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Ian Whitcomb

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ian Whitcomb hasn't changed much since he was a wisp of a lad growing up outside London. "What I'm doing now is basically what I was doing at age 7 or 8," Whitcomb said. "I've always wanted to create my little world based on American popular culture." And so he has. At 7 he created songs in the Tin Pan Alley style, and at 8 he wrote and illustrated comic books, which he distributed to his prep school classmates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
You missed the point. The writer talked about the nostalgic, non-creative quality of oldies radio, and indeed the stations are basically alike. And boring! But as Ian Whitcomb demonstrates on KPCC-FM, oldies radio doesn't have to be a rehash of the same old crap. Ian and his guests play alternate takes of old hits, live recordings from the '50s and '60s and rare cuts by oldies stars that didn't make the Top 40. Recently, for instance, listeners were treated to an entire 1963 Beatles recording session--in stereo!
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1993
You missed the point. The writer talked about the nostalgic, non-creative quality of oldies radio, and indeed the stations are basically alike. And boring! But as Ian Whitcomb demonstrates on KPCC-FM, oldies radio doesn't have to be a rehash of the same old crap. Ian and his guests play alternate takes of old hits, live recordings from the '50s and '60s and rare cuts by oldies stars that didn't make the Top 40. Recently, for instance, listeners were treated to an entire 1963 Beatles recording session--in stereo!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
"Irving Berlin and Ragtime America" by Ian Whitcomb. Read by Whitcomb. Unabridged on seven cassettes. Books on Tape. The ex-Trinity College (Dublin) student who became a '60s rock star ("You Turn Me On") is now a performer and historian and connoisseur of ragtime. His just-out book uses Berlin as the focal point for a bright, well-researched if slightly redundant history of the ragtime era, which fell roughly between the brass band and jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988
I enjoyed Lawrence Bergreen's article of the recluse Irving Berlin ("Behind the Berlin Wall," March 28). Paul Grein claimed that Berlin "recorded one hit as an artist"--"Oh, How That German Could Love" in 1910. There were no record Top 10s in those days--hits were gauged by sheet music sales, and, anyway, this German dialect song was not a national hit. Irving Berlin, in those days, was a publicity-hound. He constantly gave stories to the press and often, like most of those rambunctious Tin Pan Alleymen, exaggerated.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
In the 25 years since he first arrived in Southern California, British expatriate Ian Whitcomb has developed a deep love and understanding of the country he now calls home. America, however, has never managed to reciprocate. Nestled among his nearly three decades as a musician, writer, dance-band leader, song producer and radio broadcaster are Whitcomb's 15 minutes of fame, which came in 1965 with his Top 10 single, "You Turn Me On (Turn On Song)." The record was banned on many U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
More Public Radio Changes: KPCC-FM has lured Ian Whitcomb away from KCRW, where he hosted a Tuesday afternoon show. Whitcomb's KPCC show, which features ragtime and traditional jazz and music from Tin Pan Alley, airs from 10 p.m. to midnight Monday through Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2000
McCabe's Guitar Shop's fifth "Uketopia" concert, featuring Jim Beloff, Ian Whitcomb, Janet Klein, Peter Brooke Turner of the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain and other ukulele artists, will take place Sunday at 7 p.m. and will be filmed for a documentary inspired by Rhino Records' "Legends of Ukulele." Audience members are encouraged to bring their ukuleles and play along in the concert finale. McCabe's, 3101 Pico Blvd., Santa Monica; $15. (310) 828-4487.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ian Whitcomb hasn't changed much since he was a wisp of a lad growing up outside London. "What I'm doing now is basically what I was doing at age 7 or 8," Whitcomb said. "I've always wanted to create my little world based on American popular culture." And so he has. At 7 he created songs in the Tin Pan Alley style, and at 8 he wrote and illustrated comic books, which he distributed to his prep school classmates.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1990 | JOHN PENNER
In the 25 years since he first arrived in Southern California, British expatriate Ian Whitcomb has developed a deep love and understanding of the country he now calls home. America, however, has never managed to reciprocate. Nestled among his nearly three decades as a musician, writer, dance-band leader, song producer and radio broadcaster are Whitcomb's 15 minutes of fame, which came in 1965 with his Top 10 single, "You Turn Me On (Turn On Song)." The record was banned on many U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN
"Irving Berlin and Ragtime America" by Ian Whitcomb. Read by Whitcomb. Unabridged on seven cassettes. Books on Tape. The ex-Trinity College (Dublin) student who became a '60s rock star ("You Turn Me On") is now a performer and historian and connoisseur of ragtime. His just-out book uses Berlin as the focal point for a bright, well-researched if slightly redundant history of the ragtime era, which fell roughly between the brass band and jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1988
I enjoyed Lawrence Bergreen's article of the recluse Irving Berlin ("Behind the Berlin Wall," March 28). Paul Grein claimed that Berlin "recorded one hit as an artist"--"Oh, How That German Could Love" in 1910. There were no record Top 10s in those days--hits were gauged by sheet music sales, and, anyway, this German dialect song was not a national hit. Irving Berlin, in those days, was a publicity-hound. He constantly gave stories to the press and often, like most of those rambunctious Tin Pan Alleymen, exaggerated.
NEWS
January 6, 2005
Saturday marks what would have been Elvis Presley's 70th birthday, so in addition to the annual Elvis Birthday Bash, the L.A. City Council is getting in on the festivities by proclaiming it Elvis Day and installing a plaque at the recording studio on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood where he recorded "Jailhouse Rock" and many other hits.
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