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Hyoung Pak

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A prominent businessman in Southern California's Korean community began serving 28 days of court-ordered house arrest Thursday in a dilapidated apartment building he owns in downtown Los Angeles. Hyoung Pak, 48, is the second convicted slumlord in the city's history to be temporarily banished to a fate endured by his tenants.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1988 | EDWIN CHEN, Times Staff Writer
A prominent businessman in Southern California's Korean community began serving 28 days of court-ordered house arrest Thursday in a dilapidated apartment building he owns in downtown Los Angeles. Hyoung Pak, 48, is the second convicted slumlord in the city's history to be temporarily banished to a fate endured by his tenants.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1988 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
A Rolling Hills man who bought apartment buildings from a convicted slumlord was sentenced Thursday to the same thing as his predecessor--confinement for 30 days on his run-down property in addition to a term in the County Jail. The sentence Los Angeles Municipal Court Commissioner Juleann Cathey imposed on Hyoung Pak was the latest action after Pak's guilty plea last October to nine counts of city health, building and safety code violations in the aging apartment buildings at 1821 and 1839 S.
NEWS
December 2, 1987 | JILL STEWART, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual ruling that may help close a loophole used by slumlords, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge Tuesday ordered convicted slumlord Dr. Milton Avol to renovate a dilapidated apartment building that houses 130 families near downtown, even though the Beverly Hills neurosurgeon no longer owns it. Judge Christian E. Markey Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1988 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, Times Staff Writer
Tenants who endured rats, cockroaches, broken plumbing and collapsed ceilings in a run-down building in downtown Los Angeles will receive $2.5 million in an out-of-court settlement of their lawsuit against the building's owner, convicted slumlord Milton Avol. The award, described by attorneys as the largest such settlement of a landlord-tenant suit in California, will mean average payments of $30,000 to $35,000 each to 70 families who sued Avol in 1985 for slum conditions at 1821 and 1839 S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1987 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Saying that even jail sentences have failed to deter Los Angeles' slumlords, two City Council members proposed legislation Thursday that would empower the city to seize rents and use the money to finance repairs. In a press conference staged near a graffiti-smeared building formerly owned by convicted slumlord Dr.
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