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Hustler Magazine

ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1997 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a lampoon that became an affront, which turned into a court case that gave us a movie to stir up a debate. So, naturally, naughty Larry Flynt's escapades wind up next, ahem, the toast of academia. Who better than Flynt to illustrate that plenty is never enough? And thanks to "The People vs. Larry Flynt," others are now being drawn forward to bask in the notoriety of a man who pleads guilty to heinous crimes of bad taste. All because there's a principle involved.
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NEWS
September 8, 1996 | IRENE LACHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most misunderstood man in America is sitting in his gold-plated wheelchair in a penthouse office on Wilshire Boulevard and waiting for his moment to arrive. In Larry Flynt's fondest dreams, that moment will make him whole, not merely a sum of his parts. In his most infamous guise, Flynt is a widely reviled pornographer, founder of the explicit Hustler magazine. Yet he was impotent for much of his reign, paralyzed from the hips down by a would-be assassin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990
The cartoonist who created the Hustler magazine feature "Chester the Molester" has been sentenced to six years in prison for molesting a teen-age girl. Dwaine B. Tinsley, 44, of Simi Valley was convicted in January of five counts of sexually assaulting a 13-year-old girl. The Superior Court jury acquitted him on six additional sex charges involving the same girl but were deadlocked on five others, which were dismissed, Deputy Dist. Atty. Matthew J. Hardy said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cartoonist who created the Hustler magazine feature "Chester the Molester" was convicted Friday of five counts of child molesting by a Ventura Superior Court jury that deliberated for five days. The jury of seven men and five women also acquitted the cartoonist of six charges, including incest and oral copulation, and deadlocked on another five counts of similar crimes. The cartoonist, Dwaine Tinsley, is scheduled to be sentenced March 1 by Judge Lawrence Storch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
A Beverly Hills private investigator, testifying Thursday in the "Cotton Club" murder hearing, implicated key prosecution witness William Rider in two murders and claimed that he was offered $15,000 by Rider to commit a third killing. Under cross-examination by defense lawyers, investigator Arthur Michael Pascal chipped away at Rider's credibility. Last week, Rider linked Hollywood mogul Robert Evans and "Cotton Club" defendant Elayne (Lanie) Greenberger to the 1983 slaying of theatrical producer Roy Radin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1989
Not too long ago Larry Flynt (publisher of Hustler magazine) wore our beloved flag as a diaper. I was enraged and The Times published my letter stating my feelings. Now that the Supreme Court has ruled it is permissible to desecrate our national symbol, I feel I owe Mr. Flynt a public apology. Sorry 'bout that, Larry. MARY E. HAYES Lakewood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
A Simi Valley cartoonist who created Hustler magazine's "Chester the Molester" cartoon and is charged with child molesting often said, "You can't write this stuff all the time if you don't experience it," according to court documents. The cartoonist, Dwaine Tinsley, 43, was arrested last month after an 18-year-old told police he had molested her for five years. Police searched Tinsley's home on May 18. The search warrant, which was filed Thursday in Ventura Municipal Court, included an affidavit by Simi Valley Detective Gary Gilloway outlining the statements of the young woman, who lives in Chatsworth.
NEWS
March 22, 1988 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether county child care workers may be held liable for "gross negligence" for failing to protect a child who was bruised, battered and nearly beaten to death by his father.
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