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I Ll Fly Away Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1991 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
In the opening scene of "Teech," a comedy series that debuted on CBS on Wednesday, a music teacher reports for an expected job at a preppy, all-white boys' school. But because he is black, the headmaster's secretary assumes he is a workman and tells him to go "around to the back, use the service entrance, don't walk on the grass, pick the fruit, talk to the students or eat lunch in plain view of anyone." His response: "Can I plant watermelon seeds on the back forty?"
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Producers Joshua Brand and John Falsey have settled into a rut since the early 1980s. A wonderful rut. Their gleaming creations "St. Elsewhere," "A Year in the Life" and "Northern Exposure" have spoken for themselves. And even this team's least memorable work, last season's "Going to Extremes," glistened at times. Tonight it's their other high achiever, "I'll Fly Away," that commands our attention, becoming that rare series to resurface on PBS after being vanquished by a commercial network.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, Rick Du Brow is The Times' television writer. and
The series is called "Homefront," and it will deal with triumphant GIs returning from World War II when it becomes part of ABC's prime-time lineup this fall. In the pilot episode designed to sell the show to ABC, the opening sequence begins with an American flag filling the screen. We see a newspaper headline that says: "War Ends." A woman narrator tells us, "In the autumn of 1945, America was invincible. . . . The counter tops at the soda fountain were still made of marble. Sodas cost a nickel.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1993 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
"I'll Fly Away," the acclaimed drama canceled by NBC this year, will move to PBS in the fall with an original movie wrapping up the story, followed by a rerun of the entire series, the non-commercial network confirmed Tuesday. The series, which was yanked by NBC despite viewer protests and 15 Emmy nominations last year, stars Sam Waterston as a white Southern lawyer and Regina Taylor as his black housekeeper during the emergence of the nation's civil rights movement beginning in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992
Writers from three "I'll Fly Away" episodes are in the running for cash awards in the 18th annual Humanitas Prizes, which reward the writers of TV programs judged to "most fully enrich the viewing audience." The first-year NBC drama captured two nominations in the category for 60-minute programs, which carries a $15,000 prize, and another in the category for programs 90 minutes or longer, which carries a $25,000 prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1993 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
"I'll Fly Away," the acclaimed drama canceled by NBC this year, will move to PBS in the fall with an original movie wrapping up the story, followed by a rerun of the entire series, the non-commercial network confirmed Tuesday. The series, which was yanked by NBC despite viewer protests and 15 Emmy nominations last year, stars Sam Waterston as a white Southern lawyer and Regina Taylor as his black housekeeper during the emergence of the nation's civil rights movement beginning in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During one three-month block recently, TV writer-producers Joshua Brand and John Falsey had virtually every day booked, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., with meetings on the half hour. No breaks, just continuous meetings. During another monthlong stretch this summer, the two partners didn't see each other once or even speak on the phone because they were so busy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Ralph Ellison's influential novel "The Invisible Man" traces a black man's search for identity amid a white culture that sees "only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination--indeed, everything and anything except me." That comes to mind while watching Lilly Harper, the inspirational black housekeeper in NBC's new series "I'll Fly Away," admonish the smug teen-age son of her white employer. "You don't think I'm here," she tells him, sternly. "I'm here!"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1993 | RICK DU BROW
The news was buried deep in an NBC list of midseason program changes released Monday. A one-sentence announcement said that "I'll Fly Away," one of television's most-honored dramas, would disappear after its Feb. 5 show but remain a "contender" for next fall's lineup. No promises that it definitely would return in the fall--despite its 15 Emmy nominations last year, its Peabody Award and its Directors Guild Award among numerous other prizes. Just a contender.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Producers Joshua Brand and John Falsey have settled into a rut since the early 1980s. A wonderful rut. Their gleaming creations "St. Elsewhere," "A Year in the Life" and "Northern Exposure" have spoken for themselves. And even this team's least memorable work, last season's "Going to Extremes," glistened at times. Tonight it's their other high achiever, "I'll Fly Away," that commands our attention, becoming that rare series to resurface on PBS after being vanquished by a commercial network.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1993 | RICK DU BROW
The news was buried deep in an NBC list of midseason program changes released Monday. A one-sentence announcement said that "I'll Fly Away," one of television's most-honored dramas, would disappear after its Feb. 5 show but remain a "contender" for next fall's lineup. No promises that it definitely would return in the fall--despite its 15 Emmy nominations last year, its Peabody Award and its Directors Guild Award among numerous other prizes. Just a contender.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1992 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During one three-month block recently, TV writer-producers Joshua Brand and John Falsey had virtually every day booked, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., with meetings on the half hour. No breaks, just continuous meetings. During another monthlong stretch this summer, the two partners didn't see each other once or even speak on the phone because they were so busy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1992
Writers from three "I'll Fly Away" episodes are in the running for cash awards in the 18th annual Humanitas Prizes, which reward the writers of TV programs judged to "most fully enrich the viewing audience." The first-year NBC drama captured two nominations in the category for 60-minute programs, which carries a $15,000 prize, and another in the category for programs 90 minutes or longer, which carries a $25,000 prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Ralph Ellison's influential novel "The Invisible Man" traces a black man's search for identity amid a white culture that sees "only my surroundings, themselves or figments of their imagination--indeed, everything and anything except me." That comes to mind while watching Lilly Harper, the inspirational black housekeeper in NBC's new series "I'll Fly Away," admonish the smug teen-age son of her white employer. "You don't think I'm here," she tells him, sternly. "I'm here!"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1991 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Judith Michaelson is a Times staff writer
In the opening scene of "Teech," a comedy series that debuted on CBS on Wednesday, a music teacher reports for an expected job at a preppy, all-white boys' school. But because he is black, the headmaster's secretary assumes he is a workman and tells him to go "around to the back, use the service entrance, don't walk on the grass, pick the fruit, talk to the students or eat lunch in plain view of anyone." His response: "Can I plant watermelon seeds on the back forty?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1991 | RICK DU BROW, Rick Du Brow is The Times' television writer. and
The series is called "Homefront," and it will deal with triumphant GIs returning from World War II when it becomes part of ABC's prime-time lineup this fall. In the pilot episode designed to sell the show to ABC, the opening sequence begins with an American flag filling the screen. We see a newspaper headline that says: "War Ends." A woman narrator tells us, "In the autumn of 1945, America was invincible. . . . The counter tops at the soda fountain were still made of marble. Sodas cost a nickel.
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