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Hyman Belzberg

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BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the Newport Beach thrift and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Belzbergs Unveil Debt Plan: The Belzberg family unveiled a plan under which it would give up control of First City Financial Corp.--the core of its $6-billion empire--to satisfy the beleaguered diversified holding company's European creditors. The proposal asks holders of $139 million in bonds to convert them into equity. If accepted, the proposal would leave the bondholders with 49.9% of First City Financial's common stock.
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NEWS
January 12, 1991 | JOHN O'DELL and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulators Friday seized insolvent FarWest Savings & Loan Assn., the large thrift controlled by the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada, because of mounting losses from junk bonds and bad real estate loans. The failure of Newport Beach-based FarWest, which had $3.8 billion in assets, ranks among the largest in Southern California. Federal regulators would not estimate the cost of the collapse to taxpayers, but one industry analyst said it could approach $500 million.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1991 | James S. Granelli;Times staff writer
Federal regulators tried to apply some unusual pressure on the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada in an effort to stop FarWest Savings from going under, said one source familiar with negotiations before the Newport Beach thrift was seized last Friday. The Office of Thrift Supervision, the source said, suggested that the brothers might find it difficult to win approval for operating regulated companies in the United States if they washed their hands of the Newport Beach thrift.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1991 | James S. Granelli;Times staff writer
Federal regulators tried to apply some unusual pressure on the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada in an effort to stop FarWest Savings from going under, said one source familiar with negotiations before the Newport Beach thrift was seized last Friday. The Office of Thrift Supervision, the source said, suggested that the brothers might find it difficult to win approval for operating regulated companies in the United States if they washed their hands of the Newport Beach thrift.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Belzbergs Unveil Debt Plan: The Belzberg family unveiled a plan under which it would give up control of First City Financial Corp.--the core of its $6-billion empire--to satisfy the beleaguered diversified holding company's European creditors. The proposal asks holders of $139 million in bonds to convert them into equity. If accepted, the proposal would leave the bondholders with 49.9% of First City Financial's common stock.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the thrift and and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as so-called greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department announced Tuesday that it will sue New York real estate magnate Donald J. Trump and Canada's wealthy Belzberg family for evading antitrust notification rules on corporate takeovers. At the same time, Wickes Cos. of Santa Monica agreed to pay $300,000 to settle similar charges with the government in a case arising out of Wickes' unsuccessful $2.1-billion hostile takeover bid in August, 1986, for Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The credit crunch may be leaving most traditional lenders guarding their purse strings. But by acting as a financial middle-man, Pasadena-based Countrywide Credit Industries has boosted its mortgage banking business to record levels. Fresh from a new stock offering in September from which it raised $160 million, Countrywide has aggressively taken market share away from traditional lenders by financing home mortgage loans with money borrowed from banks. "We're opportunists," said Angelo R.
NEWS
January 12, 1991 | JOHN O'DELL and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal regulators Friday seized insolvent FarWest Savings & Loan Assn., the large thrift controlled by the wealthy Belzberg brothers of Canada, because of mounting losses from junk bonds and bad real estate loans. The failure of Newport Beach-based FarWest, which had $3.8 billion in assets, ranks among the largest in Southern California. Federal regulators would not estimate the cost of the collapse to taxpayers, but one industry analyst said it could approach $500 million.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the thrift and and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as so-called greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
FarWest Savings had long been a good investment for the Belzberg brothers of Canada--Samuel, Hyman and William. Acquiring FarWest in 1974 gave the Belzbergs a foothold in the United States. Then, using the Newport Beach thrift and First City Financial Corp. Ltd. in Vancouver, Canada, they became among the most feared corporate raiders and takeover strategists on the U.S. scene during the 1980s. Often acting as greenmailers, their hostile bids made them millions of dollars. But today, their U.S.
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