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Hyperbaric Medicine

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Potter was scared and in tears after learning that an infection in his left toe might cost him his leg. So he went to the hyperbaric medicine department at Northridge Hospital Medical Center for a second opinion. A doctor told Potter, a diabetic, that his ruptured toe blister could be treated with a combination of antibiotics and the hyperbaric chamber, which suffuses non-healing wounds with concentrated oxygen.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panic struck 60 feet down. A student in John Corso's scuba class had spit out her regulator. Survival instincts took over as she found herself unable to breathe. She bolted for the surface in a rush of adrenaline. Corso pursued. He tried to slow her ascent, mindful of what can happen when compressed air expands too fast in the body, like gas fizzing from a bottle of champagne. Two-thirds of the way up, it was Corso--not the student--who got slammed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when he was a Navy medical officer in the 1960s, Dr. John M. Alexander used decompression chambers to treat deep-sea divers suffering from the bends, a potentially fatal condition caused by surfacing too quickly. Today, as director of the West Coast's largest civilian decompression facility, at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, Alexander treats patients whose problems usually have nothing to do with diving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mike Potter was scared and in tears after learning that an infection in his left toe might cost him his leg. So he went to the hyperbaric medicine department at Northridge Hospital Medical Center for a second opinion. A doctor told Potter, a diabetic, that his ruptured toe blister could be treated with a combination of antibiotics and the hyperbaric chamber, which suffuses non-healing wounds with concentrated oxygen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panic struck 60 feet down. A student in John Corso's scuba class had spit out her regulator. Survival instincts took over as she found herself unable to breathe. She bolted for the surface in a rush of adrenaline. Corso pursued. He tried to slow her ascent, mindful of what can happen when compressed air expands too fast in the body, like gas fizzing from a bottle of champagne. Two-thirds of the way up, it was Corso--not the student--who got slammed.
HEALTH
July 13, 2009 | Chris Woolston
Over the years, Michael Jackson has graced more tabloid covers than any other celebrity, the ghost of Elvis included. One memorable tabloid photo from the mid-1980s showed Jackson lying peacefully in a hyperbaric chamber, presumably part of his plan to stay young forever. Perhaps inspired by that iconic image, many health seekers have climbed into hyperbaric chambers of their own. The prospect of slowing or reversing aging is one big draw.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1994
Pure oxygen treatments have begun to kill the virulent strep infection that was destroying the skin and tissue on a Fillmore woman's leg, according to officials at Los Robles Regional Medical Center. Guadalupe Pulido, 63, was rushed to the Thousand Oaks hospital Friday for special therapy to treat a condition popularly known as "flesh-eating bacteria." What started as a pimple a week earlier had spread from her groin to her knee and across her leg. Dr. J.B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1985 | PENELOPE McMILLAN and MICHAEL SEILER, Times Staff Writers
A total of 48 Mount St. Mary's College students have been treated in a compression chamber for the after-effects of a carbon monoxide leak from a gas heater eight days ago, college and hospital officials said Thursday. The students--suffering chiefly from loss of memory, light-headedness and nausea--were placed in the large chamber for two hours to breathe pure oxygen under barometric pressure twice that of sea level to purge their bloodstreams and body tissue of the gas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suffering no more than mild burns, singed hair and a slight case of amnesia, a Canyon Country man struck by lightning is quickly recovering from his injuries and may be home as soon as today. Doctors at Northridge Hospital Medical Center said Guy Arnone, 30, who was knocked unconscious by a lightning bolt during a freak rainstorm in Calabasas on Thursday afternoon, was initially listed in critical condition. But Friday, Dr. John Alexander said Arnone is eating, talking and doing well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when he was a Navy medical officer in the 1960s, Dr. John M. Alexander used decompression chambers to treat deep-sea divers suffering from the bends, a potentially fatal condition caused by surfacing too quickly. Today, as director of the West Coast's largest civilian decompression facility, at Northridge Hospital Medical Center, Alexander treats patients whose problems usually have nothing to do with diving.
NEWS
June 12, 1996
The L.A. Times should be congratulated for the timely article on the use of hyperbaric oxygen (May 2, "A Healing Atmosphere"). It is a very much underused but very beneficial therapy for a variety of medical conditions. As mentioned in the article, I am the "operator" of six hyperbaric chambers and have used hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of patients who suffer chronically from the effects of a stroke for the past five years. The article stated that the American Stroke Assn.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Roehl Reyes shot to the ocean surface from a depth of 108 feet, his lungs felt as if they would explode. That was the last thing Reyes remembered before he blacked out. Dangerous nitrogen bubbles formed throughout his bloodstream, plunging his body deep into shock. A Coast Guard helicopter rushed his limp body from the waters near Anacapa Island to a decompression chamber at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks.
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