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Ian I Mitroff

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NEWS
September 25, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Go ahead. Sit there in front of that tube and flick the remote control for as long as you like. This is one news bite that is not likely to come at you: We're in bad shape and getting worse fast because American society cannot deal with the "complexity from without" and the "rot from within"--the rot being in large part television. The medium for that message is a new book by two professors from USC's Graduate School of Business--Ian I. Mitroff and Warren Bennis.
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NEWS
September 25, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Go ahead. Sit there in front of that tube and flick the remote control for as long as you like. This is one news bite that is not likely to come at you: We're in bad shape and getting worse fast because American society cannot deal with the "complexity from without" and the "rot from within"--the rot being in large part television. The medium for that message is a new book by two professors from USC's Graduate School of Business--Ian I. Mitroff and Warren Bennis.
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BUSINESS
December 1, 1985
Reading the Viewpoints of William F. Dwyer II and Ian I. Mitroff in "Should Job Be a Personal Relationship--or Strictly Business?" (Nov. 24), and given my experience as a business consultant and a psychologist, I find it necessary to propose a third position, which integrates the views of the authors. With qualification, I can agree with Dwyer's suggestion to employees to regard their jobs as a business arrangement. However, I am quite certain that his advice is likely to go unheeded.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Can the camera be a voyeur without altering what it purports to monitor? The question applies to both the O.J. Simpson trial, which is ending, and a pair of syndicated "reality" series, which are beginning. More about the series, "Coast Guard" and "U.S. Customs: Classified," shortly. First the trial.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1989 | MARTHA GROVES and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
Chile's fruit isn't the first to fall prey to sabotage. In 1978, a dozen Europeans in at least three countries became ill after eating Israeli oranges, lemons and grapefruit that had been tainted with mercury. A group of Palestinian extremists took responsibility for the poisoning, saying its goal was to "sabotage the Israeli economy." Europe responded by boycotting Israeli citrus for a time, dealing a heavy blow to that nation's fragile finances.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2002 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Each time news reached Edward Ho that another missing employee was found safe, he would open his spiral-bound notebook and cross off the name. There was little else that Ho, a director and soon to be chief executive of IQ Financial Systems Inc., could do to help, stuck as he was on a business trip to Japan while the horror of Sept. 11, 2001, played out in New York. Ho opened his battered tan notebook last week for the first time in nearly a year.
NEWS
September 21, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN and JEFF LEEDS and LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nobody taught John Kneeley the hugging part, and at first he wasn't sure how well he handled it. It isn't in Lee Iacocca's autobiography or Donald Trump's or in any business school curriculum. Like scores of other chief executives whose firms were directly affected by the World Trade Center attack last week, Kneeley fell back on his own instincts and resources--and found out exactly how deep they were.
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