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Hurricanes Eastern United States

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BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Insurers Rate Hurricane Damage: Hurricane Bob caused $780 million in damage to insured property along the East Coast, making it the second-most-expensive hurricane in U.S. history, according to insurance industry figures. The estimate came a week after the hurricane hit New England, damaging buildings, boats and farmland and knocking out power to more than 2 million customers. The damage total ranks Bob behind Hurricane Hugo, but it is a distant second. Hugo caused $4.
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NEWS
September 2, 1993 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hurricane Emily headed into the Atlantic to die Wednesday, and the residents of North Carolina's Outer Banks emerged from their homes to take inventory--and in most cases to consider themselves among the fortunate. The storm, packing winds of more than 115 m.p.h., left pockets of extensive damage from Avon to Hatteras, but did not kill or seriously injure anyone on the Outer Banks, which only Monday morning had been packed with some 20,000 residents and more than 100,000 tourists.
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NEWS
September 1, 1993 | DAVID LAMB and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The wild winds of Hurricane Emily, gusting at more than 130 m.p.h., slapped at the Outer Banks islands Tuesday, then veered north along the Eastern Seaboard, sparing most of North Carolina but terrorizing tourists and residents from Virginia to Long Island. Fifteen-foot waves slammed the pier at this tiny town on the Outer Banks as the hurricane conspired with an 8 p.m. EDT high tide, tugged even higher by a full moon. Trees crashed across roads, and rain swamped cars. The wind peaked at 132 m.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | DAVID LAMB and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The wild winds of Hurricane Emily, gusting at more than 130 m.p.h., slapped at the Outer Banks islands Tuesday, then veered north along the Eastern Seaboard, sparing most of North Carolina but terrorizing tourists and residents from Virginia to Long Island. Fifteen-foot waves slammed the pier at this tiny town on the Outer Banks as the hurricane conspired with an 8 p.m. EDT high tide, tugged even higher by a full moon. Trees crashed across roads, and rain swamped cars. The wind peaked at 132 m.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hurricane Bob slammed into New England Monday, downing trees and power lines, smashing boats, ripping off porches and balconies and popping out windows as it battered the coastline with high winds and torrential rains. The storm, the second of the hurricane season, was blamed for at least three deaths and 20 injuries as it moved up the Eastern Seaboard. At least three persons also were reported missing, one of whom was believed to have been swept off a yacht into the raging Atlantic Ocean.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | MIKE CLARY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The early winds of Hurricane Emily keened across the North Carolina coast Monday night like a hungry cry, and authorities ordered 150,000 people to flee the shoreline and abandon a string of fragile barrier islands. Businesses closed. Schools canceled classes. Fishermen moved their boats to safer harbor. Lumberyards sold out of plywood for boarding up windows. Residents who stayed to face the storm, which could hit as early as noon EDT today, did last-minute stocking up: food, water, batteries.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hurricane Bob caused $780 million in damage to insured property along the East Coast and was the second most expensive hurricane in U.S. history, according to claim figures released in Boston by the American Insurance Services Group Inc., a trade group. The totals placed Bob's destructive force second only to Hurricane Hugo's 1989 assault. The largest losses from the storm occurred in Massachusetts, where claims totaled $525 million.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hurricane Emily headed into the Atlantic to die Wednesday, and the residents of North Carolina's Outer Banks emerged from their homes to take inventory--and in most cases to consider themselves among the fortunate. The storm, packing winds of more than 115 m.p.h., left pockets of extensive damage from Avon to Hatteras, but did not kill or seriously injure anyone on the Outer Banks, which only Monday morning had been packed with some 20,000 residents and more than 100,000 tourists.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two men and a pregnant woman who lost their sailboat to Hurricane Bob said they drifted in a life raft for 10 days, surviving on dried fish and sea water as sharks circled nearby. A Coast Guard helicopter spotted their orange raft Wednesday about 80 miles off Cape May, N.J. All three were flown to an aircraft carrier, where a doctor treated them for dehydration and exposure. The health of the fetus was not immediately known. The three--Marc Dupauillion, 26, of Calabash, N.C.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Cleanup and repairs got under way Tuesday in the wake of Hurricane Bob, which knocked out power to 2.1 million customers and left at least 16 people dead between the Carolinas and eastern Canada. "I didn't think we'd get hit this badly," said George Merrell, owner of Westfield Orchard in Plainfield, Conn., who estimated that he lost several thousand bushels of apples, worth about $8 a bushel. Officials said Hurricane Bob did not appear to wreak as much damage as Hurricane Gloria in 1985.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | MIKE CLARY and JAMES GERSTENZANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The early winds of Hurricane Emily keened across the North Carolina coast Monday night like a hungry cry, and authorities ordered 150,000 people to flee the shoreline and abandon a string of fragile barrier islands. Businesses closed. Schools canceled classes. Fishermen moved their boats to safer harbor. Lumberyards sold out of plywood for boarding up windows. Residents who stayed to face the storm, which could hit as early as noon EDT today, did last-minute stocking up: food, water, batteries.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | From Associated Press
An intense, slow-moving Atlantic storm hurled hurricane-force winds and towering waves at the East Coast on Wednesday, collapsing homes on Long Island and causing flooding, beach erosion and power outages from the Carolinas to Maine. More than 30 people were rescued at sea, and at least three more were missing. "Hurricane Bob was a squall compared to this," said Jerry Congdon, a police officer in Wells, Me.
NEWS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two men and a pregnant woman who lost their sailboat to Hurricane Bob said they drifted in a life raft for 10 days, surviving on dried fish and sea water as sharks circled nearby. A Coast Guard helicopter spotted their orange raft Wednesday about 80 miles off Cape May, N.J. All three were flown to an aircraft carrier, where a doctor treated them for dehydration and exposure. The health of the fetus was not immediately known. The three--Marc Dupauillion, 26, of Calabash, N.C.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Insurers Rate Hurricane Damage: Hurricane Bob caused $780 million in damage to insured property along the East Coast, making it the second-most-expensive hurricane in U.S. history, according to insurance industry figures. The estimate came a week after the hurricane hit New England, damaging buildings, boats and farmland and knocking out power to more than 2 million customers. The damage total ranks Bob behind Hurricane Hugo, but it is a distant second. Hugo caused $4.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hurricane Bob caused $780 million in damage to insured property along the East Coast and was the second most expensive hurricane in U.S. history, according to claim figures released in Boston by the American Insurance Services Group Inc., a trade group. The totals placed Bob's destructive force second only to Hurricane Hugo's 1989 assault. The largest losses from the storm occurred in Massachusetts, where claims totaled $525 million.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Cleanup and repairs got under way Tuesday in the wake of Hurricane Bob, which knocked out power to 2.1 million customers and left at least 16 people dead between the Carolinas and eastern Canada. "I didn't think we'd get hit this badly," said George Merrell, owner of Westfield Orchard in Plainfield, Conn., who estimated that he lost several thousand bushels of apples, worth about $8 a bushel. Officials said Hurricane Bob did not appear to wreak as much damage as Hurricane Gloria in 1985.
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | From Associated Press
An intense, slow-moving Atlantic storm hurled hurricane-force winds and towering waves at the East Coast on Wednesday, collapsing homes on Long Island and causing flooding, beach erosion and power outages from the Carolinas to Maine. More than 30 people were rescued at sea, and at least three more were missing. "Hurricane Bob was a squall compared to this," said Jerry Congdon, a police officer in Wells, Me.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | ANNE C. ROARK and DAVID TREADWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hurricane Bob slammed into New England Monday, downing trees and power lines, smashing boats, ripping off porches and balconies and popping out windows as it battered the coastline with high winds and torrential rains. The storm, the second of the hurricane season, was blamed for at least three deaths and 20 injuries as it moved up the Eastern Seaboard. At least three persons also were reported missing, one of whom was believed to have been swept off a yacht into the raging Atlantic Ocean.
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