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Hussein Kamel Hassan

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NEWS
May 7, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The first clues came in photographs. For years, in the endless pictures that the sycophantic Iraqi media published of President Saddam Hussein, the face of Hussein Kamel Hassan routinely would appear in a far-right corner. In the secretive world of Baghdad politics, where pictures often tell more than words about who's really who in the inner circle, those images were evidence that the trim, young Iraqi with the de rigueur Saddam-style mustache was on the fringe of power.
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NEWS
August 12, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defection of senior Iraqi officials to Jordan this week could well be the critical show of weakness in dictator Saddam Hussein's regime that U.S. officials have prayed for and plotted since the 1991 Persian Gulf War. When he led a convoy of armored sedans across the Iraqi desert and into Jordan on Tuesday, Lt. Gen.
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NEWS
March 3, 1992 | Associated Press
Saddam Hussein was reported Monday to have reinstated his son-in-law as chief of Iraq's arms and oil industries, effectively restoring him as the Iraqi leader's right-hand man. If the report is accurate, it marks a remarkable comeback for Gen. Hussein Kamel Hassan, who was the main architect of Iraq's largely clandestine nuclear, chemical warfare and long-range missile programs. It also would position him as the point man in Baghdad's campaign to impede U.N.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of dictator Saddam Hussein's daughters and the former head of his regime's clandestine arms industry are among more than a dozen top Iraqis who have defected, giving a rare glimpse of high-level tumult in Baghdad and prompting President Clinton to promise Thursday that America will defend Jordan if Iraq attempts to retaliate against it for granting the group asylum.
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American military cargo planes Sunday began parachuting emergency food supplies to suffering Kurdish refugees caught in the rugged mountain frontier region between Iraq and Turkey. A U.S. military officer at Incirlik Air Base in Turkey said that eight C-130 cargo planes loaded with food made the first drop to the several hundred thousand isolated Kurds on both sides of the Iraqi-Turkish border. British, French and German aircraft are expected to join in the emergency airlift today.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of dictator Saddam Hussein's daughters and the former head of his regime's clandestine arms industry are among more than a dozen top Iraqis who have defected, giving a rare glimpse of high-level tumult in Baghdad and prompting President Clinton to promise Thursday that America will defend Jordan if Iraq attempts to retaliate against it for granting the group asylum.
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The defection of senior Iraqi officials to Jordan this week could well be the critical show of weakness in dictator Saddam Hussein's regime that U.S. officials have prayed for and plotted since the 1991 Persian Gulf War. When he led a convoy of armored sedans across the Iraqi desert and into Jordan on Tuesday, Lt. Gen.
NEWS
November 7, 1991 | Associated Press
Saddam Hussein fired his son-in-law, considered the second most powerful man in Iraq, and replaced him as defense chief Wednesday with a cousin notorious for the brutal treatment of Kuwaitis and Kurds. The move marked a major change within the family circle that controls the ministries and security departments considered crucial for keeping Hussein in power after Iraq's Gulf War defeat. The report by the official Iraqi News Agency gave no reason for Hussein Kamel Hassan's departure.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With all of his muscle and all of his men, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein still can't put prewar Iraq back together again. Patches, PR and political shake-ups have not covered the cracks. The problems include inflation, shortages, Kurds and crime, and as the Iraqi strongman papers over one, another emerges. The voice of the man who influenced the Arab world as a military Colossus, a new Saladin, when the decade opened is now heard only in Iraq.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq launched a crash effort in 1990 to produce a nuclear bomb for use against U.S.-led forces massing in the Persian Gulf after the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait, U.S. and U.N. officials disclosed Friday. The effort, which accelerated an existing nuclear weapons program, was aimed at producing a weapon for use by April, 1991. The project was a response to the massive buildup in the Gulf region by a U.S.-led coalition that took Baghdad by surprise, according to Pentagon sources.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | Associated Press
Saddam Hussein was reported Monday to have reinstated his son-in-law as chief of Iraq's arms and oil industries, effectively restoring him as the Iraqi leader's right-hand man. If the report is accurate, it marks a remarkable comeback for Gen. Hussein Kamel Hassan, who was the main architect of Iraq's largely clandestine nuclear, chemical warfare and long-range missile programs. It also would position him as the point man in Baghdad's campaign to impede U.N.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The first clues came in photographs. For years, in the endless pictures that the sycophantic Iraqi media published of President Saddam Hussein, the face of Hussein Kamel Hassan routinely would appear in a far-right corner. In the secretive world of Baghdad politics, where pictures often tell more than words about who's really who in the inner circle, those images were evidence that the trim, young Iraqi with the de rigueur Saddam-style mustache was on the fringe of power.
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American military cargo planes Sunday began parachuting emergency food supplies to suffering Kurdish refugees caught in the rugged mountain frontier region between Iraq and Turkey. A U.S. military officer at Incirlik Air Base in Turkey said that eight C-130 cargo planes loaded with food made the first drop to the several hundred thousand isolated Kurds on both sides of the Iraqi-Turkish border. British, French and German aircraft are expected to join in the emergency airlift today.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on Wednesday named his half-brother to the powerful post of interior minister, putting the country's ruthless security forces firmly in family hands. The appointment was the Iraqi strongman's second move in a week to bind allegiance with blood, and it signaled his apparent concern about loyalty in the top ranks.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein secretly has begun arranging new sources of weapons and other military hardware and has shown other signs that he intends to reassert his role as an intimidating bully in the oil-rich Persian Gulf, U.S. government analysts said Friday. The warning about Hussein's new steps came in the wake of President Bush's vow to take military action, if necessary, to force Hussein to comply with U.N.
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