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July 2, 2009 | Kenneth Turan
It's no good moaning about how there's nothing to see this summer except movies based on toys. If you want adult films in theaters, you have to support the good ones the way kids support "Transformers" -- without reservation. Out right now is one of the year's best films, Kathryn Bigelow's "The Hurt Locker." It's got the killer impact of the explosive devices that are the heart of its plot: It simply blows you apart and doesn't bother putting you back together again.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
It's a man's world -- or at least that's the way it appears on screen. According to a report released Tuesday by San Diego State University film professor Martha Lauzen, the top 100 grossing films of 2013 were overwhelmingly male. Just 15% of protagonists, 29% of major characters and 30% of all speaking characters were female. The study looked at more than 2,300 characters in the 2013 films, and the lack of female representation -- on screen and behind the scenes -- has not substantially improved, said Lauzen, who serves as executive director of the SDSU Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010
Original screenplay 'The Hurt Locker' Mark Boal A war reporter turned screenwriter, Mark Boal spent time embedded with American bomb disposal experts in Iraq. From his experience was born his original screenplay for "The Hurt Locker," a high-stress, vérité -style drama that details a few months in the lives of bomb technicians working the front lines. "Oh, my God, thank you," Boal said upon accepting his award. "You honor me and humble me more than you know."
NEWS
December 27, 2012 | By Randee Dawn
When the Golden Globe nominations were announced in mid-December, no one really expected to hear from a little film that hit U.S. theaters the previous March. But "Salmon Fishing in the Yemen" scored three nods: a best picture slot and for its actors Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt. Few were as surprised about hearing that title announced as producer Paul Webster (who also has "Anna Karenina," which got only one Globe nomination, in the awards season melee). "I was so shocked," he says.
NEWS
December 23, 2009
Kathryn Bigelow has received a few genre awards for "Near Dark" and "Strange Days." But with "The Hurt Locker," it's a whole new game: CRITICS CHOICE AWARD 2010: Nominated as best director for "The Hurt Locker." GOLDEN GLOBES 2010: Nominations for best director and best motion picture drama for "The Hurt Locker." GOTHAM AWARDS 2009: Nominated for best film with producers Mark Boal, Nicolas Chartier and Greg Shapiro. 2009: Given the Tribute Award for career achievement.
NEWS
March 7, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
David slew Goliath. The small independent war drama "The Hurt Locker" won six Academy Awards on Sunday night, including best picture and director for Kathryn Bigelow -- marking the first time a woman has taken home such an honor. In doing so, the film, which has grossed less than $15 million, beat out the biggest box office film ever, James Cameron's sci-fi epic, "Avatar." Adding to the drama of it all: Bigelow used to be married to Cameron. "There's no other way to describe this, it's the moment of a lifetime," said a tremulous Bigelow, upon receiving the directing Oscar at the 82nd annual Academy Awards at the Kodak Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2010
Sound mixing "The Hurt Locker" Paul N.J. Ottosson and Ray Beckett In what was the second award of the night for sound editor Paul N.J. Ottosson and the first for mixer Ray Beckett, "The Hurt Locker" swept the sound categories, perhaps proof, at the least, of the common Oscar wisdom that the loudest war film always wins. The mixing took its cues from the characters in Kathryn Bigelow's testosterone-drenched film, as well as a rich sense of place. Speaking backstage, Ottosson called Staff Sgt. William James, played by Jeremy Renner, "a very confident man. So we were trying to duplicate that as well in sound throughout the movie."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2010 | By Henry Chu
"The Hurt Locker," a gripping ensemble drama about a bomb-disposal unit in Iraq, swept the British film awards Sunday, winning best picture and best director and beating out "Avatar" in nearly all categories in which both movies went head to head. It was a triumphant evening for "Hurt Locker" director Kathryn Bigelow, whose low-budget war drama nabbed six of the eight awards for which it was nominated, and a disappointment for her ex-husband, James Cameron, who looked on stoically as his 3-D extravaganza "Avatar," which earned him those same top prizes recently at the Golden Globes, managed wins only for visual effects and production design.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2010 | By Susan King
"Avatar" won a record-breaking six Critics' Choice Movie Awards on Friday night, but it was the independent Iraq war drama "The Hurt Locker" took home the best picture honors from the Broadcast Film Critics Assn. Kathryn Bigelow also won as director of the harrowing ensemble war film. "The Hurt Locker," which is nominated for best picture and director at Sunday's Golden Globes, has received the lion's share of critics' awards, including honors from the L.A. Film Critics Assn.
NEWS
December 23, 2009 | By Glenn Whipp
"Hurt Locker" screenwriter Mark Boal remembers running around the Jordanian desert with director Kathryn Bigelow, watching her scale hills in 115-degree heat to set up shots for their modestly budgeted film. By the end of the day, when everyone else was exhausted, Bigelow would look like she was just beginning her morning, raring and ready to go shoot the next scene. "She's got those Viking genes," Boal says. "I'm serious. They live forever, those people. It's the Viking genes and a whole lot of salmon."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp, Los Angeles Times
The New York Film Critics Circle's selection of "Zero Dark Thirty" as the year's best picture moves that film and its director, Kathryn Bigelow, whom the group also awarded, to the head of a pack of well-reviewed contenders at the beginning of an awards season that culminates Feb. 24 with the Oscars. "Zero Dark Thirty," the action thriller chronicling the decade-long hunt for and eventual killing of Osama bin Laden, has emerged as a favorite among reviewers and film writers since its initial screenings Thanksgiving weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Kathryn Bigelow and her screenwriter, Mark Boal, are now deep in the middle of the awards season push. Hot on the heels of the very well received first critics' screenings of their "Hurt Locker" follow-up, "Zero Dark Thirty," Bigelow and Boal are doing a big sit-down with ABC's "Nightline" on Monday night. The film, starring Jessica Chastain as a CIA agent, chronicles the U.S. manhunt for Osama bin Laden, culminating in the Navy SEAL raid on his hideout in Pakistan. Among the topics that Bigelow and Boal are addressing are the accusations that the filmmakers got improper access to classified documents in their preparation for the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
After kicking around the festival circuit for a few years, "Ingenious" finally sees release thanks in no small part to the risen fortunes of Jeremy Renner. Now, of course, Renner is a star in the Jason Bourne and "Avengers" action franchises, but before his Oscar-nominated turn in "The Hurt Locker," he was more or less a less a largely unknown working actor. Directed by Jeff Balsmeyer from a script by Mike Cram and based on a true story, the film is the tale of two friends, one an inventor (Dallas Roberts, himself a capable, underrated talent)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2010 | By John Horn and Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Beaten down by the recession? Want a sunny respite from the dreary weather? Need two hours to get away from the holiday stress? Hollywood has the answer: movies about a crumbling marriage, a 4-year-old's death in a car accident and a single father dying of cancer. The fall and winter movie seasons always deliver some demanding dramas, but the gloom factor this year feels so intense that "127 Hours" ? in which the lead character hacks off his own arm ? plays like a bubbly comedy in comparison.
NEWS
December 16, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Michael Douglas made the dark, indie comedy "Solitary Man" last year before being diagnosed with throat cancer. The irony of playing a man running from a doctor's diagnosis, fearful that his days are numbered, and with a smaller number than he had imagined, isn't lost on Douglas or the man who wrote the movie. "The film has a bizarre resonance, particularly that last hunk of dialogue Michael has in the movie where he says he's not going to let some diagnosis define him," says Brian Koppelman, who wrote "Solitary Man" and co-directed it with David Levien.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2010
Debra Granik's "Winter's Bone," a gritty drama about an Ozark teenager who must put herself in harm's way in her search for her drug-dealing father, was named best film of 2010 at the 20th anniversary Gotham Film Awards on Monday evening in New York. "Winter's Bone," the Grand Jury Prize winner at Sundance in January, also won for best ensemble performance for Jennifer Lawrence, John Hawkes, Dale Dickey, Lauren Sweetser, Garret Dillahunt and Devin Breznahan. Best documentary honors went to Laura Poitras' "The Oath.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2010 | By Susan King
"Avatar," "An Education" and "The Hurt Locker" dominated the nominations Thursday for the Orange British Academy Film Awards, receiving eight each. "Avatar," which won Golden Globes on Sunday for best dramatic film and director James Cameron, earned nominations from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts for best film, director, cinematography, editing, music, production design, sound and special visual effects. "An Education," about a British teenage girl's affair with an older man, received nominations for best film, outstanding British film, adapted screenplay (Nick Hornby)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2010
The boy wizard couldn't beat the teen vampires. "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows ? Part 1" sold $24 million in tickets in its debut late Thursday night with shows that started at or soon after midnight, according to an estimate from Warner Bros. That's $1.8 million more than the last movie in the series, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," brought in from midnight shows when it debuted in June 2009. It's well short, however, of the record set in July by "The Twilight Saga: Eclipse," which grossed more than $30 million during its late-night launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
Four years ago, a controversial British film called "Death of a President" stormed into the Toronto International Film Festival. The media was abuzz about its premise, which imagined that George W. Bush had been assassinated and Dick Cheney had ascended to the presidency. It became the hottest ticket of the festival that year and inspired intense debate about the limits of artistic and political expression — before fizzling in commercial release. Toronto, the preeminent North American gathering for top-tier filmmakers that starts Thursday and runs through next weekend, generates more heat and contention than almost any other festival.
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