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Hydroponics

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NEWS
April 4, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No need for pesticides, Colombian agronomist Cesar Marulanda was telling 20 women. Just brush the aphids from the young lettuce leaves like this. "They fall off, and they don't have much chance of returning." Marulanda was talking about hydroponics--the growing of plants, not in soil, but in nutrient-rich solutions or moist, inert materials--and the women were paying close attention. Some were taking notes.
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REAL ESTATE
September 15, 1996 | JOEL RAPP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Somebody recently asked me what I knew about hydroponic gardening indoors. After thinking about the question for a moment I realized I didn't know very much. After more than 30 years as a serious indoor gardener, all I knew about hydroponics was that it's the practice of growing plants without soil, usually in water that's been amended with nutrients of some kind. My own experience had been limited to rooting cuttings in water and cultivating the occasional sweet potato in my youth.
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REAL ESTATE
September 15, 1996 | JOEL RAPP, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Somebody recently asked me what I knew about hydroponic gardening indoors. After thinking about the question for a moment I realized I didn't know very much. After more than 30 years as a serious indoor gardener, all I knew about hydroponics was that it's the practice of growing plants without soil, usually in water that's been amended with nutrients of some kind. My own experience had been limited to rooting cuttings in water and cultivating the occasional sweet potato in my youth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
An experiment in saving energy has blossomed into a greenhouse that uses waste heat from electric power plants to produce 250 tons of perfectly ripe, unblemished tomatoes every week. "Consumers for years have complained that [winter] tomatoes taste like the box they come in and that they are as hard as billiard balls," said Bud Bridgwater, marketing director for Colorado Greenhouse LLC in Fort Lupton. "We've put an end to that."
REAL ESTATE
August 18, 1991 | BILL SIDNAM, Sidnam has written garden columns and features for The Times since 1975
Hydroponic gardening is an idea that has never been more timely, says Steve Hollister, especially in this period of drought. Wait a minute--doesn't hydroponic gardening require water, not save it? Sure, says Hollister, but it uses only a fraction of the water necessary to maintain a garden planted in soil. For those not familiar with hydroponic, or soil-less, gardening, it works this way.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | HERB HAIN
Sally Lyons of Carlsbad would like to find some hydroponic planters like the ones she bought 10 years ago; they contained clay pebbles and a well in the bottom half to which a plant sent down its roots for nourishment. Can you help with a well-placed source before Lyons wonders if she is all wet? J. W. McCormick of Fullerton is looking for "invisible suspenders," which used to be available at fine haberdashers.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | Associated Press
A company is harvesting a steady year-round crop of spinach from seeds germinated in tiny polyester blankets, unaffected by the vagaries of the weather and nourished without soil or sunshine. This spinach feeds on a stream of liquid nutrients and grows during the night under the light of 1,000-watt bulbs. The manufacturer says its method works better than Mother Nature.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled among the rolling hills near Somis, Fred Ellrott Jr.'s greenhouse looksa heck of a lot like others dotting Ventura County's countryside. The rectangular structure is made of transparent, corrugated fiberglass. Take a peak inside and it seems like a normal greenhouse. Row after tidy row of verdant plant life--suspended on waist-high troughs--blanket the entire 1/2-acre space. The appearance is that of a lush green carpet hovering above the floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1996 | From Associated Press
An experiment in saving energy has blossomed into a greenhouse that uses waste heat from electric power plants to produce 250 tons of perfectly ripe, unblemished tomatoes every week. "Consumers for years have complained that [winter] tomatoes taste like the box they come in and that they are as hard as billiard balls," said Bud Bridgwater, marketing director for Colorado Greenhouse LLC in Fort Lupton. "We've put an end to that."
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A NASA aquanaut broke an undersea habitation record over the Fourth of July weekend after spending 60 days in a scuba divers' lodge submerged in a Florida Keys lagoon. Richard Presley, 33, a hydroponics engineer from Key Largo, had been at the bottom of the Emerald Lagoon since May 6. He was part of a NASA experiment on conditions astronauts would face during long space missions. The Jules' Undersea Lodge, once an undersea laboratory, is a steel and acrylic bubble.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestled among the rolling hills near Somis, Fred Ellrott Jr.'s greenhouse looksa heck of a lot like others dotting Ventura County's countryside. The rectangular structure is made of transparent, corrugated fiberglass. Take a peak inside and it seems like a normal greenhouse. Row after tidy row of verdant plant life--suspended on waist-high troughs--blanket the entire 1/2-acre space. The appearance is that of a lush green carpet hovering above the floor.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No need for pesticides, Colombian agronomist Cesar Marulanda was telling 20 women. Just brush the aphids from the young lettuce leaves like this. "They fall off, and they don't have much chance of returning." Marulanda was talking about hydroponics--the growing of plants, not in soil, but in nutrient-rich solutions or moist, inert materials--and the women were paying close attention. Some were taking notes.
REAL ESTATE
August 18, 1991 | BILL SIDNAM, Sidnam has written garden columns and features for The Times since 1975
Hydroponic gardening is an idea that has never been more timely, says Steve Hollister, especially in this period of drought. Wait a minute--doesn't hydroponic gardening require water, not save it? Sure, says Hollister, but it uses only a fraction of the water necessary to maintain a garden planted in soil. For those not familiar with hydroponic, or soil-less, gardening, it works this way.
NEWS
November 13, 1988 | Associated Press
A company is harvesting a steady year-round crop of spinach from seeds germinated in tiny polyester blankets, unaffected by the vagaries of the weather and nourished without soil or sunshine. This spinach feeds on a stream of liquid nutrients and grows during the night under the light of 1,000-watt bulbs. The manufacturer says its method works better than Mother Nature.
NEWS
June 23, 1988 | HERB HAIN
Sally Lyons of Carlsbad would like to find some hydroponic planters like the ones she bought 10 years ago; they contained clay pebbles and a well in the bottom half to which a plant sent down its roots for nourishment. Can you help with a well-placed source before Lyons wonders if she is all wet? J. W. McCormick of Fullerton is looking for "invisible suspenders," which used to be available at fine haberdashers.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
A raid on a marijuana farm hidden by thick vegetation netted about 7,200 plants Wednesday, some of them 7 feet tall, that had an estimated street value of $21 million, the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff's Department said. No arrests were immediately made. Investigators acting on an anonymous tip found the plants in nine "gardens" on a 20-acre site in a mountainous area of this unincorporated community, Sheriff's Lt. Steve Boltz said. The plants were three to four weeks from maturity, Boltz said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ventura College has received a $300,000 federal grant to train students for jobs in Ventura County's $1-billion farm industry. The grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will help establish courses that will train students for high-tech jobs in agriculture-related businesses, officials said.
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