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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1999 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
The Yellow Pages ads beckon. "Hypnotherapy as a career." "Become a certified hypnotherapist." A form of behavior modification that involves deep relaxation and intense concentration, hypnotherapy is riding the wave of increased acceptance among alternative forms of health care, health-care experts say. And as the number of potential clients increases, so does the number of people who find such ads, and the training programs behind them, alluring.
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
February 24, 2008 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
A questionnaire for new clients at the Murad health center, a spa in El Segundo, wants to know everything about you. Ever had heart problems? How about back pain? And what if you had no obligations tomorrow? Do you have any meaningful plans for the rest of your life? The 34-page lifestyle Q&A doesn't hold back. It wants to know "the last time you felt really well" and whether you "begin the day with activities that nurture your body and spirit."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arnold Furst, 83, a magician and hypnotist who entertained and instructed others in using his techniques as therapy, died Feb. 22 in Los Angeles of natural causes after several years of failing health. Furst began his professional act in 1939 and toured the globe with the USO during World War II, always traveling noticeably with his white rabbit, Oscar. After the war, he worked in vaudeville and had a nightclub act combining magic and hypnotism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arnold Furst, 83, a magician and hypnotist who entertained and instructed others in using his techniques as therapy, died Feb. 22 in Los Angeles of natural causes after several years of failing health. Furst began his professional act in 1939 and toured the globe with the USO during World War II, always traveling noticeably with his white rabbit, Oscar. After the war, he worked in vaudeville and had a nightclub act combining magic and hypnotism.
SPORTS
July 5, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
You probably don't inquire about the advanced education of anybody who wears a cap to work (never mind the funny socks). Either he's skilled in the operation of heavy equipment or he can throw a slider, but he has probably never taken corporate tax law. Yet here's Tom House, pitching coach of the Texas Rangers, and he has got more degrees than your average business department. Tom House's academic career so far: He has a B.S.
SPORTS
October 22, 1995 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a sports cliche that goes something like this: Don't think, just play. A tennis player, for example, has to make such quick decisions on a court that if he actually stops to think about them, he's done. Not enough time. Enter Dr. William Bays, a hypnotherapist who helps teach athletes to, uh, not think. When Bays isn't talking to patients about losing weight or quitting smoking, he is often talking about sports.
IMAGE
February 24, 2008 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
A questionnaire for new clients at the Murad health center, a spa in El Segundo, wants to know everything about you. Ever had heart problems? How about back pain? And what if you had no obligations tomorrow? Do you have any meaningful plans for the rest of your life? The 34-page lifestyle Q&A doesn't hold back. It wants to know "the last time you felt really well" and whether you "begin the day with activities that nurture your body and spirit."
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | MARYAM HENEIN
Think of hypnosis and most likely you will envision a pendular watch or spiraling black-and-white circle. That was the 1800s. Today, hypnotherapists not only use different techniques but are breaking new ground with the help of one of the state's largest health-care providers. Last month, Blue Cross of California launched its Hypnotherapy Network.
HEALTH
December 23, 2002 | Dianne Partie Lange
Hypnosis has been so effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome that British researchers recently tested its usefulness for chronic indigestion. More than 100 people at the Wythenshawe Hospital in Manchester, England, were assigned to receive 12 30-minute sessions of either hypnotherapy, supportive therapy and a placebo medication, or medication (rantidine twice a day) over 16 weeks.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1993 | Researched by MIMI KO / Los Angeles Times
Name: James Harder Company: James Harder, Ph.D., Newport Beach Thumbs up: "Unlike traditional psychotherapy, clinical hypnosis can bring about a long-lasting and very rapid change in behavior. It is very safe and positive and more affordable, which is especially needed in our tight economy. In addition, the American Medical Assn. has endorsed clinical hypnosis since 1958, and it is a standard subject taught in medical schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1999 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
The Yellow Pages ads beckon. "Hypnotherapy as a career." "Become a certified hypnotherapist." A form of behavior modification that involves deep relaxation and intense concentration, hypnotherapy is riding the wave of increased acceptance among alternative forms of health care, health-care experts say. And as the number of potential clients increases, so does the number of people who find such ads, and the training programs behind them, alluring.
SPORTS
October 22, 1995 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a sports cliche that goes something like this: Don't think, just play. A tennis player, for example, has to make such quick decisions on a court that if he actually stops to think about them, he's done. Not enough time. Enter Dr. William Bays, a hypnotherapist who helps teach athletes to, uh, not think. When Bays isn't talking to patients about losing weight or quitting smoking, he is often talking about sports.
SPORTS
July 5, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
You probably don't inquire about the advanced education of anybody who wears a cap to work (never mind the funny socks). Either he's skilled in the operation of heavy equipment or he can throw a slider, but he has probably never taken corporate tax law. Yet here's Tom House, pitching coach of the Texas Rangers, and he has got more degrees than your average business department. Tom House's academic career so far: He has a B.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2007 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood rehab can produce unhappy endings, even when the patient isn't named Lindsay or Britney. That's what Kelly Logan learned when he sought treatment for a methamphetamine addiction at Promises Malibu, detox destination to the stars. Logan's brother, Garfield, says he paid $42,000 up front to admit the former professional surfer for a month at Promises' canyon-top Mediterranean-style home. Five days later, he says, Promises kicked Logan out for belligerent behavior but kept all the money.
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