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Hymie Singer

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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Sitting at anchor at a permanent mooring still under construction, the SS Catalina--familiar to generations of Californians as the Great White Steamer--seems a bit like a bag lady who, unexpectedly having been offered a home and job, gets unsteadily to her feet, still skeptical that it can be true.
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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
Sitting at anchor at a permanent mooring still under construction, the SS Catalina--familiar to generations of Californians as the Great White Steamer--seems a bit like a bag lady who, unexpectedly having been offered a home and job, gets unsteadily to her feet, still skeptical that it can be true.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Valentine's Day gift Ruth Singer received years ago could not be wrapped up neatly in a jewelry box, or even hidden under the bed until the special day arrived. Her gift was 307 feet long and had been used by more than 25 million people. For Valentine's Day in 1977, Singer's husband gave her the fabled Catalina, known as the Great White Steamer, that ferried passengers between San Pedro and Avalon for more than 50 years, starting in 1924.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1985 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Coast Guard is seeking a legal remedy to the problems of the restless 310-foot SS Catalina, the Great White Steamer, which has strayed from its moorings in Los Angeles Harbor twice within two months. Lt. Cmdr. Michael Barrier, assistant legal officer of the 11th Coast Guard District, said Thursday the U.S. attorney's office is expected to bring suit in Admiralty Court for salvage claims to meet costs incurred by the Coast Guard because of what he called owner negligence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2009 | Bob Pool
In the end, the Great White Steamer was a great white elephant. The island town of Avalon didn't want the SS Catalina, which for 50 glorious years ferried about 25 million people to its shores. Neither did the Port of Los Angeles, or harbors in San Diego, Vancouver and Honolulu. And, finally, neither did the Port of Ensenada. That's why Mexican demolition workers are putting an end to a three-decade campaign to preserve the once-proud steamship by cutting the 302-foot vessel apart for scrap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 33 years, David Engholm has had an unrequited love affair. And now the love of his life is sinking off the coast of Baja California. Engholm is enamored with the SS Catalina, a Great White Steamer that plowed the channel between San Pedro and Santa Catalina Island for more than 50 years until 1975. After a series of legal battles and failed business ventures, the 301-foot Catalina ended up in the Port of Ensenada, where it began sinking late last year. Now 50% of it is underwater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1986 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Its gleaming decks carried three generations to an island hideaway 26 miles out to sea, shuttling presidents, movie stars and 25 million others between San Pedro and Santa Catalina Island for more than 50 years. The SS Catalina--better known as the Great White Steamer--was one of the last of the nation's fabled steamships, a remnant of Southern California's playful past.
NEWS
March 10, 1985 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
A proud old American has taken refuge in Mexico, perhaps never to return. She's the 310-foot steamship Catalina, the Great White Steamer, which plied the Catalina Channel over a period of more than 50 years, hauling millions of Americans--Presidents, movie stars, baseball heroes and ordinary folk--between San Pedro and Avalon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1986 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Its gleaming decks carried three generations to an island hideaway 26 miles out to sea, shuttling presidents, movie stars and 25 million others between San Pedro and Santa Catalina Island for more than 50 years. The S.S. Catalina--better known as the Great White Steamer--was one of the last of the nation's fabled steamships, a remnant of Southern California's playful past.
TRAVEL
July 31, 1988 | MICHELE GRIMM and TOM GRIMM, The Grimms of Laguna Beach are authors of "Away for the Weekend," a travel guide to Southern California.
Not so long ago, visitor activities in this Baja California seaport seemed limited to sipping margaritas at its infamous cantina, Hussong's, and shopping for souvenirs. These days there's much more to do, including a ride along the bayfront boulevard in a horse-drawn carriage. You can tour Baja's biggest and best winery, Bodegas de Santo Tomas, and watch weekend bullfights in a new arena that opened this month.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
My earliest memory is of being on that boat. I was just short of my fourth birthday when my father lifted me over the railing so I could look down at the deep blue water and watch all the other boats as we glided into Avalon Bay. There were generations of us who made that 26-mile voyage from Wilmington to Avalon in the most glorious style from 1924 to 1975 on the SS Catalina, the Great White Steamship, a boat that carried about 25 million passengers over that period.
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