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Ian Hunter

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NEWS
March 10, 1991
Ian McLellan Hunter, a film and television writer who migrated to New York from Hollywood when he became a blacklist target during the McCarthy Era, died Tuesday at a Manhattan hospital. The Academy Award winner--for "Roman Holiday" in 1953--was 75 and had gone to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center to see a doctor. He suffered an apparent heart attack there.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ian Hunter, 84, British agent for classical musicians and an organizer of arts festivals who worked with the Edinburgh Festival, died Sept. 5 in Balcombe, England, of unspecified causes. Among his clients were violinists Yehudi Menuhin and Isaac Stern, pianist Daniel Barenboim and cellist Jacqueline du Pre. Knighted in 1983, Hunter was chairman and president for 35 years of the musicians' management agency Harold Holt Ltd., now Askonas Holt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ian Hunter, 84, British agent for classical musicians and an organizer of arts festivals who worked with the Edinburgh Festival, died Sept. 5 in Balcombe, England, of unspecified causes. Among his clients were violinists Yehudi Menuhin and Isaac Stern, pianist Daniel Barenboim and cellist Jacqueline du Pre. Knighted in 1983, Hunter was chairman and president for 35 years of the musicians' management agency Harold Holt Ltd., now Askonas Holt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
Gosh, I'm sorry Shawn Lusader, Shelley Michelle and Amy Rochelle aren't getting the recognition they deserve as body doubles. One hopes that their careers will lead to parts (no pun intended) that will allow their faces and voices to shine (Film Clips, April 11). Oh, and I'm sure glad that Madonna's performance (which could be termed "neat") in "Body of Evidence" did not require a body double. Now if someone could please find her an acting double. IAN HUNTER North Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air. It must be in the air," said the veteran rocker, whose erratic solo career has yet to eclipse his tenure with the storied British band Mott the Hoople. "In the city there's more energy in the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
In the 20 years since he burst on the rock scene leading the late, often-great Mott The Hoople, Ian Hunter has had his share of musical ups and downs, putting together extraordinary albums and tours, then sometimes reappearing with relative clinkers. He is resurfacing again with a series of Southland shows, and the one he performed Tuesday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano strongly suggests that he is on the "up" side of that pattern.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air," Hunter said this week from a tour stop in Dallas. He and guitarist Mick Ronson bring their band to the Southland for a series of dates starting tonight at the Bacchanal in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air," Hunter said this week from a tour stop in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989
Concerning the Sept. 24 Pop Eye column's mention of Mott the Hoople and guitarist Mick Ronson and, later, the letter of correction from Michael Beltramo: Ronson didn't play on any Mott the Hoople albums but he did in fact join the group in time to play on and produce the last single, "Saturday Gigs." He also played guitar on the last Mott tour. I hope this will put both Mott informants in the right! IAN HUNTER New York Hunter was the founder and leader of Mott the Hoople, a rock band of the '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
Gosh, I'm sorry Shawn Lusader, Shelley Michelle and Amy Rochelle aren't getting the recognition they deserve as body doubles. One hopes that their careers will lead to parts (no pun intended) that will allow their faces and voices to shine (Film Clips, April 11). Oh, and I'm sure glad that Madonna's performance (which could be termed "neat") in "Body of Evidence" did not require a body double. Now if someone could please find her an acting double. IAN HUNTER North Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
The Writers Guild of America is currently investigating whether Dalton Trumbo was wrongfully deprived of credit for the original story and the Academy Award for best story that Ian McLellan Hunter received for the 1953 movie "Roman Holiday," starring Gregory Peck and Audrey Hepburn. There have been recent reports that Hunter "fronted" the script for his friend Trumbo, who was blacklisted in Hollywood for refusal to cooperate with the House Committee on Un-American Activities.
NEWS
March 10, 1991
Ian McLellan Hunter, a film and television writer who migrated to New York from Hollywood when he became a blacklist target during the McCarthy Era, died Tuesday at a Manhattan hospital. The Academy Award winner--for "Roman Holiday" in 1953--was 75 and had gone to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center to see a doctor. He suffered an apparent heart attack there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air. It must be in the air," said the veteran rocker, whose erratic solo career has yet to eclipse his tenure with the storied British band Mott the Hoople. "In the city there's more energy in the air.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM
There is a song called "American Music" on the new album by Ian Hunter and Mick Ronson in which Hunter recalls--with a bit too much schmaltz--how he spent his British boyhood absorbing and mimicking all the great stuff from the States that he had in his record collection. All that study paid off. Hunter has one of the most unpromising natural voices in rock music, a croaky, grainy, ungainly thing that half the time seems to be on the verge of falling off key.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air," Hunter said this week from a tour stop in Dallas. He and guitarist Mick Ronson bring their band to the Southland for a series of dates starting tonight at the Bacchanal in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1989 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Back in the early '80s, Ian Hunter was more like landed gentry than the street-rocker he had been in his younger days. He was living in the country in Upstate New York, breeding German shepherds--and watching his music go down the tubes. "I just don't think there's any energy in the air," Hunter said this week from a tour stop in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1988 | DON WALLER
On paper, the prospect of former Mott the Hoople frontman Ian Hunter recombining with erstwhile partner and ex-Bowie axeman Mick Ronson for a tour that would re-cement their reputations for being among the best 'n' brightest stars of the '70s sounded like an excellent idea, particularly in light of the local glam-rock revival. On Friday at the Palace, however, the Hunter/Ronson Band's nearly two-hour performance was perfunctory, poorly paced and ultimately disappointing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1986
So, the Howard the Duck in Lucasfilm's upcoming "Howard the Duck" movie is just a man in a mask, a guy with a duck head stuck on a Sears' Junior Leisure Suit. My duck in development, the Other Howard, will waddle on his own in a fowl fiberglass body no human could fit. He'll chomp cigars, drool over "female hairless apes" and "waugh" loudly without the need to have a human body shape because some guy is inside. He is a solution to the statement, "You will believe a duck can talk."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989
Concerning the Sept. 24 Pop Eye column's mention of Mott the Hoople and guitarist Mick Ronson and, later, the letter of correction from Michael Beltramo: Ronson didn't play on any Mott the Hoople albums but he did in fact join the group in time to play on and produce the last single, "Saturday Gigs." He also played guitar on the last Mott tour. I hope this will put both Mott informants in the right! IAN HUNTER New York Hunter was the founder and leader of Mott the Hoople, a rock band of the '70s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
In the 20 years since he burst on the rock scene leading the late, often-great Mott The Hoople, Ian Hunter has had his share of musical ups and downs, putting together extraordinary albums and tours, then sometimes reappearing with relative clinkers. He is resurfacing again with a series of Southland shows, and the one he performed Tuesday at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano strongly suggests that he is on the "up" side of that pattern.
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