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Hyperion Sewage Treatment Plant

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April 5, 1992 | GEORGE HATCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A woman once called the Hyperion sewage treatment plant in a panic: She accidentally flushed her wedding ring down the toilet. Never mind that the huge Playa del Rey plant handles more than 300 million gallons of sewage a day--enough to fill the Forum in Inglewood three times over. The woman wanted Hyperion engineer John Crosse to find her ring. Crosse, now the plant's manager, recalled the incident, laughing and shaking his head: "I told her I'd keep an eye out for it."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1999
After a briefing from officials in the city attorney's office and Department of Public Works, a key City Council member said Monday that she is satisfied with the city's efforts to resolve a number of contract disputes arising from a massive expansion of the Hyperion sewage treatment plant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major construction company has filed a $66-million lawsuit against the city of Los Angeles, claiming that the government first bungled plans for expanding a huge sewage treatment plant and then negotiated in bad faith over a proposed settlement with the company. The suit, filed by Dillingham Construction Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1991
El Segundo officials are taking the city of Los Angeles to court over its plan to overhaul and expand the huge Hyperion sewage treatment plant in Playa del Rey. In a suit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, El Segundo seeks to block the project until Los Angeles gauges how the expanded plant will affect nearby residents. Attorneys for El Segundo, which borders the plant, say air pollution is the city's chief concern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1991
Plans to broaden the scope of a project to overhaul the huge Hyperion sewage treatment plant won approval of the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday despite strong objections from El Segundo city leaders. By a 13-0 vote, the council approved plans to make Los Angeles' Playa del Rey plant capable of providing intensified treatment for 450 million gallons of sewage a day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1988
After receiving assurances from the City of Los Angeles that foul odors from the Hyperion Sewage Treatment plant will be controlled, the El Segundo City Council has approved plans for the facility's expansion. By a 3-2 vote, council members agreed Tuesday night to give Los Angeles the permit it needs to build a new sedimentation tank at the plant. Los Angeles needed the approval because 6% of the tank will be in El Segundo.
NEWS
August 7, 1987
A malfunction at Los Angeles' Hyperion sewage treatment plant allowed about 3.7 million gallons of treated water to flow into the Pacific Ocean about a mile offshore, a Department of Public Works spokeswoman said. An undetermined quantity of raw, untreated sewage was also discharged five miles off the coast, Anna Sklar said. The discharge of chlorinated waste did not pose a public health hazard, Sklar said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1987
The El Segundo City Council is balking at approving the expansion of the Hyperion sewage treatment plant, insisting that Los Angeles first control odors and noise there. Citing a "history of bad communication with Los Angeles," Mayor Jack Siadek postponed a council decision this week, continuing a hearing on the issue indefinitely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1988
The city Board of Public Works on Wednesday approved the purchase of a $3.5-million research boat to monitor the release of waste water from the Hyperion sewage treatment plant into the Santa Monica Bay. The 85-foot boat will replace a 1950s vessel with a hull that makes it too unstable to do water testing in choppy seas, said Harry Sizemore, assistant director of the city's Bureau of Sanitation. The new boat will enable city marine biologists to work in choppy seas, Sizemore said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' Hyperion Waste Water Treatment Plant, once a major polluter of Santa Monica Bay, is now a gleaming model of environmental protection. But beneath the hoopla surrounding that $1.6-billion transformation are a host of costly mistakes that have already bankrupted some of the project's contractors and may eventually cost city residents $100 million more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1996
Officials at a sewage treatment plant who were forced to release partially treated waste into the Santa Monica Bay say they have adjusted an electrical protection system to prevent future spills, officials said. The massive Aug. 10 power outage that jammed communications and shut down businesses across the western United States also caused the Hyperion Treatment Plant in Playa del Rey to dump 10 million gallons of partially treated sewage a mile offshore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1996 | JAMES RAINEY and JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Responding to a study linking storm drain runoff with illness in some Santa Monica Bay swimmers, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan on Tuesday pledged to spend at least $15 million to divert 14 polluted urban streams away from the ocean and to the city's sewage treatment plant. It remains to be seen whether the City Council and the public will support the increase in property taxes that the mayor's office said eventually would be needed to pay for the proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing impatient with the Riordan Administration's delay of a court-ordered upgrading of the Hyperion sewage treatment plant, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday took the highly unusual step of directly awarding a multimillion-dollar contract to get the project back on track.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1995 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late 1970s, the U.S. government offered local sanitation officials a deal that would have made Rumpelstiltskin smile. If they would try out a new technology that promised to turn sewage into valuable electricity, the Feds would foot most of the multimillion-dollar bill. The process, originally designed to extract vitamins from fish livers, had never been used in a major sewage plant. But Los Angeles City Hall and the separate county sanitation agency signed up anyway, convinced that the costly gamble was worth the risks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS and LORENZA MUNOZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan raised the stakes in an emotional environmental debate by suggesting this week that the city should re-examine its commitment to providing advanced treatment of ocean-bound sewage. Arguing that the court-imposed treatment has caused water bills to skyrocket and hampered the local economy, Riordan wants to study whether the city should scale back a $1.6-billion expansion project at the Hyperion Treatment Plant in Playa del Rey, according to a top aide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1993 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A long-running wrangle between Los Angeles and neighboring cities about how to split the bill for sewage treatment and for the cost of improvements to the Hyperion sewage treatment plant in Playa Del Rey has degenerated into a tangle of litigation. In recent weeks, Los Angeles has filed suits against Santa Monica, Beverly Hills, Culver City and county Sanitation District 4, which oversees West Hollywood's sewage treatment at the Hyperion plant.
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