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NEWS
April 18, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the mammoth, government-owned utility Hydro-Quebec lost the lead foreign purchaser for its vast James Bay hydroelectric project, Canadians have been wondering whether Hydro-Quebec will go ahead with the mega-project on schedule--or at all. The James Bay project is a sprawling complex of hundreds of dams, dikes and generating stations in the northernmost reaches of Quebec. If its construction were halted completely, the effects would be felt throughout the Quebec economy and beyond.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1992
I have read with great interest your article "Cuomo Scores One for the Cree Nation" (by George Black, Column Left, April 6) on the cancellation of a contract between Hydro-Quebec and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) and its impact on the development of the Grande Baleine hydroelectric project in James Bay. Several statements call for rectification. It should first be noted that the Grande Baleine project was designed to meet the energy needs of the Quebec market. The sale of energy to the NYPA is a complementary aspect of the project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1992
I have read with great interest your article "Cuomo Scores One for the Cree Nation" (by George Black, Column Left, April 6) on the cancellation of a contract between Hydro-Quebec and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) and its impact on the development of the Grande Baleine hydroelectric project in James Bay. Several statements call for rectification. It should first be noted that the Grande Baleine project was designed to meet the energy needs of the Quebec market. The sale of energy to the NYPA is a complementary aspect of the project.
NEWS
April 18, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since the mammoth, government-owned utility Hydro-Quebec lost the lead foreign purchaser for its vast James Bay hydroelectric project, Canadians have been wondering whether Hydro-Quebec will go ahead with the mega-project on schedule--or at all. The James Bay project is a sprawling complex of hundreds of dams, dikes and generating stations in the northernmost reaches of Quebec. If its construction were halted completely, the effects would be felt throughout the Quebec economy and beyond.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New York state canceled a $13-billion contract for power from a utility whose hydroelectric project in northern Quebec is under attack by Indians and some environmentalists. Gov. Mario Cuomo said he had accepted a recommendation from the state Power Authority that the contract with Hydro-Quebec be canceled for economic reasons. The Hydro-Quebec project has been a centerpiece of Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa's economic development plan.
WORLD
February 17, 2005 | From Reuters
Canada's biggest electricity producer said Wednesday that it had stepped up security at its plants after a television report showed a journalist wandering unchallenged into the core of its largest generating station. "What I saw is not acceptable. We must act quickly and properly," said Andre Caille, president and chief executive of Hydro-Quebec, owned by Quebec province. Hydro-Quebec said it had begun 24-hour patrols at most of its electric power stations and major transmission posts.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | BRUCE DeSILVA, The Hartford Courant
In the wastes of northern Quebec, where the winter temperature sometimes falls to 60 degrees below zero, caribou outnumber people 40 to 1. Pike and whitefish grow huge but multiply slowly in 30 rivers and in uncounted thousands of frigid lakes. Stunted black spruce, larch and jack pine form sparse forests where the trunks of the biggest trees, the ones that have been growing for 100 years, are only 6 inches across. The forests fade into desolate reaches where little but moss and lichens grow.
NEWS
January 19, 1998 | Reuters
More than 280,000 Canadian homes and businesses--about 700,000 people--remained without power Sunday despite massive efforts by an army of workers to repair the devastating effects of the country's worst ice storm in living memory. In Quebec, worst hit by the blackout, 252,000 customers were waiting to be reconnected, and an official at the Hydro-Quebec utility said many would have to remain without power for a third week.
NEWS
September 8, 1992 | Reuters
Canada will dispatch a team of military engineers and a naval destroyer to help rebuild parts of Florida devastated two weeks ago by Hurricane Andrew, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney announced Monday. The 90 military engineers will work to restore electrical lines and rebuild hospitals, schools and community centers destroyed by the storm, Mulroney said in a statement.
NEWS
March 28, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New York state canceled a $13-billion contract for power from a utility whose hydroelectric project in northern Quebec is under attack by Indians and some environmentalists. Gov. Mario Cuomo said he had accepted a recommendation from the state Power Authority that the contract with Hydro-Quebec be canceled for economic reasons. The Hydro-Quebec project has been a centerpiece of Quebec Premier Robert Bourassa's economic development plan.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | United Press International
Two power failures blacked out Quebec province and some towns in far northern New England on Monday night and Tuesday morning, leaving more than 6 million people without electricity in near-freezing weather. Officials of the Hydro-Quebec utility blamed the blackouts on ice that accumulated on transmission lines during a snowstorm in northern Quebec. Officials said all but a handful of residents had their power restored by Tuesday afternoon.
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