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Ian Hamilton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ian Hamilton, the respected British critic, editor, poet and biographer whose unauthorized book on J.D. Salinger was blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court because it quoted from the novelist's unpublished letters without his permission, has died. He was 63. Hamilton died Thursday in London of undisclosed causes, a former employer announced.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By David L. Ulin
"Don't ever tell anybody anything," J.D. Salinger wrote in the closing lines of "The Catcher in the Rye. " "If you do, you start missing everybody. " For more than two decades now, I've thought about that ending as a piece of code. Not that Salinger, who died Wednesday at age 91 in Cornish, N.H., was an oracle, despite what his most dedicated followers -- those who hung around his driveway, hoping for a glimpse of the reclusive author, or parsed his sentences on a million websites -- might believe.
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BOOKS
June 12, 1988 | Mark Harris, Harris is the author of "Saul Bellow, Drumlin Woodchuck." and
This biography was to have been published two years ago in much different form. But, having read advance proofs, Jerome David Salinger, its subject, threatened from his New England retreat to sue the biographer for quoting him without permission. Salinger demanded that the biographer, Ian Hamilton, remove more than 30,000 words from unpublished letters to editors and friends. Hamilton and his publisher, Random House, fought to retain the quoted material, but they lost their case in court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ian Hamilton Finlay, 80, one of Scotland's best-known artists whose work included sculpture, poetry and philosophy, died Monday at a nursing home in Scotland after a long illness, said Victoria Miro, a spokeswoman for his gallery in London. The artist's relationship with nature lay at the heart of his work, and his most famous is "Little Sparta," the garden of his farmhouse at Stonypath in Dunsyre, southwest of Edinburgh. Born in 1925 in Nassau, Bahamas, Finlay moved to Edinburgh in 1950.
BOOKS
October 23, 1994 | Victoria Glendinning, Victoria Glendinning is a biographer whose books include "Vita: A Life of Vita Sackville West" (Morrow) and "Anthony Trollope" (Alfred A. Knopf)
What is posterity? Nothing but "an unending jostle of vanities, appetites and fears," concludes Ian Hamilton at the end of a book that is quite surprisingly entertaining and suggestive. One might not suppose that a work subtitled "Literary Estates and the Rise of Biography" would give one cause to laugh aloud, but it does. Hamilton is a British poet, an editor and himself the biographer of Robert Lowell and, notoriously, of J. D. Salinger (well, he tried).
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Robert Ward, Ward's last novel, "Red Baker," is published by Washington Square Press. For the last four years, he has been working in television, where he has been co-producer of "Hill Street Blues" and co-executive producer of "Miami Vice." and
Ian Hamilton, author of the definitive biography of Robert Lowell, is having fun this time out. Obviously no book that is only 330 pages long, and covers the history of motion pictures from 1915 to 1951, can hope to do justice to its subject. "Writers in Hollywood" must be seen as a sort of primer on the subject. If you want to learn something about the writer in the silent era, Hamilton's got a chapter or two for you.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | KATHERINE STEPHEN
When he was 17, a provincial, intensely literary young man discovered a blue hardback in a secondhand bookstore in a northern English town. The book was "The Catcher in the Rye." That novel, published in 1951, was by the hitherto barely known American writer, J. D. Salinger. By the time the young Englishman, Ian Hamilton, discovered it, the book had already achieved critical acclaim and become a best-seller. But unknown to Hamilton, it was becoming clear that the book was more than that.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By David L. Ulin
"Don't ever tell anybody anything," J.D. Salinger wrote in the closing lines of "The Catcher in the Rye. " "If you do, you start missing everybody. " For more than two decades now, I've thought about that ending as a piece of code. Not that Salinger, who died Wednesday at age 91 in Cornish, N.H., was an oracle, despite what his most dedicated followers -- those who hung around his driveway, hoping for a glimpse of the reclusive author, or parsed his sentences on a million websites -- might believe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ian Hamilton Finlay, 80, one of Scotland's best-known artists whose work included sculpture, poetry and philosophy, died Monday at a nursing home in Scotland after a long illness, said Victoria Miro, a spokeswoman for his gallery in London. The artist's relationship with nature lay at the heart of his work, and his most famous is "Little Sparta," the garden of his farmhouse at Stonypath in Dunsyre, southwest of Edinburgh. Born in 1925 in Nassau, Bahamas, Finlay moved to Edinburgh in 1950.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
This biography became something of a cause celebre in 1986, when Salinger emerged from two decades of seclusion and attempted to block its publication. After a series law suits, Hamilton rewrote the text, shifting the focus to his labors as the biographer of an unwilling subject. The result is an arch solipsism that attempts to cash in on the continuing popularity of "The Catcher in the Rye."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ian Hamilton, the respected British critic, editor, poet and biographer whose unauthorized book on J.D. Salinger was blocked by the U.S. Supreme Court because it quoted from the novelist's unpublished letters without his permission, has died. He was 63. Hamilton died Thursday in London of undisclosed causes, a former employer announced.
BOOKS
October 8, 2000 | CRISTINA NEHRING, Cristina Nehring teaches English literature at UCLA
By the start of the 20th century, the essay was the runt of literary genres. It was what people wrote when they'd "failed in the larger roles, the finer forms, and could not populate a page with people, with passionate poetry." This was the conviction of fiction writer and essayist William Gass in 1985--and the consensus of most academic critics at the time.
BOOKS
October 23, 1994 | Victoria Glendinning, Victoria Glendinning is a biographer whose books include "Vita: A Life of Vita Sackville West" (Morrow) and "Anthony Trollope" (Alfred A. Knopf)
What is posterity? Nothing but "an unending jostle of vanities, appetites and fears," concludes Ian Hamilton at the end of a book that is quite surprisingly entertaining and suggestive. One might not suppose that a work subtitled "Literary Estates and the Rise of Biography" would give one cause to laugh aloud, but it does. Hamilton is a British poet, an editor and himself the biographer of Robert Lowell and, notoriously, of J. D. Salinger (well, he tried).
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Robert Ward, Ward's last novel, "Red Baker," is published by Washington Square Press. For the last four years, he has been working in television, where he has been co-producer of "Hill Street Blues" and co-executive producer of "Miami Vice." and
Ian Hamilton, author of the definitive biography of Robert Lowell, is having fun this time out. Obviously no book that is only 330 pages long, and covers the history of motion pictures from 1915 to 1951, can hope to do justice to its subject. "Writers in Hollywood" must be seen as a sort of primer on the subject. If you want to learn something about the writer in the silent era, Hamilton's got a chapter or two for you.
BOOKS
August 20, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
This biography became something of a cause celebre in 1986, when Salinger emerged from two decades of seclusion and attempted to block its publication. After a series law suits, Hamilton rewrote the text, shifting the focus to his labors as the biographer of an unwilling subject. The result is an arch solipsism that attempts to cash in on the continuing popularity of "The Catcher in the Rye."
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | KATHERINE STEPHEN
When he was 17, a provincial, intensely literary young man discovered a blue hardback in a secondhand bookstore in a northern English town. The book was "The Catcher in the Rye." That novel, published in 1951, was by the hitherto barely known American writer, J. D. Salinger. By the time the young Englishman, Ian Hamilton, discovered it, the book had already achieved critical acclaim and become a best-seller. But unknown to Hamilton, it was becoming clear that the book was more than that.
BOOKS
October 8, 2000 | CRISTINA NEHRING, Cristina Nehring teaches English literature at UCLA
By the start of the 20th century, the essay was the runt of literary genres. It was what people wrote when they'd "failed in the larger roles, the finer forms, and could not populate a page with people, with passionate poetry." This was the conviction of fiction writer and essayist William Gass in 1985--and the consensus of most academic critics at the time.
BOOKS
June 12, 1988 | Mark Harris, Harris is the author of "Saul Bellow, Drumlin Woodchuck." and
This biography was to have been published two years ago in much different form. But, having read advance proofs, Jerome David Salinger, its subject, threatened from his New England retreat to sue the biographer for quoting him without permission. Salinger demanded that the biographer, Ian Hamilton, remove more than 30,000 words from unpublished letters to editors and friends. Hamilton and his publisher, Random House, fought to retain the quoted material, but they lost their case in court.
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