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Hyperthyroidism

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NATIONAL
August 16, 2007 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
An epidemic of thyroid disease among pet cats could be caused by toxic flame retardants that are widely found in household dust and some pet food, government scientists reported Wednesday. The often-lethal disease was rare in cats until the 1980s, when it began appearing widely, particularly in California cats.
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NATIONAL
August 16, 2007 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
An epidemic of thyroid disease among pet cats could be caused by toxic flame retardants that are widely found in household dust and some pet food, government scientists reported Wednesday. The often-lethal disease was rare in cats until the 1980s, when it began appearing widely, particularly in California cats.
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NEWS
May 16, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that he has lost 10 pounds in the last three weeks, is feeling fatigued and has decided to extend his Memorial Day vacation next week as he adjusts to the medication designed to cure his thyroid disorder. "Lowest I've been in 30 years," Bush said of his weight, 187 pounds. "I'd like to keep it off."
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | From United Press International
President Bush, in a discussion of his continuing treatment for a hyperactive thyroid, reported Wednesday some initial "slowing down of the mental process" because of medication taken to correct the disorder. In an interview, he discussed the outlook for a rapid recovery from his recently diagnosed condition.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush is suffering from Graves' disease, a common and treatable thyroid condition that is not life-threatening, his physicians announced Thursday. "The President remains in excellent spirits, is in good health, without adverse symptoms of any kind," said Dr. Burton Lee, Bush's personal physician. He said that he and Bush's other physicians have urged the President to relax his schedule temporarily.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's doctors said Tuesday they believe they have found the cause of his recent heart irregularity--a mildly overactive thyroid gland that is expected to be easily treatable. In a briefing at Bethesda Naval Medical Center, Bush's chief physician, Dr. Burton Lee, said he was "pleased by this turn of events" because it cleared up questions about the cause of Bush's ailment and because such problems are "usually resolved within a short time."
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | From United Press International
President Bush, in a discussion of his continuing treatment for a hyperactive thyroid, reported Wednesday some initial "slowing down of the mental process" because of medication taken to correct the disorder. In an interview, he discussed the outlook for a rapid recovery from his recently diagnosed condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1991 | LONNY SHAVELSON, Lonny Shavelson is a physician and photojournalist who writes for Pacific News Service
With the announcement that President Bush has been suffering from Graves' disease--an overactive thyroid gland--the American public has a right to ask whether the disability could have affected his decision-making activities during the Gulf War. The thyroid gland secretes a hormone that sets the body's basic rate of metabolism and energy use. When it acts up, as George Bush's did, the body simply speeds up. Bush lost 10 pounds in three weeks without dieting.
SPORTS
April 30, 1988
Golfer Pat Bradley will not play until at least June while she is receiving treatment for hyperthyroidism, it was announced by the Ladies Professional Golf Assn.
NEWS
June 23, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Missy Elliott has been out of the limelight for a few years now because she’s battling Graves' disease, undergoing treatment that has included radiation, according to media reports . The disease, which affects the thyroid gland, may not be familiar to most people, but it can cause a long litany of unpleasant symptoms. Essentially, Graves' disease causes too much thyroid hormone to be produced, a condition called hyperthyroidism. The thyroid gland’s hormones help regulate the body’s metabolism, affecting mood, weight and energy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1991 | LONNY SHAVELSON, Lonny Shavelson is a physician and photojournalist who writes for Pacific News Service
With the announcement that President Bush has been suffering from Graves' disease--an overactive thyroid gland--the American public has a right to ask whether the disability could have affected his decision-making activities during the Gulf War. The thyroid gland secretes a hormone that sets the body's basic rate of metabolism and energy use. When it acts up, as George Bush's did, the body simply speeds up. Bush lost 10 pounds in three weeks without dieting.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Wednesday that he has lost 10 pounds in the last three weeks, is feeling fatigued and has decided to extend his Memorial Day vacation next week as he adjusts to the medication designed to cure his thyroid disorder. "Lowest I've been in 30 years," Bush said of his weight, 187 pounds. "I'd like to keep it off."
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush is suffering from Graves' disease, a common and treatable thyroid condition that is not life-threatening, his physicians announced Thursday. "The President remains in excellent spirits, is in good health, without adverse symptoms of any kind," said Dr. Burton Lee, Bush's personal physician. He said that he and Bush's other physicians have urged the President to relax his schedule temporarily.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's doctors said Tuesday they believe they have found the cause of his recent heart irregularity--a mildly overactive thyroid gland that is expected to be easily treatable. In a briefing at Bethesda Naval Medical Center, Bush's chief physician, Dr. Burton Lee, said he was "pleased by this turn of events" because it cleared up questions about the cause of Bush's ailment and because such problems are "usually resolved within a short time."
SPORTS
August 27, 1990 | Associated Press
Marty Lyons, the most experienced player on the New York Jets' young defense, will miss the 1990 season after undergoing surgery on his right arm. Lyons, 33, sustained a torn bicep muscle during a preseason game Saturday against the New York Giants. He will need at least 12 weeks for rehabilitation and was placed on injured reserve today. The Jets may also lose defensive lineman Paul Frase, who was placed on the non-football illness list with hyper-thyroidism.
NEWS
July 24, 1992 | MALCOLM GLADWELL, WASHINGTON POST
You may have thought there was enough bad news in the world. You are wrong. For reasons no one can explain, thousands of America's cats are coming down with a once rare glandular disorder. The disease, a tumor of the thyroid, affects primarily middle-aged cats. Exceedingly rare in humans and unknown in other species, it results in the uncontrolled production of thyroid hormones, leading to severe weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea, skin disease, abnormal breathing and cardiac problems.
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