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BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hyundai Motors Co., South Korea's largest auto maker, said Thursday it plans to lay off up to 20% of its 30,000 employees. The company's labor union responded immediately with a call for a large protest rally at the company Friday. The Confederation of Trade Unions, a militant umbrella labor group in South Korea, threatened nationwide strikes against spreading mass layoffs. "Layoffs have become inevitable because of sharp drops in our sales," said Shin Dong-ho, a Hyundai spokesman.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Chung Se Yung, 76, former chairman of the Hyundai Motor Co., South Korea's largest automaker, died of pneumonia Saturday at a hospital in Seoul. Chung, who was treated for lung cancer in 2000, was hospitalized recently because of complications from a severe cold, Hyundai Development Co. said in a statement. The younger brother of the late Hyundai Group founder Chung Ju-yung, Chung managed the automotive arm of what once was South Korea's largest family-run business for 32 years.
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BUSINESS
August 24, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Hyundai Motor Co. today reached a breakthrough agreement on layoffs with its union, ending a monthlong occupation of South Korea's largest car plant. The agreement, reached at dawn after four days of almost nonstop talks brokered by government officials, averted a potentially bloody confrontation with workers barricaded in the factory in Ulsan. Hyundai's management agreed to reduce the number of workers to be laid off to 277 from 460.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Hyundai Motor Co. today reached a breakthrough agreement on layoffs with its union, ending a monthlong occupation of South Korea's largest car plant. The agreement, reached at dawn after four days of almost nonstop talks brokered by government officials, averted a potentially bloody confrontation with workers barricaded in the factory in Ulsan. Hyundai's management agreed to reduce the number of workers to be laid off to 277 from 460.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As his bosses in Seoul struggled with bankruptcy last week, Dick Macedo was hurtling around a racetrack in Ventura, apparently worry free as he and other top brass at Kia Motors America Inc. spent a day feting automotive writers. Indeed, the South Korean auto importer's new sales and marketing chief insists that economic woes plaguing the parent company--the entire South Korean auto industry, in fact--have little impact on Irvine-based Kia's operations in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Chung Se Yung, 76, former chairman of the Hyundai Motor Co., South Korea's largest automaker, died of pneumonia Saturday at a hospital in Seoul. Chung, who was treated for lung cancer in 2000, was hospitalized recently because of complications from a severe cold, Hyundai Development Co. said in a statement. The younger brother of the late Hyundai Group founder Chung Ju-yung, Chung managed the automotive arm of what once was South Korea's largest family-run business for 32 years.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As his bosses in Seoul struggled with bankruptcy last week, Dick Macedo was hurtling around a racetrack in Ventura, apparently worry free as he and other top brass at Kia Motors America Inc. spent a day feting automotive writers. Indeed, the South Korean auto importer's new sales and marketing chief insists that economic woes plaguing the parent company--the entire South Korean auto industry, in fact--have little impact on Irvine-based Kia's operations in the United States.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hyundai Motors Co., South Korea's largest auto maker, said Thursday it plans to lay off up to 20% of its 30,000 employees. The company's labor union responded immediately with a call for a large protest rally at the company Friday. The Confederation of Trade Unions, a militant umbrella labor group in South Korea, threatened nationwide strikes against spreading mass layoffs. "Layoffs have become inevitable because of sharp drops in our sales," said Shin Dong-ho, a Hyundai spokesman.
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