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BUSINESS
July 20, 1988 | Associated Press
Coal industry officials predicted Tuesday that the nation's coal companies will have record production this year, as some utilities turn to coal-fired generators to replace hydroelectric power in this summer of drought and searing heat. In a midyear production forecast, the National Coal Assn. said production of bituminous, anthracite and lignite coal should total 926 million tons in 1988, up 9 million tons from last year's record.
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NATIONAL
July 27, 2009 | Kim Murphy
The Rocky Reach Dam has straddled the wide, slow Columbia River since the 1950s. It generates enough electricity to supply homes and industries across Washington and Oregon. But the dam in recent years hasn't produced as much power as it might: Its massive turbines act as deadly blender blades to young salmon, and engineers often have had to let the river flow over the spillway to halt the slaughter, wasting the water's energy potential.
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NEWS
March 31, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In another ominous sign for California heading into summer, when demand for electricity is highest, below-normal snowfall in the Sierra Nevada this winter will mean less water to create hydroelectric power. State officials Friday measured the accumulated snowfall and found it at 61% of its average level. April 1 is the traditional end of the rain and snow season. The last time the snowpack fell so far below average, in 1994, hydroelectric power production dipped by 25% to 30%.
NEWS
October 19, 2008 | Tom Pelton, Baltimore Sun
The century-old dam on the Susquehanna River doesn't look like an energy source of the future. Weeds sprout out of cracks in the weathered Holtwood Hydroelectric Dam, 12 miles upriver from Maryland. Inside the generating building, antique brass volt meters look like something from Dr. Frankenstein's lab. Water snakes slither across the floor. Despite the decrepit appearance, a Pennsylvania power company is planning to spend $350 million to build water-powered turbines next to the dam. The first new hydroelectric power plant in the East in 20 years, it would double the dam's electrical output, providing another 100,000 homes with pollution-free electricity, the company said.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1998
Ralph Nader's organization Public Citizen is quoted as stating that the marketing of "green" power in California is little more than a hoax on consumers, providing few benefits to the consumer ["Report Offers Pale Review of 'Green' Power," Oct. 22]. Mr. Nader contends that since none of the electricity being sold as "green" power is from "new renewable-energy projects," it is therefore not green power. Mr. Nader could not be more wrong on this issue. The whole point of deregulation is that there is an excess of electric power available in North America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000
Re "Democracy and the Electric Car Can Save Us," Commentary, June 30: Unless Ranan R. Lurie is talking fuel cells, he must not know that a huge percentage of the electricity available in the U.S. comes from the burning of (oh no!) fossil fuels. Upon rereading Lurie's piece, I also detect the faint aroma of--what--vendetta? Now, I don't like the Opeckers any better than the next American, but foisting phony "electric-powered" cars on us as the panacea for what seem to be his personal problems with "the Arab Middle East" is unacceptable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1987
Your Oct. 15 editorial "A Dream to Savor"--commenting on Secretary of the Interior Donald Hodel's proposal to tear down San Francisco's O'Shaughnessy Dam--failed to recognize San Francisco's responsible stewardship of the Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park. It took a great deal of vision, hard work, and indeed major technological innovations for San Francisco to build its Hetch Hetchy Water and Power System in the Sierra Nevada. And the idea of building a dam in a national park was controversial, but it was also thoroughly debated for years before being authorized by Congress.
NEWS
October 19, 2008 | Tom Pelton, Baltimore Sun
The century-old dam on the Susquehanna River doesn't look like an energy source of the future. Weeds sprout out of cracks in the weathered Holtwood Hydroelectric Dam, 12 miles upriver from Maryland. Inside the generating building, antique brass volt meters look like something from Dr. Frankenstein's lab. Water snakes slither across the floor. Despite the decrepit appearance, a Pennsylvania power company is planning to spend $350 million to build water-powered turbines next to the dam. The first new hydroelectric power plant in the East in 20 years, it would double the dam's electrical output, providing another 100,000 homes with pollution-free electricity, the company said.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This village in the steamy Sierra Maestra of poor, eastern Cuba lacks paved roads. But it does have street lights, a dozen of them, lining the hamlet's central dirt path. None of the shanties here has an indoor bathroom. But each boasts the same lawn decoration: a pole with two solar panels and a storage battery. Along with the dozen solar panels that power the village water pump, the lights and poles are a $35,000 solar-power gift from the government of India.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | HAROLD OLMOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the entrance of the world's biggest power station, not so far from the thundering Iguacu Falls, a sign in gigantic bold characters boasts: "One billion megawatts! Enough energy to illuminate the planet for a full month." Declared one of the seven engineering wonders of the world by the American Engineering Society after it opened in the mid-1980s, the Itaipu hydroelectric station produces a quarter of the energy driving Latin America's biggest economy.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2003 | Gene Laverty, Bloomberg News
California electricity prices may surge this summer, reaching levels last seen during the state's power crisis two years ago, as drought in the Pacific Northwest limits hydroelectric generation. The lack of snow and rain means flows will be at least 25% below normal at Columbia River dams, according to the Bonneville Power Administration, the federal agency that sells power from 31 dams in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and western Montana. Some meteorologists are forecasting even lower flows.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | HAROLD OLMOS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At the entrance of the world's biggest power station, not so far from the thundering Iguacu Falls, a sign in gigantic bold characters boasts: "One billion megawatts! Enough energy to illuminate the planet for a full month." Declared one of the seven engineering wonders of the world by the American Engineering Society after it opened in the mid-1980s, the Itaipu hydroelectric station produces a quarter of the energy driving Latin America's biggest economy.
NEWS
March 31, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In another ominous sign for California heading into summer, when demand for electricity is highest, below-normal snowfall in the Sierra Nevada this winter will mean less water to create hydroelectric power. State officials Friday measured the accumulated snowfall and found it at 61% of its average level. April 1 is the traditional end of the rain and snow season. The last time the snowpack fell so far below average, in 1994, hydroelectric power production dipped by 25% to 30%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2000
Re "Democracy and the Electric Car Can Save Us," Commentary, June 30: Unless Ranan R. Lurie is talking fuel cells, he must not know that a huge percentage of the electricity available in the U.S. comes from the burning of (oh no!) fossil fuels. Upon rereading Lurie's piece, I also detect the faint aroma of--what--vendetta? Now, I don't like the Opeckers any better than the next American, but foisting phony "electric-powered" cars on us as the panacea for what seem to be his personal problems with "the Arab Middle East" is unacceptable.
BUSINESS
November 15, 1998
Ralph Nader's organization Public Citizen is quoted as stating that the marketing of "green" power in California is little more than a hoax on consumers, providing few benefits to the consumer ["Report Offers Pale Review of 'Green' Power," Oct. 22]. Mr. Nader contends that since none of the electricity being sold as "green" power is from "new renewable-energy projects," it is therefore not green power. Mr. Nader could not be more wrong on this issue. The whole point of deregulation is that there is an excess of electric power available in North America.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This village in the steamy Sierra Maestra of poor, eastern Cuba lacks paved roads. But it does have street lights, a dozen of them, lining the hamlet's central dirt path. None of the shanties here has an indoor bathroom. But each boasts the same lawn decoration: a pole with two solar panels and a storage battery. Along with the dozen solar panels that power the village water pump, the lights and poles are a $35,000 solar-power gift from the government of India.
NATIONAL
July 27, 2009 | Kim Murphy
The Rocky Reach Dam has straddled the wide, slow Columbia River since the 1950s. It generates enough electricity to supply homes and industries across Washington and Oregon. But the dam in recent years hasn't produced as much power as it might: Its massive turbines act as deadly blender blades to young salmon, and engineers often have had to let the river flow over the spillway to halt the slaughter, wasting the water's energy potential.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, under federal court order to save endangered salmon stocks in the Northwest, Wednesday proposed what it called "major changes" in the way it operates the vast hydropower system of the Columbia and Snake rivers. But the Bonneville Power Administration says it will need federal assistance to compensate for those changes, and environmentalists say the plan does not change enough to help the dwindling salmon runs.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | DOUG CONNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration, under federal court order to save endangered salmon stocks in the Northwest, Wednesday proposed what it called "major changes" in the way it operates the vast hydropower system of the Columbia and Snake rivers. But the Bonneville Power Administration says it will need federal assistance to compensate for those changes, and environmentalists say the plan does not change enough to help the dwindling salmon runs.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | TED CILWICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Here in the heart of potato country, where the swift-flowing Snake River generates cheap electricity, people were both amused and scornful as they brushed aside Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn's recent proposal to channel river water to parched Southern California. Among themselves, though, Idahoans bicker fiercely over use of the Snake, which was named for its meandering 1,038-mile course.
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