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Hurricanes South Carolina

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NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although they are a continent apart, the cities of Charleston, S.C., and San Francisco now share a fateful page in the ledger of time. They are the scenes of two of the century's costliest, back-to-back natural disasters: Hurricane Hugo and the Bay Area earthquake.
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NEWS
November 11, 1992 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hurricane Hugo's cruel winds ripped this little fishing village apart three years ago, more than a few people wondered if the town would recover. "We were pretty much ground zero," Mayor Rutledge Leland recalled recently. Boats were flung onto the shore, houses were blown into the streets. Many homes that remained in place lost their roofs or were flooded with murky salt water mixed with sewage.
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NEWS
January 7, 1992 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hurricane Hugo tore through the Francis Marion National Forest two years ago, it left foresters with a massive cleanup job and a question that still rages: How should the 250,000-acre forest be restored? Widely varying answers are coming from interests as diverse as timber companies and preservationists, bird watchers and duck hunters, hikers and motorcycle riders. Conservationists complain that the U.S.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hurricane Hugo tore through the Francis Marion National Forest two years ago, it left foresters with a massive cleanup job and a question that still rages: How should the 250,000-acre forest be restored? Widely varying answers are coming from interests as diverse as timber companies and preservationists, bird watchers and duck hunters, hikers and motorcycle riders. Conservationists complain that the U.S.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Several days after Hurricane Hugo ripped through Charleston, AT&T rushed a production crew there to film a promotional video. Originally, the video was supposed to be seen only by AT&T employees--as a way to show team spirit during a crisis. But the film footage of the devastation aftermath was so graphic, and in the case of one misty-eyed AT&T supervisor, so heart tugging, that the company took a different path.
NEWS
November 11, 1992 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hurricane Hugo's cruel winds ripped this little fishing village apart three years ago, more than a few people wondered if the town would recover. "We were pretty much ground zero," Mayor Rutledge Leland recalled recently. Boats were flung onto the shore, houses were blown into the streets. Many homes that remained in place lost their roofs or were flooded with murky salt water mixed with sewage.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS and PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Miriam Hilscher was knocked to the floor by a violent, unseen force and couldn't get up. She had no way of knowing whether her daughter and husband, in other parts of the house, were safe. Not until the rolling and shaking stopped 4 1/2 minutes later. The Hilschers all survived the gigantic, 8.5-magnitude earthquake that ripped through Alaska in 1964. One hundred and thirty-one others didn't.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
When it's all counted up, the damage from Hurricane Hugo may exceed $8 billion, the director of the National Hurricane Center said Thursday. Robert Sheets said the insurance industry is currently estimating its losses at $4 billion. "In the past we have found that total losses get close to two to three times the insurance loss," he told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | Associated Press
A subcontractor hired to help repair hundreds of Navy housing units in Charleston destroyed by Hurricane Hugo has sued contractors, including Irvine-based Fluor Daniel, for at least $50 million in damages. Meanwhile, the U.S. Justice Department is also investigating a case involving millions of dollars in alleged fraud in connection with the plan, called Project Hugo, the Post and Courier of Charleston reported Sunday.
NEWS
July 25, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Bob struck coastal communities in Georgia and South Carolina on Wednesday night with heavy rain, high tides and 75-m.p.h. winds, forcing thousands of persons to flee inland. The hurricane, the first of the Atlantic storm season, came ashore just north of Beaufort, S.C., after midnight, forecasters in Miami said. Several thousand persons moved inland as tides were whipped three to five feet above normal, said Paul Lunsford, a spokesman for the state emergency preparedness division.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | Associated Press
A subcontractor hired to help repair hundreds of Navy housing units in Charleston destroyed by Hurricane Hugo has sued contractors, including Irvine-based Fluor Daniel, for at least $50 million in damages. Meanwhile, the U.S. Justice Department is also investigating a case involving millions of dollars in alleged fraud in connection with the plan, called Project Hugo, the Post and Courier of Charleston reported Sunday.
NEWS
November 1, 1989 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS and PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Miriam Hilscher was knocked to the floor by a violent, unseen force and couldn't get up. She had no way of knowing whether her daughter and husband, in other parts of the house, were safe. Not until the rolling and shaking stopped 4 1/2 minutes later. The Hilschers all survived the gigantic, 8.5-magnitude earthquake that ripped through Alaska in 1964. One hundred and thirty-one others didn't.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Several days after Hurricane Hugo ripped through Charleston, AT&T rushed a production crew there to film a promotional video. Originally, the video was supposed to be seen only by AT&T employees--as a way to show team spirit during a crisis. But the film footage of the devastation aftermath was so graphic, and in the case of one misty-eyed AT&T supervisor, so heart tugging, that the company took a different path.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
When it's all counted up, the damage from Hurricane Hugo may exceed $8 billion, the director of the National Hurricane Center said Thursday. Robert Sheets said the insurance industry is currently estimating its losses at $4 billion. "In the past we have found that total losses get close to two to three times the insurance loss," he told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although they are a continent apart, the cities of Charleston, S.C., and San Francisco now share a fateful page in the ledger of time. They are the scenes of two of the century's costliest, back-to-back natural disasters: Hurricane Hugo and the Bay Area earthquake.
SPORTS
December 6, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Holder Jeff Feagles ran 24 yards on a fake field goal to set up Melvin Bratton's 4-yard go-ahead touchdown run in the second period, and second-ranked Miami held off eighth-ranked South Carolina, 20-16, Saturday night, setting up a national championship showdown with Oklahoma.
SPORTS
December 6, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Holder Jeff Feagles ran 24 yards on a fake field goal to set up Melvin Bratton's 4-yard go-ahead touchdown run in the second period, and second-ranked Miami held off eighth-ranked South Carolina, 20-16, Saturday night, setting up a national championship showdown with Oklahoma.
SPORTS
December 11, 1987
A University of South Carolina official, upset with alleged dirty play by Miami players in last weekend's football game, during which a fight erupted, said Thursday the Gamecocks won't play the Hurricanes anymore. "No, we will not schedule them," Athletic Director Bob Marcum said when asked of the possibility of future games. A Gator Bowl official and Miami Athletic Director Sam Jankovich got into a shouting match in the press elevator after the game.
NEWS
July 25, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Hurricane Bob struck coastal communities in Georgia and South Carolina on Wednesday night with heavy rain, high tides and 75-m.p.h. winds, forcing thousands of persons to flee inland. The hurricane, the first of the Atlantic storm season, came ashore just north of Beaufort, S.C., after midnight, forecasters in Miami said. Several thousand persons moved inland as tides were whipped three to five feet above normal, said Paul Lunsford, a spokesman for the state emergency preparedness division.
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