hurley and Chen have launched called AVOS. Hurley and Chen have based Delicious in San Mateo, Calif., blocks away from where they started YouTube.
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BUSINESS
April 28, 2011 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
YouTube founders Chad Hurley and Steve Chen have bought the popular social bookmarking service Delicious from Yahoo Inc. Yahoo, trying to mount a comeback under Chief Executive Carol Bartz, unloaded Delicious as part of its plan to shed underperforming business units. It did not disclose terms of the deal. Delicious will become part of a new venture that Hurley and Chen have launched called AVOS. Hurley and Chen have based Delicious in San Mateo, Calif., blocks away from where they started YouTube.
NEWS
July 17, 2003 | Kevin Bronson, Times Staff Writer
Gigolo AUNTS guitarist Dave Gibbs' steely blues eyes glisten playfully when he is asked about his latest project. "It's a sea chantey," he says, pausing a beat for disbelief to kick in. "It's for the movie 'Peter Pan.' Yes, it's miles away from anything I thought I'd ever do, and I don't even know if it'll make the movie or get cut out. But it's a darn good pirate song. And I'd rather write music than wait tables."
BUSINESS
November 15, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Google Inc. is holding back more than $200 million of the stock it paid to acquire YouTube Inc. to cover losses or possible legal bills for the frequent copyright violations on YouTube's video-sharing site. Google said it was withholding for one year 12.5% of the stock owed to YouTube's former owners "to secure certain indemnification obligations." The Mountain View, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Jenny Sundel
TAKE a number, George! 4. Marion Cotillard momentarily leaves George Clooney -- yes, Clooney! -- hanging at the 80th Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Feb. 4 to reach out to Javier Bardem. Could the lady get any luckier? Well, yes. That night, the "La Vie en Rose" star got some ice from Chopard, which hosted a tres chic soiree for the French actress at the Chateau Marmont. The theme? Red roses, of course, which filled the scarlet-lighted bungalow. Clad in a strapless Chloe stunner, la belle of the ball sipped Champagne and bonded with fellow nominees Julian Schnabel and Amy Ryan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011
Oscar-winning actor Morgan Freeman will receive the Hollywood Foreign Press Assn.'s 2012 Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 69th Golden Globe Awards, the group announced Wednesday. The ceremony will take place Jan. 15. The Cecil B. DeMille Award is given, according to the HFPA, to "talented individuals who have made an incredible impact on the world of entertainment. " Freeman, 74, joins such past recipients as Robert De Niro, Martin Scorsese and Steven Spielberg. Freeman earned a supporting actor Oscar for 2004's "Million Dollar Baby," directed by Clint Eastwood, and he received a lead actor Oscar nomination for Eastwood's 2009 film "Invictus," in which he played South African leader Nelson Mandela.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Saturday evening was a busy one for writer-director Joel Coen. The iconoclastic filmmaker arrived around 8 p.m. at USC's Doheny Library to pick up the 20th anniversary USC Libraries Scripter Award for "No Country for Old Men." The award honors both the author and screenwriter of the year's best book-to-film adaptation. Novelist Cormac McCarthy's award was accepted by actress Christine Lahti, and Coen accepted for both himself and his younger brother Ethan, who was stuck at an airport.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2007 | Dawn C. Chmielewski, Meg James and Thomas S. Mulligan, Times Staff Writers
With a $1-billion lawsuit, Viacom Inc. is aiming to upend Google Inc.'s plan to change the way people watch TV and movies. Viacom, which owns MTV Networks and Paramount Pictures, sued Google in federal court Tuesday, accusing the Internet company of "brazenly exploiting" the power of the Web to make easy money off Hollywood's hard work.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2010 | By Alex Pham, Los Angeles Times
On a blustery spring day five years ago, Yakov Lapitzy pointed a video camera at his friend Jawed Karim standing in front of two elephants at the San Diego Zoo and hit the record button. The resulting 19-second clip, titled "Me at the zoo," was not a cinematic masterpiece, with Karim remarking on the pachyderm's "really, really long trunks." But as the first video uploaded to YouTube, it played a pivotal role in fundamentally altering how people consumed media and helped usher in a golden era of the 60-second video.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2006 | Chris Gaither and Dawn C. Chmielewski, Times Staff Writers
Google Inc. appeared Friday to be the latest suitor vying for the affections of YouTube Inc., a match-up that would unite the search giant's technical and advertising might with the online video pioneer's rapidly growing audience. Since it debuted last year, YouTube has been a new-media darling, fielding proposals from Viacom Inc. and News Corp.
OPINION
October 28, 2006 | Randall Rothenberg, RANDALL ROTHENBERG is the senior director of intellectual capital at the global management consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton and the author of "Where the Suckers Moon: The Life and Death of an Advertising Campaign."
NOT TO RAIN ON Silicon Valley's parade, but Google's $1.7-billion acquisition of YouTube isn't really about the future of advertising, the death of TV or new info-oligopolies. It's about the triumph of radical left-wing politics -- which means it's just as likely to subvert business as to support its reinvention. The YouTube phenomenon boils down to this: The cost of creating and distributing information is trending toward zero.
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