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September 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Gallaudet University President I. King Jordan will retire next year, the school for the deaf and hearing impaired announced. Jordan, the school's first deaf president, took office in 1988 after students protested the appointment of a hearing president in a week of demonstrations called Deaf President Now.
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NATIONAL
September 2, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Gallaudet University President I. King Jordan will retire next year, the school for the deaf and hearing impaired announced. Jordan, the school's first deaf president, took office in 1988 after students protested the appointment of a hearing president in a week of demonstrations called Deaf President Now.
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NEWS
October 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Seven months after being racked by student demonstrations, Gallaudet University on Friday officially installed I. King Jordan as the first deaf president in the history of the nation's only university for the hearing-impaired. "Today Gallaudet is not simply installing its eighth president," Jordan told about 2,500 faculty, staff and students crammed into the school's gym. "We are recognizing the right of every disabled person to have unlimited goals and expectations."
NEWS
October 22, 1988 | Associated Press
Seven months after being racked by student demonstrations, Gallaudet University on Friday officially installed I. King Jordan as the first deaf president in the history of the nation's only university for the hearing-impaired. "Today Gallaudet is not simply installing its eighth president," Jordan told about 2,500 faculty, staff and students crammed into the school's gym. "We are recognizing the right of every disabled person to have unlimited goals and expectations."
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Gallaudet University's board of trustees Sunday chose I. King Jordan to be the first deaf president in the 124-year history of the school for the hearing impaired, and announced that board Chairwoman Jane Bassett Spilman has resigned. Jordan, dean of the school's college of arts and sciences, was chosen to replace Elisabeth Ann Zinser, a hearing woman, who resigned early Friday after protests from students seeking a deaf leader had virtually paralyzed Gallaudet's campus.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Classes were scheduled to resume Monday at the nation's only liberal-arts university for the deaf and hearing-impaired after more than 100 demonstrators were arrested in a protest over its incoming president. Gallaudet University had been virtually shut down since Wednesday, when students formed human chains at the gates into campus as they demanded the resignation of Jane K. Fernandes, who was appointed in the spring to succeed outgoing President I. King Jordan in January.
NEWS
March 15, 1988
After a week of turmoil, Gallaudet University's campus in Washington opened with the first deaf president in its 124-year history proclaiming jubilantly, "deaf people can do anything . . . except hear." I. King Jordan was greeted with a standing ovation by students at a campus news conference introducing him and new board of trustees chairman, Philip Bravin. Jordan, 44, lost his hearing at age 20 in a motorcycle accident. He speaks clearly, but also uses sign language when he talks.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Gallaudet University students said Thursday that Elisabeth Ann Zinser, the new president of the school for the deaf, is unwelcome on the campus, and they vowed to keep her out. Students have been protesting the selection of Zinser, who is not deaf and does not know sign language, and their demonstrations have halted virtually all instruction for four days. They have promised to continue their protests until she resigns.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1988 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
"Hands Untied," airing tonight at 7:30 on Channel 2, is a moving half-hour look at the status of the deaf and hearing-impaired community in the 1980s. And, to better serve that community, KCBS takes the unusual step of broadcasting the program with subtitles and American Sign Language as well as the spoken word. "Hands" begins with a look at the student rebellion last March at Gallaudet University in Washington, the nation's only liberal arts college for the deaf.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crawling up the Capitol steps to dramatize the barriers confronting them, scores of disabled persons rallied Monday to protest delays in congressional action on a Senate-passed bill to expand their access to jobs, transportation and public services. The legislation, endorsed by President Bush, has broad bipartisan backing but has been moving at glacial speed through four House committees since it was approved overwhelmingly by the Senate last September.
NEWS
March 14, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Gallaudet University's board of trustees Sunday chose I. King Jordan to be the first deaf president in the 124-year history of the school for the hearing impaired, and announced that board Chairwoman Jane Bassett Spilman has resigned. Jordan, dean of the school's college of arts and sciences, was chosen to replace Elisabeth Ann Zinser, a hearing woman, who resigned early Friday after protests from students seeking a deaf leader had virtually paralyzed Gallaudet's campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Lawrence R. Newman, a prominent advocate for the rights of the deaf community and a former longtime teacher and administrator at the California School for the Deaf in Riverside, has died. He was 86. Newman, who served two terms as president of the National Assn. of the Deaf, died Monday at his home in Riverside of complications from an emergency surgery and a long battle with Parkinson's disease, said his daughter Laureen Newman-Feldhorn. "Larry was a true gentleman and someone I admired for his hard work and dedication on behalf of the deaf community," T. Alan Hurwitz, president of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., the world's only liberal arts university for students who are deaf and hard of hearing, said in a statement to The Times on Tuesday.
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