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Hydroflouric Acid

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NEWS
May 6, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Powerine Oil Co.'s refinery in Santa Fe Springs does not have special equipment to handle a leak of highly corrosive hydrofluoric acid, according to a report presented Friday to the board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. And, based on information contained in the report, the special water spray safety systems at another Los Angeles-area refinery--Golden West Refining Co.'s facility in Santa Fe Springs--and at Allied Signal Corp.'s El Segundo chemical plant are not adequate to deal with a major leak, said David Schwien, a member of the air quality agency's task force studying hydrofluoric acid.
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NEWS
May 6, 1989 | GEORGE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Powerine Oil Co.'s refinery in Santa Fe Springs does not have special equipment to handle a leak of highly corrosive hydrofluoric acid, according to a report presented Friday to the board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. And, based on information contained in the report, the special water spray safety systems at another Los Angeles-area refinery--Golden West Refining Co.'s facility in Santa Fe Springs--and at Allied Signal Corp.'s El Segundo chemical plant are not adequate to deal with a major leak, said David Schwien, a member of the air quality agency's task force studying hydrofluoric acid.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1987 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Promising to "make an example" of illegal dumpers, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner announced Friday the filing of criminal charges against six companies and five people accused of illegally sending hazardous materials to Los Angeles County landfills. Those charged Friday ranged from small businessmen, such as the owners of cleaning and roofing companies, to a subsidiary of the giant Northrop Corp. The hazardous waste ranged from carcinogenic chemicals to cigarette lighters.
NEWS
January 5, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
A tank containing highly toxic, radioactive gas ruptured at a uranium-processing plant Saturday, killing a worker and sickening scores of employees and residents, authorities said. Eight employees of the Sequoyah Fuels Corp. plant who were initially exposed to the leak were taken to Sequoyah Memorial Hospital in Sallisaw immediately after the accident for treatment of exposure to the gas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1988 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, Times Staff Writer
An environmentalist and a research scientist told a legislative hearing Wednesday that use of acutely toxic hydrofluoric acid at Los Angeles-area oil refineries poses a potentially deadly threat to nearby residents. "Most of us live in blissful ignorance of the kind of hazards we are exposed to," said Fred Millar of the Environmental Policy Institute, a nonprofit group based in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
"Breaking Bad" is about to end its acclaimed run on AMC, but two guys from another cable outlet are scrambling to pay their respects. Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage of the Discovery Channel series "Mythbusters" are dedicating their Aug. 12 episode to the meth and crime series. Joining Hyneman and Savage on this episode are "Breaking Bad" creator Vince Gilligan and star Aaron Paul, who plays meth dealer Jesse Pinkman. But don't go in execpting Hyneman and Savage to try to re-create Walter White's supposedly top-notch blue crystal meth.
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